Public Administration Review

Articles from Vol. 55, No. 2, March-April

Bureaucracy, Organizational Redundancy, and the Privatization of Public Services
A common theme in the platforms of political candidates from presidents to big city mayors is a promise to consolidate fragmented systems, reduce needless duplication of services, and streamline public bureaucracies upon election to office. Although...
Chinese Public Administration: Change with Continuity during Political and Economic Development
A decade ago in this journal, Worthley (1984) argued that public administration in the People's Republic of China was becoming ripe for comparative analysis. Since then, China has experienced extraordinary economic growth and has initiated major administrative...
Old Wine in New Bottles Tastes Better: A Case Study of TQM Implementation in the IRS
Joseph Juran is an author, lecturer, and corporate advisor on Total Quality Management (TQM). Juran (1964) has had experience in universities, industry, and government agencies, and he believes that the principles of TQM can be applied with equal success...
Rediscovering Principles of Public Administration: The Neglected Foundation of Public Law
Over the past five decades, the field of public administration has gradually lost its theoretical distinctiveness. Today, public administration has largely abandoned or forgotten its roots in public law - in the Constitution, statutes, and case law -...
Reform with Chinese Characteristics: The Context of Chinese Civil Service Reform
In an article in 1887, Woodrow Wilson called for a discipline of public administration separate from political science. He argued that Americans should look to European governments for administrative structures. He spent much of the article justifying...
State Agencies' Experience with Strategic Planning: Findings from a National Survey
Since the early 1980s, strategic planning has been one of the "hot" innovations in public administration, promising public agencies the benefits of a rational and highly structured, future-oriented management technique borrowed from the best run private...
The Hidden Dimensions of Japanese Administration: Culture and Its Impact
We have witnessed an abundance of literature on the Japanese culture and its impact on management in business and industrial organizations. Paradoxically, the literature on Japanese public administration has given little explicit consideration to the...
Why Don't They Do What We Want? an Exploration of Organizational Responses to Institutional Pressures in Community Health Centers
Throughout the last two decades, the nonprofit sector has emerged as a major provider of basic health and human services and as a prime implementor of certain public policies (Kramer, 1981; Saidel, 1991; Salamon, 1987; Smith and Lipsky, 1993). At the...
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