Public Administration Review

Articles from Vol. 56, No. 4, July-August

An Empirical Examination of Innovations in Integrated Environmental Management: The Case of the Great Lakes Basin
The American commitment to environmental protection has grown markedly in recent decades, whether measured by public opinion surveys or the amount of money devoted to protection activities. Environmental issues have steadily climbed as an area of widespread...
Congressional Budget Reform: The Unanticipated Implications for Federal Policy Making
The Congressional Budget and Impoundment Control Act of 1974, the landmark piece of legislation that created the congressional budget process, is now more than 20 years old. The budget process has undergone substantial revisions since its inception,...
Consensus-Building for Integrated Resources Planning
Recently, integrated resources planning (IRP) has begun to be used in evaluating water supply options for large populations experiencing water scarcity. Traditionally employed to make decisions in the energy sector about different energy mixes, integrated...
Designing Effective Performance-Measurement Systems under the Government Performance and Results Act of 1993
Performance measurement has been the object of increasing interest since the late 1980s. The need for systematic performance measurement in governmental organizations is well documented in the literature (Brown and Pyers, 1988; ASPA, 1992; Wholey and...
Federal Employees, Torts, and the Westfall Act of 1988
The Federal Employees Liability Reform and Tort Compensation Act - better known as the Westfall Act - was rushed into law in 1988 to avoid what was expected to be a crisis in exposing federal workers to court suits. The law was intended to overturn the...
Hazards and Institutional Trustworthiness: Facing a Deficit of Trust
We live in a time when institutions of all kinds are instruments of great power and are often the objects of deep suspicion. Not surprisingly, scholars and political commentators have noted that the public increasingly distrusts many of those organizations....
Public Personnel Management and Democratization: A View from Three Central American Republics
The development of stable democratic societies in Central America has been a popular news topic and a primary U.S. foreign policy objective for the past decade. Democratization has been a prime concern of social scientists in general (Barry, 1991; Booth,...
Transformational Challenges in Central and Eastern Europe and Schools of Public Administration
Two dimensions of changes in Central and Eastern European countries formerly dominated by the Soviet Union are considered here: (1) obstacles to transformations away from strong state domination and (2) contrasting approaches in public administration...
Violence in the American Workplace: Challenges to the Public Employer
Among the many problems confronted by public as well as private employers are injuries resulting from occupational violent crime (OVC) or workplace violence.(1) OVC injury is defined as intentional battery, rape, or homicide during the course of employment....
What Middle Managers Do in Local Government: Stewardship of the Public Trust and the Limits of Reinventing Government
The most serious resistance to teamwork and participatory management often comes from middle managers, not unions. If employees are making decisions and solving problems, middle managers become superfluous. Too often they stand in the way of actions,...
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