Public Administration Review

Articles from Vol. 56, No. 2, March-April

A Demand-Side Perspective on the Importance of Representative Bureaucracy: AIDS, Ethnicity, Gender, and Sexual Orientation
In a polity that relies on representation to achieve a semblance of democracy, the composition of a non-elected arm of government such as the bureaucracy is important. In recent years, public administration scholars have addressed the topic in a number...
Balancing Work and Family Responsibilities: Flextime and Child Care in the Federal Government
Our increasingly diverse work force struggles to manage child care, elder care, family emergencies, and other personal commitments, while working conditions become ever more important. The federal government must maintain its "model employer" status...
Bringing Politics Back In: Defense Policy and the Theoretical Study of Institutions and Processes
In 1960, Morris Janowitz argued that the publication of Samuel Huntington's landmark study, The Soldier and the State, represented "the first time since Alexis de Tocqueville that American military institutions were being analyzed as an aspect of the...
Channel Modeling: From West Point Cadet to General
The U.S. Army and Air Force are two of many organizations that are characterized as meritocracies, where career advancement is supposed to be determined mostly by one's ability to achieve institutional goals. Critics have long claimed, however, that...
Music of the Squares: A Lifetime of Study of Public Administration
Author's Note: In 1989, Nelson W. Polsby and Martin Landau, of the Institute of Governmental Studies at the University of California, Berkeley, contemplated an experiment to preserve the intellectual heritage of public administration by having people...
Public Policy and Administration: The Goals of Rationality and Responsibility
No problem is more momentous for the modern democratic state than its capacity to develop rational, responsible, goal-oriented policy. In many fields, including the most crucial ones, foreign policy and defense, the staff work on which well conceived...
Reinventing Government: The Case of the Department of Defense
The Department of Defense (DoD), the largest of federal government bureaucracies in both numbers and budgets has undergone sustained organizational reform since the National Security Act of 1947 and the Key West decision of 1948 which resolved questions...
The Future of Public Administration: End of a Short Stay in the Sun? or a New Day A-Dawning?
Editor's Note: This is the first in a series of two articles on the intellectual development of public administration under Professor Jack Rabin's editorship. The Editors are very grateful to him for creating the series and bringing the articles to...
The Promotion Record of the United States Army: Glass Ceilings in the Officer Corps
Although the federal government has achieved unprecedented diversity in its labor force, achieving representation across agencies and throughout their hierarchies remain two of the greatest challenges to contemporary personnel administration. Women hold...
Workplace Preparedness and the Americans with Disabilities Act: Lessons from Municipal Governments' Management of HIV/AIDS
Although the 1990 Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) is designed to protect all disabled individuals from workplace discrimination, its mission is somewhat more difficult to accomplish in situations involving employees and job applicants who are either...
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