American Criminal Law Review

American Criminal Law Review is a magazine covering criminal law in the U.S. It is published quarterly by Georgetown University Law Center.Subjects for American Criminal Law Review include: Police, Penology, and Penal Institutions; Law.

Articles from Vol. 36, No. 2, Spring

Anything You Say Can and Will Be Used against You: Spectrographic Evidence in Criminal Cases
I. INTRODUCTION In 1967, a court had the first opportunity to pass upon the admissibility of spectrographic evidence.(1) Since then, there has been a swirl of controversy surrounding what some feel is an unreliable, highly subjective test,(2) and...
Apprehending the Weapon Within: The Case for Criminalizing the Intentional Transmission of HIV
I. INTRODUCTION The reality is people are dying in epidemic numbers from AIDS. For too long, this disease has been treated as a political struggle, not a public health crisis. With the introduction of the "HIV Prevention Act of 1997," ...
Considering Race and Crime: Distilling Non-Partisan Policy from Opposing Theories
I. INTRODUCTION Much ink has been spilled discussing the intersections of race and crime. In most of these discussions, "race" signifies African Americans(1) and issues of disproportionate incarceration and arrest are the most familiar starting...
Murder by Premeditation
I. INTRODUCTION Murder began as a common law crime. In Anglo-American legal history, murder was first defined, and made a crime, by judges. Judges did not divide murder into degrees, however. That was done by legislatures. It is to legislatures,...
Panel Discussion
ASSOCIATION OF AMERICAN LAW SCHOOLS PANEL ON THE INTERNATIONAL CRIMINAL COURT JANUARY 9, 1999 NEW ORLEANS, LOUISIANA Panelists: Professors Christopher L. Blakesley, Malvina Halberstam, Dorean Marguerite Koenig, Leila Sadat Wexler, and Edward...
Representing Indigents in Serious Criminal Cases in England's Crown Court: The Advocates' Performance and Incentives
I. INTRODUCTION While indigent defendants charged with serious criminal offenses can be represented by lawyers in the United States and by barristers and solicitors in England and Wales. Gauging the quality of that help is an important but elusive...