Marvels & Tales

Articles from Vol. 27, No. 2, 2013

"A Fool Will Never Be Happy": Kurahashi Yumiko's Retelling of "Snow White"
Kurahashi's Approach to Fairy TalesIn Otona no tame no zankoku döwa (Cruel Fairy Tales for Adults) Kurahashi Yumiko (1935-2005) reworks a wide range of Western and Japanese literary sources, creating a fascinating collection of fairy tales.1 The collection...
Ambiguous Bodies: Reading the Grotesque in Japanese Setsuwa Tales
Ambiguous Bodies: Reading the Grotesque in Japanese Setsuwa Tales by Michelle Osterfeld Li. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2009.Setsuwa are "short Japanese tales that depict extraordinary events, illustrate basic Buddhist principles or . ....
Anime and Its Roots in Early Japanese Monster Art
Anime and Its Roots in Early Japanese Monster Art is a welcome addition to the growing body of academic writing in English on Japanese manga and anime. However, it suffers from a misleading title, which may alienate its target audience of Japanese scholars,...
Envisioning the Invisible: Sex, Species, and Anomaly in Contemporary Japanese Women's Fiction
In his widely influential study Literary Cultures in History: Reconstructions from South Asia, Sheldon Pollock argues that, for a variety of historical reasons, modem Western apprehensions of South Asian literature are distorted by, for instance, anachronistic...
From the Editors
Since its founding in 1987, Marvels & Tales has sought to provide a forum in which modem fairy-tale studies could not only critically reassess the canonical collections and classical fairy tales of European cultures but also expand the field's scope...
Lost Property Fairy Tales: Ogawa Yoko and Higami Kumiko's Transformations of "The Little Mermaid"
Hans Christian Andersen's 1837 fairy tale "Den lille havfrue" (The Little Mermaid), combined with the strange creatures of premodem mermaid mythologies, has inspired a rich variety of fairy-tale transformations in Japan since its translation in 1904....
Miracles of Book and Body: Buddhist Textual Culture and Medieval Japan
Miracles of Book and Body: Buddhist Textual Culture and Medieval Japan By Charlotte Eubanks. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2011.Some years ago I visited Ryüköji, a Buddhist temple near the Japanese city Aizu-Wakamatsu. My goal was to view...
Oba Minako the Raconteur: Refashioning a Yamauba Tale
As a young schoolgirl, Öba Minako (1930-2007) was totally absorbed by mukashi-banashi (ancient folktales), otogi-zöshi (classical Japanese fairy tales), and otogi-banashi (fairy tales in modem Japanese) as well as classical Western fairy tales by Hans...
Pandemonium and Parade: Japanese Monsters and the Culture of Yokai
Pandemonium and Parade: Japanese Monsters and the Culture of Yokai By Michael Dylan Foster. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2009.Yökai are, to borrow Michael Dylan Foster's own terminology in this fascinating study, the "monsters" of Japanese...
Preface to the Special Issue on the Fairy Tale in Japan
One of the motivating forces behind this special issue of Marvels & Tales was the scarcity of scholarship dealing directly with the influence of folktales and fairy tales on contemporary Japanese writers and artists. Scholarly articles that have...
(Re)animating Folklore: Raccoon Dogs, Foxes, and Other Supernatural Japanese Citizens in Takahata Isao's Heisei Tanuki Gassen Pompoko
One day long ago, a lord on the island of Shikoku found two identical-looking women sitting in his house, each claiming to be his wife. A doctor speculated that some ailment had caused the wife's spirit to separate into two. Even so, chanting Buddhist...
Shojo to Akuma to Fushagoya (the Girl without Hands) and Honmono No Fianse (the True Bride)
Shojo to akuma to fushagoya (The Girl Without Hands) and Honmono no fianse (The True Bride). Written by Olivier Pj, and directed by Miyagi Satoshi. Shöjo to akuma to füshagoya (The Girl Without Hands) and Honmono no fianse (The True Bride). Written by...
Tawada Yoko's "The Man with Two Mouths"
Translator's IntroductionTawada Yöko's short story "Futakuchi otoko" (The Man with Two Mouths) is about a group of late-twentieth-century Japanese tourists who encounter the medieval trickster Till Eulenspiegel on a tour of Lower Saxony. The Till of...
Terayama Shuji and Bluebeard
To write about Bluebeard in Japan during the early 1960s would have been inevitably to enter into dialogue not just with Charles Perrault's 1697 fairy tale about the wealthy man, his most recent of many wives, and the key he forbids her to use but also...
Terayama Shuji's Red Riding Hood
Translator's IntroductionTerayama Shüji (1935-1983) is best known for his work with the experimental theater group Tenjö Sajiki; he was also a poet, photographer, essayist, and filmmaker. 1 Terayama was also the author of innovative but critically neglected...
The Demon at Agi Bridge and Other Japanese Tales
The Demon at Agi Bridge and Other Japanese Tales. Trans. Burton Watson. Edited by Shirane Haruo. New York: Columbia University Press, 2011.No one can deny the significance of setsuwa ("spoken story" in old Japanese, or technically, "anecdotes") in the...
The Fairy Tale and Anime: Traditional Themes, Images, and Symbols at Play on Screen
The Fairy Tale and Anime: Traditional Themes, Images, and Symbols at Play on Screen. By Dani Cavallaro. Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 2011.Written by British freelance writer Dani Cavallaro, The Fairy Tale and Anime: Traditional Themes, Images, and Symbols...
The Princess, the Witch, and the Fireside: Yanagi Miwa's Uncanny Restaging of Fairy Tales
The work of the Japanese artist Yanagi Miwa (1967-) explores received images of women and their own self-images in contemporary society, particularly through the reconfiguration of the intergenerational relationship between women. Among the cultural...
The Yokai in the Database: Supernatural Creatures and Folklore in Manga and Anime
Many Japanese anime and manga narratives draw on Japanese folklore, reimagining tales for a modem audience, and contain references to or examples of supernatural creatures, or yökai.1 As in Western culture, yökai, which can be translated as monsters,...
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