MELUS

A journal concentrating on multi-ethnic American literature for the academic audience.

Articles from Vol. 18, No. 2, Summer

A MELUS Interview: Helen Barolini
Helen Barolini, the author of numerous stories, essays, translations, and poems which have been published in such journals as The Kenyon Review, The Saturday Review, and The Yale Review, is the recipient of many awards, among them the 1987 Susan Koppelman...
Cross-Cultural Reading versus Textual Accessibility in Multicultural Literature
Reed Way Dasenbrock, in his article "Intelligibility and Meaningfulness in Multicultural Literature in English," concludes that unintelligibility should not be an obstacle to the "understanding and evaluation of multicultural texts" (11). Instead,...
'Eleni': Hellenizing the Subject, Westernizing the Discourse
American immigrant literature whether it begins with the work of Cabeza de Vaca, William Bradford or a number of other texts, begins, nevertheless, with a journal meticulously re-presenting the moment of radical crisis that the text's subject experiences...
He Speaks for Whom?: Inscription and Reinscription of Women in 'Invisible Man' and 'The Salt Eaters.' (Varieties of Ethnic Criticism)
1 What happens to "the second sex" in a novel as powerful as Ellison's Invisible Man where the trope of invisibility functions as a critique of racist American society? When the text itself perpetuates the invisibility it seeks to undo, it seems...
Sicilian Folk Narrative versus Sicilian-American Literature: Mangione's "Mount Allegro." (Jerre Mangione) (Varieties of Ethnic Criticism)
Considered by some critics to be a classic of Italian-American literature, Jerre Mangione's Mount Allegro has been praised for its "folkloric popular humus,... [its] social voice celebrating its own subaltern condition..., [its] cultural patrimony...
The Young Gangster as Mythic American Hero: E.L. Doctorow's 'Billy Bathgate.' (Varieties of Ethnic Criticism)
Among the creative principles held by E.L. Doctorow are the notion that "history lives in people as imagery" (Ruas 200), and the idea of "using disreputable materials and doing something serious with them" (McCaffery 36). In Billy Bathgate (1989),...
Writing Nature: Silko and Native Americans as Nature Writers
Historians such as William Cronon (Changes in the Land, 1983) and Wilbur R. Jacobs ("Indians as Ecologists," 1980); ecologists such as Stewart L. Udall (The Quiet Crisis, 1963); and religion scholars such as Christopher Vecsey ("American Indian Environmental...
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