MELUS

A journal concentrating on multi-ethnic American literature for the academic audience.

Articles from Vol. 22, No. 2, Summer

Deposing the Man of the House: Terry McMillan Rewrites the Family
In Terry McMillan's first novel, Mama, Mildred's husband is holding fiercely to his notion of being the "man of the house" within the nuclear family: Crook...found his thick brown leather belt.... Then he made her drop her coat next to it,...
Du Bois and the Minstrels
W.E.B. Du Bois's The Souls of Black Folk is not a book that can be read in ignorance of its historic milieu; to focus exclusively on the text would be to cripple it. First published in 1903, it was written in an America in which the white majority...
Ethnocentric Guilt in Tony Hillerman's 'Dance Hall of the Dead.'(Popular Literature and Film)
Tony Hillerman's ethnographic detective novels have been widely acclaimed. He has acquired a loyal following of readers among both Native and Anglo-Americans as well as international readers. This success has been attributed in part to the Navajo...
Last of the Red Hot Mohicans: Miscegenation in the Popular American Romance
In his 1824 "Essay on Romance," Sir Walter Scott states that "romance turns upon marvelous or uncommon events," while the novel "accommodated to the ordinary train of human events and the modern state of society" (554). Scott's definition served as...
The Irish in John Ford's Seventh Cavalry Trilogy - Victor McLaglen's Stooge-Irish Character
Irish-Americans are not as sensitive as they once were regarding ethnic stereotypes applied to them, but neither has the issue been laid to rest. Alexandra Ripley's recent novel Scarlett, an alleged sequel to Gone with the Wind, according to a syndicated...
The Quest for True Love: Ethnicity in Nancy Savoca's Domestic Film Comedy
In a poem entitled "Mafioso," Sandra Mortola Gilbert simultaneously links herself to and dissociates herself from two prevailing images of her ethnicity in American culture--food and the Mafia: "Frank Costello eating spaghetti in a cell at San Quentin,...
Whose Home on the Range? Finding Room for Native Americans, African Americans, and Latino Americans in the Revisionist Western
In 1939, John Ford, the master auteur of the Western film, directed two films with significantly different endings. In Drums Along the Mohawk, after Claudette Colbert and Henry Fonda survive the English, the Indians, and the French, the entire community...
Winnifred Eaton and the Politics of Miscegenation in Popular Fiction
Though Winnifred Eaton's early works, Miss Nume of Japan (1899) and A Japanese Nightingale (1901), are structured in the form of seemingly simple romance stories, they also serve as a gauge of the complex sexual and racial attitudes of both the author...
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