MELUS

A journal concentrating on multi-ethnic American literature for the academic audience.

Articles from Vol. 31, No. 3, Fall

"A Complication of Complaints": Untangling Disability, Race, and Gender in William and Ellen Craft's Running A Thousand Miles for Freedom
In 1845, Ellen Craft and her husband William escaped from slavery in Georgia by traveling disguised as a "white invalid gentlemen" and his valet. After a four-day journey, they arrived on free soil in Philadelphia and soon became prominent in the Boston-based...
At the Crossroads: Disability and Trauma in the Farming of Bones
In October of 1937, Dominican dictator Rafael Trujillo ordered his troops to massacre as many as 15,000 Haitians living in the Dominican Republic. (1) The attack came as a complete surprise to these Haitians as well as to many Dominicans; no prior...
Bodies in the Borderlands: Gloria Anzaldua's and David Wojnarowicz's Mobility Machines
In "Chicana tejana lesbian-feminist poet and fiction writer" Gloria Anzaldua's classic work of border(lands) theory, Borderlands/La Frontera, she remarks that "[t]he work of the mestiza consciousness is to break down the subject-object duality that...
Cutting the Tongue: Language and the Body in Kingston's the Woman Warrior
One of the most widely taught books in American colleges in recent years, Maxine Hong Kingston's The Woman Warrior has a vexed reception history that both attests to its popularity and questions it. (1) The debates regarding Kingston's text that flared...
Editors' Introduction: Race, Ethnicity, Disability, and Literature: Intersections and Interventions
Since the introduction of disability studies into the fields of the humanities and cultural studies in the early 1990s, the field has, to a large extent, concerned itself with the politics of representation, focusing on creating knowledge about the...
Exploring the World of the Different in Leslie Marmon Silko's Almanac of the Dead
A borderland is a vague and undetermined place created by the emotional residue of an unnatural boundary. It is in a constant state of transition. The prohibited and forbidden are its inhabitants. Los atravesados live here: the squint-eyed, the perverse,...
Melancholia as Resistance in Contemporary African American Literature
Dualism in ralph ellison's invisible man I am outside of history, i wash i had some peanuts, it looks hungry there in its cage i am inside of history, its hungrier than i thot --Ishmael Reed (1972) The fields of African...
"When Black Women Start Going on Prozac": Race, Gender, and Mental Illness in Meri Nana-Ama Danquah's Willow Weep for Me
Meri Nana-Ama Danquah's Willow Weep for Me: A Black Woman's Journey Through Depression (1998) is a first-person narrative by an author who, without identifying as "disabled" or signaling any alliance with the disability rights movement, describes the...
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