Child Welfare

Child Welfare is a professional trade journal published bimonthly by the Child Welfare League of America, Inc., Arlington, Va. Founded in 1921, the journal provides policy, practice, and program information to professionals who work in the child welfare industry.

Articles from Vol. 74, No. 1, January

Adoption and Disclosure of Family Information: A Historical Perspective
During the past decade, adoptive parents have challenged adoption agencies' right to withhold the medical and social history of an adopted child and the child's biological family by bringing lawsuits alleging the tort of wrongful adoption. This civil...
A History of Placing-Out: The Orphan Trains
One of the central issues of poverty with which American society has struggled involves assisting people who are poor without making those people indefinitely dependent on public support. Traditionally, providing assistance to individuals whose poverty...
An Outrage to Common Decency: Historical Perspectives on Child Neglect
Today, child neglect is generally understood, defined, investigated, and acted upon in personal and in gender-specific terms. Most often, neglect is seen as the failure of individual mothers to carry out their mothering responsibilities [Swift 1991]....
Bring Back the Orphanages? What Policymakers of Today Can Learn from the Past
In many jurisdictions in the United States, proposals to "bring back the orphanages" are gathering momentum. Charles Murray of the American Enterprise Institute, a proponent of institutional care, espouses an end to AFDC payments to single mothers, with...
Child Welfare in Fiction and Fact
Most of the children who are the principal characters in the novels under consideration are foundlings, orphans, or half-orphans. Except in rare instances, as in Charles Kingsley's Alton Locke [1850], the surviving parent is away or too weak to exert...
Factors and Events Leading to the Passage of the Indian Child Welfare Act
The year was 1968 and members of the Devils Lake Sioux Tribe of North Dakota were concerned about the treatment of American Indian children by local county welfare officials. The children were routinely removed from their families and placed in foster...
From Family Duty to Family Policy: The Evolution of Kinship Care
The increasing number and proportion of children in out-of-home care placed in the homes of relatives are among the most important child welfare trends of the decade [Berrick et al. 1994; Center for the Study of Social Policy 1990]. This article describes...
From Indenture to Family Foster Care: A Brief History of Child Placing
Americans have always arranged for some children to be reared by adults other than their own parents. In colonial America, children from all classes were indentured into new homes to learn a trade. In the 1850s, the Children's Aid Society began sending...
From "Operation Brown Baby" to "Opportunity": The Placement of Children of Color at the Boys and Girls Aid Society of Oregon
In 1899, a mother in Portland, Oregon, relinquished her 20-day-old daughter, Lena, to Mr. and Mrs. Mow with the hope that they would "adopt, educate and raise my girl baby." The Mows cared for Lena for nearly two years until one June day when she was...
Information Sources on Child Welfare Archives: How to Identify, Locate, and Use Them for Research
Child welfare is "that part of human services and social welfare programs and ideologies oriented toward the protection, care, and healthy development of children" [Barker 1991: 35], and social welfare archives are "among the cumulative by-products of...
Janie Porter Barrett and the Virginia Industrial School for Colored Girls: Community Response to the Needs of African American Children
Virginia will not forget that she is indebted to the colored women of the Commonwealth for the Industrial Home School. [Davis 1920: 362]Historically, African American child welfare services have evolved as a response to exclusion, differential treatment,...
Rosie the Riveter and Her Latchkey Children: What Americans Can Learn about Child Day Care from the Second World War
"What has happened to the nuclear family, which was once the backbone of American life?" asked the letter-writer in late 1985. "It taught love, generosity, caring and giving. It built character. Please answer, Ann. I am--Suffering from Culture Shock...
The Child Welfare Response to Youth Violence and Homelessness in the Nineteenth Century
Once again the United States is facing the interrelated problems of homeless families and children, street gangs, and youth violence [Detweiler 1992; Gulati 1993]. In many cities, children are engaging in criminal behavior to support themselves and joining...
The Citizens' Committee for Children of New York and the Evolution of Child Advocacy (1945-1972)
In a discussion paper entitled "Philanthropy in a Liberal Education," Payton [1991] described the functions of advocacy as articulating the failures of the government and the marketplace, as well as pointing out the inconstancies, inefficiencies, and...
The Dilemma in Saving Children from Child Labor: Reform and Casework at Odds with Families' Needs (1900-1938)
Early in this century, reformers lobbied for regulation of child labor and compulsory school attendance. This article draws on their publications, agency case records, professional literature, and historical studies to examine the role of social workers...
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