Child Welfare

Child Welfare is a professional trade journal published bimonthly by the Child Welfare League of America, Inc., Arlington, Va. Founded in 1921, the journal provides policy, practice, and program information to professionals who work in the child welfare industry.

Articles from Vol. 94, No. 4, 2015

Acknowledgements
This Special Issue of Child Welfare journal, Families in Child Welfare Affected by Substance Use, was made possible with support from the National Center on Substance Abuse and Child Welfare (NCSACW ), which is funded by the Substance Abuse and Mental...
A Note on Substance Use Disorder Terminology
Professionals in the fields of child welfare, treatment for substance use disorders, and the courts that oversee cases of child abuse and neglect may use a range of terminology to refer to concepts related to substance use, physical dependence, and addiction,...
Co-Occurrence of Parental Substance Abuse and Child Serious Emotional Disturbance: Understanding Multiple Pathways to Improve Child and Family Outcomes
Families who become involved with the child welfare system because of child maltreatment face multiple and complex needs that must be addressed prior to successful reunification. Children who experience maltreatment frequently enter the child welfare...
Effects of a Rural Family Drug Treatment Court Collaborative on Child Welfare Outcomes: Comparison Using Propensity Score Analysis
Family drug treatment courts (FDTCs), also known as family treatment drug courts or dependency drug courts, are promising interventions that integrate specialized courts with substance use disorder treatment and child welfare services to address the...
Family-Based Recovery: An Innovative In-Home Substance Abuse Treatment Model for Families with Young Children
In Connecticut (CT), parental substance abuse is reported as a factor in half of foster care placements of children under the age of 31 (National Data Archive on Child Abuse and Neglect, 2015). This age group also experiences the highest rates of maltreatment...
From the Editor: Substance Use and Child Welfare
Child welfare has been consistently dominated by three major social dilemmas that have serious consequences for our children, youth, and families: substance use disorders, domestic violence, and mental health. All of these conditions occur under a wide...
How Many Families in Child Welfare Services Are Affected by Parental Substance Use Disorders? A Common Question That Remains Unanswered
Parental substance use disorders are a major concern within the child welfare system (Hill, Tessner, & McDermott, 2011; Seay & Kohl, 2013; Seay & Kohl, 2015; Staton-Tindall, Sprang, Clark, Walker, & Craig, 2013). Yet, estimates of the...
Mental Health Disorders among Children within Child Welfare Who Have Prenatal Substance Exposure: Rural vs. Urban Populations
Prenatal substance exposure is a significant risk factor for child development. The direct biological toxicity of the drugs and the social and psychological chaos of the drug-abusing environment ultimately impede the child's growth and development and...
New Approaches for Working with Children and Families Involved in Family Treatment Drug Courts: Findings from the Children Affected by Methamphetamine Program
More than 8.3 million children in the United States under the age of 18 live with a parent who is dependent on alcohol or needs treatment for a substance use disorder, representing 11.9% of children nationwide. For children younger than 6 years of age,...
Practice-Informed Approaches to Addressing Substance Abuse and Trauma Exposure in Urban Native Families Involved with Child Welfare
The movement of American Indians into urban areas that began in earnest in the 1950s has resulted in 78% of all American Indians and Alaska Natives now living in cities rather than on reservations or in tribal communities (Norris, Vines, & Hoeffel,...
Rethinking Child Welfare to Keep Families Safe and Together: Effective Housing-Based Supports to Reduce Child Trauma, Maltreatment Recidivism, and Re-Entry to Foster Care
In pursuit of the protection and best interests of children, the state has a right to intervene in the private affairs of families by removing from their home children who are neglected or abused and placing them into protective custody, often in a foster...
Sobriety Treatment and Recovery Teams in Rural Appalachia: Implementation and Outcomes
Parental substance use and child maltreatment are complex and interconnected problems. It is estimated that more than one million parents enter treatment for substance use each year (Young, Boles, & Otero, 2007). While many of these parents will...
Special Foreword: Substance Use and Child Welfare
CWLA's 2001 Special Issue of Child Welfare put a spotlight on parental substance use disorders among families in child welfare, including those involved with dependency courts. This topic was of increasing concern because throughout the 1990s, child...
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