Child Welfare

Child Welfare is a professional trade journal published bimonthly by the Child Welfare League of America, Inc., Arlington, Va. Founded in 1921, the journal provides policy, practice, and program information to professionals who work in the child welfare industry.

Articles from Vol. 95, No. 1, 2017

Adoption Policy and the Well-Being of Adopted Children in the United States
In the United States during the 1990s, rising numbers of children entered foster care and falling numbers exited. The number of children in foster care peaked at about 570,000-nearly eight in 1,000 children-in federal fiscal year 1999, and the average...
Child Sexual Abuse and the Impact of Rurality on Foster Care Outcomes: An Exploratory Analysis
In federal fiscal year (FFY) 2014, 3.6 million child abuse and neglect referrals were made alleging the maltreatment of 6.6 million children in the United States. Of these, approximately 3.2 million (48.5%) received either an investigation or alternative...
From the Editor: Real Scholarship on Real-World Issues for America's Children, Youth, and Families
In an era of allegations about fake news, unsubstantiated tweets, and accusations that long-standing social programs are ineffective, our country and our profession needs to focus even harder on real-world, rigorous approaches to examine and to be responsive...
Polypharmacy and Pregnancy among Foster Children
Acknowledgements: The authors wish to acknowledge the support of the State of Wyoming for this research. The study was based on healthcare data compiled for the state government. The Wyoming Department of Family Services funded analytical and other research...
Psychological Maltreatment, the Under-Recognized Violence against Children: A New Portrait from Quebec
Acknowledgements: This study was funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC), with the collaboration of many professionals from the Centre jeunesse de Montreal-Institut universitaire (CJM-IU), and Quebec's 16 Youth...
The Family Unification Program (FUP): A Housing Option for Former Foster Youth
Approximately 25,000 young people between 18 and 21 years old "age out" of foster care each year.1 Unlike many of their peers, who can count on their parents for a place to live or financial support, these young people are essentially on their own as...
Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.