Child Welfare

Child Welfare is a professional trade journal published bimonthly by the Child Welfare League of America, Inc., Arlington, Va. Founded in 1921, the journal provides policy, practice, and program information to professionals who work in the child welfare industry.

Articles from Vol. 94, No. 6, 2016

Assessing the Needs of Reunified Families from Foster Care: A Parent Perspective
Reunification following out-of-home placement (also called foster care) is a time marked by immense joy and tremendous stress for families. Children are returned to their families of origin in about one half of all out-of-home placements each year (U.S....
Family Finding Project: Results from a One-Year Program Evaluation
Connection to family has long played an important role in facilitating permanency for children in out-of-home care (Campbell, 2010; Hook & Courtney, 2011; Frey, Cushing, Freundlich, & Brenner, 2008; Samuels, 2009; Schofield, Beek, & Ward,...
From the Editor: It's Still All about Families
In preparing for this issue of Child Welfare, I was struck by the theme of families in each of these articles. Family-centeredness, family focus, families first, and many other terms have been hurled at the child welfare profession though the years....
Principled Quality Assurance in Child Welfare: A New Perspective
Quality Assurance (QA) is defined by the Council of Accreditation (COA) as "Distinguishing characteristics that determine me of degree of excellence and the mechanisms to efficiently and effectively monitor and improve customer care/service delivery...
Resources, Race, & Placement Frequency: An Analysis of Child Well-Being
The lack of information concerning child welfare outcomes has long been an area of interest to researchers, practitioners, and policy-makers (Courtney & Collins, 1994; Poertner, McDonald, & Murray, 2000; & McDonald, Lieberman, Poertner, &...
Transition-Age Foster Youth and Caregiver Perceptions of Self-Sufficiency
While there are ongoing policy efforts to find permanent homes for youth in foster care, some young people reach the point where they are "emancipated" into independent living with achieving permanency. This process, often referred to as "aging out"...
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