Estudios Irlandeses - Journal of Irish Studies

Articles from No. 4, Annual

32a
The mid-1990s saw a swathe of Irish coming of age dramas set in the 1950s which frequently (and often quite clumsily) sought to equate the experiences of their young, mainly male protagonists with the emergence of the state from its post civil war...
A New Female Art on Old Ground: Spanish Translations of Eavan Boland's Code
The following translated poems belong to Eavan Boland's 2001 collection Code (Carcanet) and they illustrate some of her main aesthetic concerns as well as certain thematic innovations in her mature work. By the time this volume was published, Eavan...
An Interview with Thomas Conway
Thomas Conway is Literary Manager of the Druid Theatre Company (Galway), independent director and lecturer of Contemporary Theatre in the National University of Ireland, Galway. He was born in Sydney but his family moved to Ireland when he was 5 years...
Bertie: Portrait of a Politician under Suspicion
As many commentators have pointed out, the mass media has helped to shrink the world to a global village, producing new forms of social relationships where people appear to achieve 'intimacy at a distance' with famous people. Richard Dyer for example,...
Cronica del Festival De Teatro De Dublin 2008
Last edition of the Dublin Theatre Festival (25 Sept.-12 Oct. 2008) featured a solidly orchestrated programme, full of highlights and stage quality. It was notoriously articulated by a series of proposals, tendencies, or common denominators, which...
Drawing Conclusions: Irish Animation and National Cinema
Traditionally perceived as the unclassifiable stepchild of many national cinemas, animation has recently become recognised as a form capable of astutely articulating and reflecting a nation's identity and concerns. In 2007, Persepolis (Vincent Paronnaud...
Entering the Dark Place: Visions of Irish Horror in Seer (2008)
There has been a recent explosion in Irish horror. McMahon's Dead Meat, made in 2004, was the first feature to be funded locally and inspired a new genre in Irish filmmaking. Like recent Irish horrors Isolation (O'Brien 2005), Shrooms (Breathnach 2007)...
Excavating Ireland's Contemporary Heritage in Eilis Ni Dhuibhne's the Bray House
Eilis Ni Dhuibhne's first novel, The Bray House (1990), is a futuristic, dystopian fantasy that envisages Ireland, Great Britain and most of Western Europe as laid waste by nuclear disaster sometime in the first decade of the twenty-first century....
Hireling Strangers and the Wandering Throne: Ireland, Scotland and Samuel Ferguson
In Samuel Ferguson's epic poem Congal, published in 1872, there are several curious moments of anachronism, where the archaic time of legend slips out of joint, and the poem gets distracted by its author's contemporary obsessions. It is no accident...
Hunger (2008)
In late December 2008 the British government released a new round of state papers under the 30-year rule. Among the files uncensored was a document from the office of the then British Prime Minister, James Callaghan, which revealed that the IRA had...
In Bruges (2008)
Martin McDonagh's success as a playwright has already elicited two volumes of essays (Chambers and Jordan 2006, Russell 2007), most of which locate him in a tradition of Irish drama. However, McDonagh has long professed a greater interest in cinema...
In the Beginning: Ardmore Studios Celebrates 50
2008 marked the fiftieth anniversary of the establishment of Ardmore Studios. 1958 was a year of contradictions and paradoxes in Irish culture and society; a country suspended between tradition and modernity. As the Harcourt Street railway line was...
Irish Film and Television Review 2008
The fortunes of Irish cinema took a paradoxical turn in 2008. Years of economic boom turned to bust and with it went long-held ambitions for a sustained period of cinematic creativity and even greatness. For most of a century the emergence--and then...
Kisses (2008)
By the time the national run of Lance Daly's well-received third feature, Kisses, had wound down, it seemed that more people knew about the off-set behaviour of the two juvenile leads, Kelly O'Neill (as Kelly) and Shane Curry (Dylan) than were familiar...
Language Image in National Minority Language Television Idents. TG4 (Teilifis Na Gaeilge, Ireland) and Whakaata Maori (Maori Television, New Zealand)
National television plays a key role in exploring central beliefs and versions of official and popular culture. The language used in broadcasting has huge symbolic importance. Negotiation between the national status of an official minority language...
Leaving Utopia Behind: Maria Edgeworth's Views of America
1. Introduction. Maria Edgeworth (1768-1849), a leading figure of Anglo-Irish literature, tried to promote industry, practicality and responsibility by following the utilitarian creed and the ideas inculcated by her enlightened father, Richard Lovell...
Meltdown Makeover: TV3's the Apprentice
The Apprentice unfolded as the nation's political economy unraveled. Shot between July and September 2008 and broadcast as the anchor of TV3's autumn schedule, what was then termed 'the coming recession' seeped slowly into the steep learning curve...
Nil Aon Tintean Mar Do Thintean Fein: Home Insecurity in Recent Irish Cinema
2008 saw the release of two feature films which focused on the home as a place of danger. Given Ireland's obsession with house-hunting and home-making over the past decade it is perhaps not surprising that cinema is beginning to reflect this aspect...
'Not Every Fairytale Has a Happy Ever After': Fairytale of Kathmandu (2008)
It must have seemed an enticing but simple prospect: make a film about your neighbour, a poet whose work you have loved since you were a student, whose simple bravery in coming out as a gay man in a rural Irish community has inspired you. Perhaps you...
Short Stories, Novels and Spain. an Interview with Colm Toibin
Colm Toibin (Enniscorthy, 1955) is the author of five novels, The South (1990), The Heather Blazing (1992), The Story of the Night (1996), The Blackwater Lightship (1999) and The Master (2004). This last novel won the IMPAC Dublin Literary Award, the...
Staging Space: Cinema, Image, and Text in Declan Recks' Eden (2008)
The admittedly hoary old chestnut of the relationship between film and theatre in Ireland has sprouted something new with Declan Recks' Eden. Irish film took second billing to Irish theatre throughout most of the twentieth century, with many of its...
Striapacha Tri Chead Bliain Duailcis (Prostitutes: Three Hundred Years of Vice)
A three-part documentary series written and directed by Virginia Gilbert, Striapacha: Tri Chead Bliain Duailcis (Prostitutes: Three Hundred Years of Vice), is an astutely crafted, honest and engaging account of prostitution in Ireland from the 18th...
... the Bad and the Ugly: Good Guys after All? Representations of Martin McGuinness and Ian Paisley in the English Press
The quality, quantity and tone of media coverage in Britain of Northern Ireland affairs is especially important since previous research has shown that the vast majority of British 'mainlanders' rely heavily on newspapers and television for information...
The Irish Phone Home: Reflections of Ireland in Jim Sheridan's in America
So complex, so tangled as if we have to wait on some riff of imagination to refract detail, some fiction to shape elusive meaning of fact (O'Siadhail 2002: 14) Jim Sheridan is one of the most important and prolific filmmakers in Ireland today, and...
The Short Film and Irish Cinema
A single chapter in Martin Mcloone's Irish Film (2000) aside, the short film form is one which has suffered a significant level of neglect within writing on Irish film. Despite the relatively high number of shorts produced in this country, and the...
Tom Jordan Murphy: An Appreciation
Mark O'Halloran opened a retrospective of Tom Jordan Murphy's work at the Irish Film Centre with an affectionate synopsis of the definitive elements of Murphy's acting abilities, but those seeking an illustration of the power the actor brought to the...
"Where Love Can Have Its Way": Conformity versus Resistance in Brendan Kennelly's Version of Federico Garcia Lorca's Blood Wedding (Bodas De Sangre)
There is little doubt that Brendan Kennelly's reputation mainly rests on his poetry, particularly the long sequences Cromwell (1983; 1987), The Book of Judas (1991a) and Poetry My Arse (1995). It would be fair to say that many of his early as well...
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