Americas (English Edition)

Articles from Vol. 55, No. 1, January-February

All-Aboard for the Sala Sao Paulo. (!Ojo!)
THE JULIO PRESTES Railway Station in Sao Paulo, Brazil, may be the only train terminal in the world that can boast of two types of conductors. One, wearing a military-style uniform adorned with brass buttons with a whistle at his lips, keeps the trains...
An International Facilitator. (OAS)
SECRETARY GENERAL Cesar Gaviria has been working to facilitate talks between the government and opposition in Venezuela, amid a climate of continued political tension. The negotiating process, which began in early November, suffered some delays...
Fine High Desert Wines: Argentine Winegrowers Blend Tradition and Technology on the Andean Slopes of Mendoza
Any Argentine winegrower wanting to count his blessings need only look up. "There," says winegrower Enrique Toso, pointing to the Andes towering behind his vineyards, "That's the source of our climate and our water." But the blessings that the Andes...
From the Editor
Life, it appears, involves a series of things lost and things gained. There are times when events, occurrences, and collective efforts imply both at the same time. And so in this issue of Americas a species saved, an industry revived, a symbol recorded...
From the Streets of Buenos Aires. (Outlook)
Daniel Cima, an Argentine photographer who resides in Washington, has spent the past eighteen years photographing around the world, principally for the Red Cross. Last August, he returned to Buenos Aires to visit his family, as well as to document...
Gato Barbieri: Master of His Own Beat. (Music)
Even the term "living legend" seems woefully inadequate when the subject at hand is Argentina's most famed jazz artist, Leandro Barbieri. Few if any instrumentalists in recent history have cast such a lasting spell on the international music scene...
Improving Systems to Cope with Climate. (OAS)
THE SAN JUAN RIVER Basin, shared by Costa Rica and Nicaragua, is the chief freshwater reserve in Central America, boasting rich and diverse ecosystems. Yet most of its one million inhabitants live in poverty, without access to safe water, sanitation,...
Is Culture a Barrier to Human Rights? (Inter-American Viewpoint)
Cultural diversity and its effects on the application of law are a topic of heated debate, not only in the field of human rights but also in public international law. In the realm of human rights, the fact that the concept of these rights was first...
Mine-Free Americas. (OAS)
NICARAGUAN DEFENSE minister Jose Adan Guerra urged the international community to continue its support for clearing land mines in his country, saying that more than $15 million is needed in the next three years to remove the remaining mines and implement...
Painter of Mysteries and Metaphors: Mexican-Born Artist Roberto Marquez Provides New Perspectives on Life's Often Dark Horizons, While Defying Definition
How doth the city sit solitary, that was full of people! She is become as a widow, that was great among nations! She that was a princess among the provinces is become tributary She weepeth sore in the night and her tears come on her cheeks ...
Paradise in Peril: Although Conservation Efforts and a Vast National Park Are Helping to Protect Natural Resources on the U.S. Virgin Islands, Increased Tourism, a Building Boom, and Other Pressures Threaten This Still Relatively Unblemished Territory
John King guided his boat slowly into the quiet waters of Maho Bay one day last July, cut the engine, and pointed to the pristine shoreline and the bays, inlets, and cays that shape St. John in the U.S. Virgin Islands. The view encompassed rocky offshore...
Protecting Human Rights Workers. (OAS)
THE STRENGTHENING of democracy in the Americas should bring respect for the work of human rights defenders, yet those who protect people's most basic rights continue to be vulnerable to intimidation, physical attacks, and even murder, the Inter-American...
San Juan Takes to the Streets. (!Ojo!)
THEY'RE DANCING in the cobble-stone streets of Old San Juan these days and around the shady square known as the Plaza de Armas. Young men and women dressed as plantation workers cavort with towering puppet figures, while masked rabble-rousers in polka-dot...
Through the Looking Glass of Ayacucho's Past: An Exhibition and Recently Published Book of Portraits by Photographer Baldomero Alejos Bautista Have Provided Residents of This Andean City a Mirror to Their Identity and Missing Links in Family Histories
Sarah Aymar Vargas never imagined that she would discover the identity of her great-grandfather at a seminar in Lima at the end of 2001. The daughter of a provincial family that had settled in the capital many decades earlier, Aymar Vargas one day...
Tropical Avenue of the Raptors: Twice a Year, Millions of Migrating Hawks, Falcons, and Vultures Help Link the Biological Heritages of Continental North and South America
We had just charged a little over a mile uphill through an organic cacao plantation on the Caribbean slope of Costa Rica. Our clothes were soaked in sweat, but we were happy. The destination for our trek, a small hillside opening, had come into view....
U.S. Food Fairs Well in Havana. (!Ojo!)
THEY WERE ONLY five months old, but Louise and Clarke--two female buffaloes from southern Minnesota--quickly became star attractions at the recent U.S. Food and Agribusiness Exhibition in Havana, Cuba. Even so, the pair of baby bison--along with...
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