Americas (English Edition)

Articles from Vol. 53, No. 5, October

A Mission of Confidence
AN OAS CIVILIAN Verification Mission plans to conduct three on-site visits this year to the Honduras-Nicaragua border to monitor compliance with confidence-building measures that the two countries have adopted. The first visit was in mid-July, with...
Books+Tortillas=Life
SALVADORAN librarians are strong defenders of the importance of books, reading, and libraries in national development and personal growth. As internationally renowned author Manlio Argueta, director of the National Library, once commented, "Books are...
Charting a Democratic Charter
OAS MEMBER countries have been polishing a draft Inter-American Democratic Charter, which aims to solidify and strengthen the commitment to democracy in the hemisphere. The OAS General Assembly, which met June 3-5 in Costa Rica, instructed the Permanent...
Cruising the River Sea
On numerous trips up the Amazon spanning over thirty years, our author captures the ebb and flow of Life along this complex waterway as far inland as Manaus She had a heavenly name, Stella Solaris. She was Greek. She weighed eighteen thousand tons,...
Curious Colorist of Customs
With a keen eye for detail, nineteenth-century Bolivian artist Melchor Maria Mercado recorded the popular traditions, landscapes, and political mood of the early republic During the nineteenth century, itinerant artists, called costumbristas, documented...
Delta in a Delicate Balance
Public and private groups on both sides of the U.S.- Mexico border are working to restore the once lush wetlands around the Colorado River mouth and to conserve this vital water resource Carlos Valdez-Casillas is angry and frustrated. Valdez stands...
FLYING WOMEN of Totora
My fellow passengers on the bus from Cochabamba were gaily dressed and spoke Quechua animatedly among themselves. We were on our way to Totora for the festival of the Swings of San Andres, perhaps the most original tradition in Bolivia. Once a year,...
For the Passion of Patagonia
Last April 28, a small plane bound for Patagonia crashed in the predawn, taking the lives of ten people. Four of them were bound, in the minds of those who knew them and their work, with that wild region that was their destination. They were journalist...
From the Editor
Tales of two great rivers, the Colorado and the Amazon, run through this issue. Flowing from the Rocky Mountains to the Gulf of California, the Colorado has become perhaps the most dammed up and strictly regulated river in the world. But with the greening...
Hispanics Heat Up the Ice
"BRODEUR LEAVES THE puck for Nemchinov, who passes across center ice to Holik at the blue line, who drops it in front of the goal to Gomez, who scores!" So went a typical play-by-play in the recent National Hockey League's Stanley Cup finals, which...
Latin America's Wide Screen
THE 2001 LATIN American Film Festival, which takes place September 13-23 in Washington, D.C., will highlight recent productions from fifteen countries. "This event offers the public in Washington the chance not just to see some new films, but to...
Managua's Home of Good Food
ABOUT FIFTEEN MILES from downtown Managua, at the end of a winding mountain road flanked by both crumbling shacks and elegant mansions, sits Al di La--one of the freest gourmet restaurants in Central America. But it's not just a restaurant. Al di...
Mechanisms to Combat Corruption
IN A MOVE TO strengthen anti-corruption efforts in the Americas, twenty-one countries recently established a follow-up mechanism to evaluate the progress being made in combating the problem. The mechanism is designed to help implement the Inter-American...
Moving Ice
"Ice walking is the only way of experiencing the glacier firsthand," says Luciano Pera, as he guides us, equipped with crampons and pickaxes, on the ascent along a ridge of the Perito Moreno Glacier. Pera is a pioneering figure in these parts; he made...
New Tracks for the Panana Canal
LAST SUMMER luxury trains began whisking passengers in style between the Atlantic and Pacific oceans, along a forty-seven-mile track that roughly parallels the Panama Canal. David L. Starling, president of the Panama Canal Railway Company, says...
Padre Patagonia: Explorer of Heavenly Peaks
A fearless trekker, Father Alberto Maria de Agostini left a valuable legacy as one of the first, and most inspired, documentarians of this rugged region He was neither the first nor the most famous voyager to fall victim to its mystical spell. But...
Shuttle Diplomacy in Haiti
SECRETARY GENERAL Cesar Gaviria has made several trips to Haiti in the months since the General Assembly instructed him to increase efforts to help resolve the political crisis in that country. In a preliminary report to the Permanent Council on...
The Will to End Torture Trade
Several related events recently took place that highlight the importance of the torture weapons trade, and the role that private companies in leading industrialized countries have in it. Their role was stressed in a document released last February...
Upfront
Puzzled Over Bissoondath Judging by the August 2001 interview in Americas, I must say that a dark streak of cynicism runs in Neil Bissoondath's literary family. In their books, he and his uncle V. S. Naipaul seem to derive a positively passive-aggressive...
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