Americas (English Edition)

Articles from Vol. 53, No. 3, May

All Fired Up in METEPEC
EVERY DAY REGARDLESS OF THE weather, a thousand suns rise and shine over Metepec, the celebrated craft center an hour's drive west of Mexico City. They're decorative ceramic suns, of course, complete with friendly faces in unglazed terra-cotta or garnished...
Argentina's Green Man for All Seasons
From startling public events to canvases and installations, Nicolas Uriburu has crusaded against man's destruction of nature A foliated face with verdant vines emanating from its mouth is an ancient, archetypal image suggesting humanity's oneness...
Caribbean Winds: Threats to National Security
For the governments of the small, English-speaking island nations of the Caribbean, the traditional concept of national security has less meaning in light of post-Cold War realities. These are countries set in the Caribbean Sea, with minimal defense...
Celebrating Diversity in Rhythm
Calle 54 (Blue Note 32000) On Calle 54, the soundtrack to the Miramax film of the same name, Academy Award-winning Spanish film director Fernando Trueba taps a wealth of Latin American talent for this joyful exploration of the Latin jazz movement....
Championing Democracy
IF REGIONAL organizations are to be effective and relevant, they must be active "champions of democracy," former U.S. secretary of state Madeleine Albright said recently at the OAS. Such organizations can help countries build stronger democratic institutions...
From the Editor
The world, including that of Islamic scholarship, recently expressed its outrage with the decision of the Taliban rulers of Afghanistan to destroy priceless ancient art, including the giant Buddhas of Bamiyan. The Taliban is a product of twenty years...
George Washington's Barbados Connection
ON NOVEMBER 2, 1751, two brothers arrived in Barbados after setting sail from their Virginia home. The elder, Lawrence, had fallen victim to tuberculosis, and doctors in Virginia had recommended a change of climate. Barbados had a long-standing medical...
MAGICAL Mummies of the Atacama
Modern research reveals that the ancient people of this coastal desert region of Chile developed the world's most complex methods for preserving the dead Two millennia before the Egyptians even began thinking of mummification, the Chinchorro, an...
On a Mission to Relive History
In public events this fall, Californians will reflect on their Spanish and Mexican heritage shaped by colonizers in the name of God and glory On the edge of the continent, seemingly imbued with limitless possibilities, the state of California has...
Poetic Fragments of a Hostess's Hillside
She knew Heitor Villa-Lobos well enough to pass out tickets at his first concerts, and any famous visiting artist or performer was likely to find a place at her table--from Enrico Caruso and Isadora Duncan to Anatole France. Rio de Janeiro's elites...
Puerto Rico's Spanish Virgins
IT DOESN'T TAKE an Einstein to figure out that the U.S. Virgin Islands are owned by the United States, and that the British Virgin Islands are owned by Great Britain. So who, then, do the Spanish Virgins belong to? Certainly not Spain. The geographical...
Razor-Sharp Peruvian Dance
THE GALA sampling last February that launched the four-year celebration of the Latin American arts at the John F. Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C., included a glimpse of the cultural phenomenon from northeastern Peru known as the scissors dance....
Right Agenda for the General Assembly
HUMAN RIGHTS will be at the top of the agenda when the OAS General Assembly meets in San Jose, Costa Rica, June 3-5. The Hemisphere's foreign affairs ministers will consider proposed reforms designed to strengthen the inter-American human rights system....
Supporting Dialogue in Haiti
IN AN ADDRESS to the OAS Permanent Council last March, Haiti's minister of foreign affairs, Joseph Philippe Antonio, said his visit was part of his country's "search for a consensual solution" to the political crisis stemming from Haiti's May 2000...
The Rubble-Rouser
THE MATRIARCH OF A COFFEE FARM SETS OUT TO REBUILD HER HOME AND TOWN AFTER THE DEVASTATING EARTHQUAKE IN EL SALVADOR On the morning of January 13, 2001, in Santa Tecla, El Salvador, the earth parted its jagged jaws and roared. My mother-in-law was...
Waste for Greening the Wastelands
FOR YEARS, efforts to revegetate some sixty-seven acres of tailings from the Pronto Mine in northern Ontario, Canada, stubbornly failed to produce results. The tract of waste material from the former copper mine remained a brown swamp of acidic water...
Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.