Americas (English Edition)

Articles from Vol. 56, No. 6, November-December

At the Service of Lenguaje Language: Translator Edith Grossman Enters the Minds of Her Masters, from Cervantes to Gabriel Garcia Marquez, to Create a Faithful, English Voice
"The translator is unappreciated," Valery Larbaud once wrote. "He is seated in the lowest. position; he lives so to speak on alms; he is willing to perform the humblest functions and to play the most unobtrusive parts. 'Be of service' is his motto,...
Falling for Tourists
THE TINY COUNTRY of Guyana, situated on South America's northeast coast, is called the "land of many waters" due to the large number of waterfalls, rivers, and wetlands found throughout the country. The most spectacular of all Guyana's water attractions...
Fresh Forms of an East-West Fusion
Mark Armanini is a naturally inquisitive composer whose forte is grand scale concepts. His passion is creating new music dialects and, more often than not, his work runs against the gram of long-entrenched conventions of the European classical music...
From the Editor
Frequently, as I reread the articles that comprise each issue of Americas in preparation for writing this letter, I am struck by some idea or concept that connects them. It comes as a surprise, since we strive to demonstrate a wide diversity of subjects...
Fueling Brazil's Future: The Development of an Alternative, Vegetable-Based Fuel Could Enhance This Nation's Economy While Protecting the Environment
In a spacious building on the campus of the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), huge, glistening stainless-steel tanks begin another busy day of experiments with vegetable oil. Although the pressure gauge on one tank displays the name Kibon,...
Islands Lure with History: With an Eye to Heritage Tourism and Long-Term Economic Development, Bahamians Are Preserving Unique Vintage Properties
Perched on a bluff above the bustling capital city of Nassau, on the island of New Providence in the Bahamas, historic Graycliff and its lush surrounding gardens were constructed by an early eighteenth-century privateer grown prosperous, like many...
Mixed Media with a Moving Message
Ten years after the worst terrorist attack in Latin American history, artist Mirta Kupfermine's memorial to its victims remains her country's most tangible, vivid reminder of that tragic day. It happened on July 18, 1994, at 9:53 a.m. Kupfermine...
New Age for an Ancient Culture
WHEN THE SPANISH conquered the Inca Empire in the sixteenth century, they found the city of Tiwanaku, located in the Bolivian highlands near Lake Titicaca, in ruins. However, at its apogee about A.D. 800, the sight was a different one indeed--a huge...
Oscar Niemeyer: Architect of Curves and Conviction: After over Seven Decades of Unending Creative Energy, Oscar Niemeyer Continues to Attract International Acclaim for His Revolutionary Designs That Have Shaped the Modern Face of Brazil
When the roster of the most influential architects of the twentieth century is recited, Brazil's Oscar Niemeyer is certain to be mentioned in the same breath with such internationally renowned innovators as Frank Lloyd Wright, R. Buckminster Fuller,...
The NBA's Shining Southern Stars
NOT LONG AGO, the biggest names on the world's most hallowed basketball courts reflected the game's North American heritage. Canadian born Dr. James Naismith is credited with inventing the game in the early 1890s in Springfield, Massachusetts, and...
Three Presidents Address Permanent Council
THE PRESIDENTS of three member states--Suriname, El Salvador axed Peru--addressed the OAS Permanent Council during separate protocolary sessions held September 24 in the Hall of the Americas. President Runaldo Ronald Venetiaan of Suriname called...
Virtual Masters in Drug Addiction Studies
In October 2002, a diverse group of 127 government officials, economists, lawyers, nurses, policemen, psychiatrists, social workers, and teachers embarked on a virtual educational voyage that would end almost two years later, at a ceremony held April...
Where Desert Meets City: Linked to the Harsh la Guajira Peninsula, These Native Peoples Face the Intersection of Tradition and Modernity
On the sandy, brush- and cactus-covered peninsula of La Guajira, the Epiayu family lives in adobe homes, raises sheep and goats, and cultivates beans, yuca, and corn. They live as their Wayuu people have done for countless centuries--but with a difference....
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