Americas (English Edition)

Articles from Vol. 46, No. 5, September-October

Caribbean Hot Sauce Industry Catches Fire
THEY CALL HIM THE "Peppa Mon" on this eastern outpost of the U.S. Virgin Islands. In the United States, he has a cult following; letters arrive weekly from fans pleading for more of his hot sauce. He's even gotten mail from Hong Kong. The Pepper Man,...
Llamathons Catch on in the Mountains of North America
NORTH AMERICAN mountain runners have created a new race form for one of the world's oldest domesticated animals: the South American llama. Nicknamed the "Ship of the Andes," the llama is used as a beast of burden to this day by Aymara and Quechua Indians...
Musings on the Massif
Considered by many to be the park of parks, Chile's Torres del Paine National Park mesmerizes the senses by its sheer, dramatic beauty On an autumn afternoon in Chile's Torres del Paine National Park, the sun is setting behind the mountains, back-lighting...
Notebooks from Brazil's Cerrado
The miracle of life after in the dry savanna is captured in the botannical paintings and sketches of ninety-year-old Maria Werneck de Castro Flames from a cattle rancher's torch spread along the surface of the cerrado, incinerating the low-lying vegetation...
Peru Scores Success with Asparagus Exports
TEN YEARS AGO, almost no one associated Peru with asparagus. Today, the Peruvians are quickly becoming world-class exporters of the fancy vegetable, with $60 million in 1993 sales alone. Exports will no doubt continue surging, thanks to the pro-business...
Peten Crafts a Future
In Guatemala's Maya Biosphere Reserve, residents are becoming pioneers in new techniques of sustainable living Islands, by their very nature, are fragile environments--surrounded, sometimes engulfed, other times stranded. The ancient Maya of northern...
Preserving Torres del Paine
Torres del Paine, probably the most famous national park in South America, is experiencing a tourist boom. Jovito Gonzalez, the park's chief ranger who has worked there since 1966, says the number of visitors has grown from a mere five hundred a year...
Sixty Years of Music at the OAS
Beginning in 1934, the OAS (then the Pan American Union) launched its musical endeavors by sponsoring free concerts featuring Latin American performers at its headquarters. At the time, more than one voice raised the question, "And where are they going...
Taking the Pulse of Population Growth
In Colombia, Profamilia's contributions to family planning and reduction of population growth have made it a leader worlwide Among South American nations, Colombia has some of the earliest evidence of human settlement--stone flakes from the El Abra...
The Deaths of Fortin Coronado
The confusion that the disappearance of Fortin Coronado has generated is truly incredible. The newspapers publish extensive articles about the possible reasons for his death, more preposterous than yesterday's and surely less bold and complicated than...
The Museo Jose Luis Cuevas
Editor's Note: Paco Ignacio Taibo I is a friend of Jose Luis Cuevas and has collaborated with the artist on two books, Taibo, Cuevas; Cuevas Taibo: Mano a Mano [Taibo, Cuevas; Cuevas, Taibo: Hand in Hand]and Retrato de Cuevas [Portrait of Cuevas], and...
Versions & Subversions
Suzzane Jill Levine, translator of Adolfo Bioy Casares, Manuel Puig, and many other Latin American writers, thoughtfully explores the nature of the translator's art "We translate to be translated," writes Suzanne Jill Levine in her book The Subversive...
Yesterday's Modern Images, Todays Archival Treasures
Recent studies of the fine works of Bolivia's first photographers are unveiling rich perspectives of nineteenth-century life In January 1840, some five months after Louis J. M. Daguerre's invention was announced to the world, the Franco-Belgian ship...
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