Americas (English Edition)

Articles from Vol. 42, No. 6, November-December

ABC
When we first learn to read, the letters are huge. The ones in the first-grade readers were enormous. The A was like a big tent, and the B--with its bulging bosom and even bigger belly--was larger still. The C, always ready to bite the letter that...
A New Species of Tourists
NIGHT FELL WITH a chorus of jungle sounds--birds, crickets, howler monkeys, and the rumbling thunder of a tropical rainstorm in the distance. A wooden canoe crept along the banks of a muddy Amazon estuary. Standing in the bow, a lookout scanned the...
Bait for Bucks
With a few notable exceptions, Latin American nations should take a holiday and "go fishing." It might be the most rewarding holiday of their history. The region is finally beginning to look seaward toward its maritime resources. But to date few...
Cesar Pelli Sculpts a Dramatic Skyline
ALL OF THE WORLD'S seaside cities have a special physiognomy. Barcelona, Hong Kong, Lisbon, San Francisco, Cartagena and Rio de Janeiro, among others, offer to those who approach them from the water, a unique and particular perspecitve with their hills,...
Electoral Observations
At the request of the government of Haiti, the Organization of American States (OAS) sent a team of approximately 200 people to observe the electoral process which culminated on December 16, 1990 with the election of Jean Bertrand Aristide. This mission...
Historian with a Brush
IMAGINE A WAR, over a century ago, that pitted land-locked Paraguay against the combined forces of Argentina and Brazil with Uruguay thrown in for good measure. Imagine again, the swamps and shallows of South America's "Mesopotamia," the Uruguay and...
No Chip off the Old Block
Some of the earth's finest old-growth forests are found in southern Chile, where they blanket steep coastal mountains and the countless islands of the Chilean archipelago. Comparable to the great ancient forests of North America's Pacific coast, the...
Running Down a Legend
ON NOVEMBER 7, 1908, two Bolivian policemen shot and killed a pair of North American bandits in San Vicente, a mining town in a barren, windswept bowl 14,000 feet up in the Andes Mountains. Although more than eight decades have elapsed, outlaw historians...
The OAS Welcomes Two New Members
On January 8, 1991 Belize and Guyana were ratified as the thirty-fourth and thirty-fifth members of the Organization of American States (OAS), at a Special Session of the OAS General Assembly. The Charter of the Organization was signed by the Minister...
The One-Man Band of Latin Jazz
On one recent drizzly day in San Francisco, Tito Puente walked casually into a recording studio to make yet another album of his patented Latin jazz. He also made history. With his latest release, the 68-year-old musician has likely accomplished...
Uncovering Columbus' Chambers
There soon may be a sign on the north coast of the Dominican Republic pointing toward an excavation and stating: "Columbus Slept Here." The site is called La Isabela--supposedly named by Columbus himself--and is located on the northwest coast one...
Uplifting Discoveries for Colonial Art
Would you believe that a valuable Latin American colonial painting served, for a time, as a cushion for an onion vender? Adoration of the Kings, a monument to 18th century Cuzco painting in the Frank Barrows Freyer Collection of Peruvian Colonial...
Upstream, Downstream
MOST TRIPS to the Amazon begin by flying to Manaus, the belle epoque jungle capital built some one thousand miles inland from the Atlantic Ocean. A more historically appropriate starting point however is near the river's mouth at Belem, a once resplendent...
Venezuela's Crude Gold Mine?
A tar-like substance found in the bitumen belt region near the Orinoco River could mean that Venezuela has the world's largest oil reserves--larger even than Saudi Arabia. No one knows for sure if the extra-heavy Orinoco oil will make a viable fuel....
XVI Century Vessels Take Their Bows on the High Seas
EVERY MIGRANT to the new world in the 16th century had to undergo trial by ordeal. Conquistador, friar, settler, slave . . . all had to cross the formidable North Atlantic in conditions only the desperate would endure today. Survival of the order...
Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.