Americas (English Edition)

Articles from Vol. 57, No. 6, November-December

A Shopping Spree at Borders Three
FOR YEARS, TWO WORLD-class attractions have lured tourists to South America's famed "Triple Frontier," the place where Argentina, Brazil, and Paraguay meet: the majestic Iguacu Falls and Binacional Itaipu, the world's largest hydroelectric dam. ...
Beijing's Buy-In
ENTERING THE SPACIOUS office of Roberto Pinto Ferreira Abdenur, Brazil's ambassador to the United States, the first thing you notice are the knickknacks--dozens of them. Typical of these is a bronze key to the City of Coral Gables, Florida, not far...
Bolivian Botanist with a Buzz: Bringing People and Plants Together, Ines Hinojosa Is Cultivating Cohesion and Leadership in Indigenous Communities with Her Revolutionary Approach to Sustainable Development
Ines Hinojosa Ossio, Bolivia's most prominent ethnobotanist, is not often found in the modest La Paz office of Tropico, the conservation organization where she is on staff, but usually out walking the country's forested research transects, along with...
Cutting to the Core of the Gang Crisis
In Latin America, some countries are experiencing a serious and alarming increase in crimes committed by youth gangs, called maras or pandillas. Recently released INTERPOL figures put the total number of gang members in Honduras, Guatemala, El Salvador,...
From Pop Crossovers to Jazz Journeys
Andrea Echeverri Andrea Echeverri (Nacional Records) Sara Valenzuela Lado Este (Nacional Records) Fernanda Porto Giramundo (Trama 978-2) Pop balladry appears to be taking on a new image, as studio wizards continue to make advances using electronic...
From the Editor
The elements of identity, of an individual or a people, involve many things--ethnicity, race, language, culture, memory. The efforts of individuals to express their identity or of groups to protect, validate, and assert theirs is one of the continuing...
Good Times in the Old Town
IT'S A BALMY SATURDAY evening on pint-size Plazuela Machado in the heart of Mazatlan's historic district. The adjacent sidewalks and streets are filled with brightly adorned cafe tables where scores of locals and tourists have come to dine. Steps away...
Mapping the Gran Sabana
When he was a young man back in the 1950s, Jesus Velasquez built his daub-and-wattle home on the banks of the dark and muddy Apanwao River, deep in the Grail Sabana. Velasquez chose his pata, his land, well. There were forests nearby with deep, black...
Path to the Summit
The hemisphere's ministers of labor, agriculture, and education have met in recent weeks to develop policies designed to carry out common goals. Such meetings have helped lay the groundwork for the Fourth Summit of the Americas, which will take place...
Proud Palestinians of Chile
AN OLD PROVERB IN CHILE goes that every small village in the country is sure to have three-things--a priest, a policeman, and a Palestinian. Surprisingly, this South American nation, the most distant point on earth from the Middle East, has become...
Roberto Aizenberg: Argentina's Visual Alchemist: This Master Surrealist Painted Provocative Works That Often Reflected His Personal Struggle and Despair While Conveying a Flesh, Innocent Vision
Solitary, geometric towers stand umber hued against an airy two-toned landscape, humorous headless figures, oddly costumed, are erect, even formal, against the nothingness. Light and space seem only to serve an overwhelming sense of solitude, of exile....
The Allure of Atwood's Toronto: Long a Destination for Writers and Literary Fans, This Eclectic City Has Provided the Setting for Many Popular Novels by Canada's Leading Author
"Literature is not only a mirror; it is also a map, a geography of the mind," wrote Margaret Atwood some three decades ago. If one were to map this novelist's territory, the physical borders would follow pretty closely those of a certain northern city...
Turning the Page on Mexican Women: Born to a Jewish Immigrant Family, Rosa Nissan Transcended Cultural and Personal Obstacles to Question the Traditional Role of Females in Works Celebrating Their Identity
When the Mexican film Novia que te vea [Like a Bride] made the rounds at Latino film festivals in the U.S. in the 1990s, some spectators were surprised. "I grew up in Mexico and I didn't know there were Mexican Jews," was an often-heard reaction. Obviously,...
Weighing the Costs of Disaster
IN RESPONSE TO THE widespread devastation and loss of life wrought on the U.S. Gulf Coast by Hurricane Katrina, Secretary General Jose Miguel Insulza expressed the condolences of the OAS community "as it joins the government and people of the United...
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