Americas (English Edition)

Articles from Vol. 57, No. 5, September-October

Assistant Secretary General Reaffirms OAS Aims
Ever since he was a teenager growing up in Suriname, Albert R. Ramdin wanted to be a diplomat. "Starting from a very young age, I read a lot of books," he says. "When I was fourteen, I read Das Kapital, most of which I did not understand." That...
Delivering Democracy
FOREIGN MINISTERS from the OAS member states convened for three days of intense debate about how to ensure that citizens benefit from democracy and how to build on the commitments established in the Inter-American Democratic Charter. "The Democratic...
Ecuador's Chocolate of the Earth
IN THE COCOA-GROWING region of Ecuador--just south of Guayaquil--five communities of farmers have formed business cooperatives to produce a native variety of cocoa (or cacao) that is revitalizing the Ecuadoran cocoa industry. The more than two thousand...
Famous Footsteps of a Stadium
WHAT DO FRANK SINATRA, Pope John Paul II, Madonna, the Rolling Stones, Pele, and the Reverend Billy Graham have in common? All have enthralled their adoring fans by the tens of thousands at Rio de Janeiro's Maracana, the world's largest soccer stadium....
Fruits of a Forest Farm
MOCOCA IS A handsome town with elegant French colonial-style homes around a central square. It is the heart of the Mogiana region, once famous for its coffee plantations. Situated in the hill country pressed up against the frontier of Sao Paulo and...
Gregory Rabassa: Words of Instinct: This Veteran Translator of the Most Celebrated Latin American Authors Continues to Open Fresh Perspectives on Contemporary Works
During Latin America's literary explosion, the "Boom" of the sixties and seventies, English-language readers came to know Gregory Rabassa well. His fluid translations captured every essential detail and nuance of masterpieces by Gabriel Garcia Marquez,...
Guyana Bets on Tourism
ORGANIZED, BIG-TIME gambling is about to come to the Caribbean nation of Guyana. That's the pledge of Manzoor Nadir, Guyana's Minister of Tourism, Industry, and Commerce. Sitting in the Caribbean between Venezuela and Suriname Guyana will have "its...
Isle of Mystery and Lore: Archaeologists and Historians Are Uncovering a Rich Body of Cultural and Natural Heritage on San Lorenzo, off the Coast of Lima, Peru
What secrets does San Lorenzo hide? Located in the Pacific Ocean only two and a half miles from Peru's capital, Lima, this island has long piqued the interest of scientists and travelers. In 2003, a team of Peruvian researchers from the Project for...
New Secretary General Targets Priorities
Jose Miguel Insulza, newly elected secretary-general of the OAS, says the thirty-four-member body will have to make some administrative, structural, and financial changes in order to stay relevant in the twenty-first century. "The OAS has four main...
Soaring Songs from the Motorcycle Diaries
In 1951, a trip on an old motorcycle up the spine of the Andes by an Argentine medical student and his companion sparked a succession of life-changing events that reverberate to this day throughout the world. Fifty-four years later, a Uruguayan doctor-turned-composer...
Talavera: A Family-Fired Craft: For Generations, la Trinidad Workshop in Puebla, Mexico, Has Preserved This Town's Age-Old Tradition in Distinctive Ceramics
It may be an earth-bound art, forged of clay, but talavera poblana is nothing less than ethereal. It was created in Puebla, after all, that is Puebla de los Angeles to be exact, and people here are used to asking for a little angelic intercession when...
The Olympus of Oaxaca: The Remains of Impressive Zapotec Temples and Pyramids at Monte Alban Testify to the Glorious Past of a Culture Whose Creativity Endures Even Today
Time may erode man's lesser achievements, but it enhances our appreciation of the few that are genuinely great. Such a place is Monte Alban, once the ceremonial capital of Mexico's Zapotecs, who labored under the sweltering Oaxacan sun to create an...
Unveiling Ancestors of the Mountaintop: Spurred by the Discovery of the Frozen Bodies of Three Inca Children, a New Museum in Salta Is Educating Argentines about Their Indian Heritage
THE PRIDE OF THE LOCALS showed on their faces as they toured the new museum, only opened in November of last year. This was themselves they were seeing, their culture, so long ignored and denigrated since the Spanish Conquest. Finally, here it all...
Visual Ethnographer of the New World
Dutch painter Albert Eckhout, who worked in Brazil in the mid seventeenth century, can justly be called the New World's first visual ethnographer, as well as a portrait artist nearly in the ranks of his contemporary and countryman Rembrandt van Rijn....
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