Americas (English Edition)

Articles from Vol. 51, No. 4, July

A High Altitude Congregation
MEMBERS OF the Circulo Israelita in La Paz like to joke that when praying, they feel closer to God than any other Jewish congregation in the world. After all, at an altitude of over twelve thousand feet, this is the highest synagogue on earth. It is...
Apocalypse in the Andes
For indigenous and tribal peoples all over the world, the end of this millennium seems to represent something of a historical crossroads. There is no longer an "outside" to the world economic system; there will be no more first contacts or first encounters--those...
Bolivia's Jurassic Tracks
IN SOUTHERN BOLIVIA a pair of dinosaur track finds are teaching paleontologists more about the end of the giant reptiles' reign. One of the sites, a cement quarry wall, is said to be the largest field of dinosaur tracks ever found. The other, still...
Eric Williams: Trinidad's Man for All Season
A scholar, politician, and international statesman, Eric Eustace Williams is also remembered as a warrior--"a tireless warrior in the battle against colonialism." The speaker of these words, a soldier himself--U.S. general Colin Powell--was commemorating...
Houses Built on Strong Foundations
IN SEVERAL NICARAGUAN communities hit hard by Hurricane Mitch, families who lost their homes have been working together to build new houses and rebuild their lives. The OAS is coordinating the construction of more than twelve hundred adobe homes...
Lorry Salcedo Portraits in Rhythm
"I think my life has been based on impulse, says Peruvian photographer Lorry Salcedo-Mitrani. He says that he decided to document Afro-Peruvian communities because no one had done it before. "It also seemed to be an interesting theme, a novel theme,...
Reviving HAITI'S Paradise
With unique resources, this country is poised to compete for investment capital and a booming Caribbean tourism market A growing number of adventure tourists are visiting Haiti these days. They are attracted by the country's original art, impressive...
Splendor of a Salt Sanctuary
The cathedral of Colombia's Zipaquira mine attracts religious pilgrims and tourists from around the world Just like his predecessors have done for over two hundred years, Jorge Castelblanco conducts his inspection tour of the mining project he supervises...
The Color of Healing
Central America's longest civil war cut into the heart of Guatemala's Maya people. For thirty-six years, fighting between the government-controlled army and peasant resistance groups stained the countryside red. The army enforced whims of the wealthy...
THE Greening of Carbon Trade
Creative research in climate change is promoting the exchange of gas-emission credits between countries, while conserving precious forests KEN MacDicken likes to show visitors his grandfather's spear. It is quite a piece of work: an authentic Filipino...
The Monkey's Man in the Yucatan
LIKE HIS ANCIENT Maya ancestors, Serapio Canul has a deep respect for the natural world. This respect has motivated him to take on a dangerous role as protector of the black-handed spider monkey in his jungle home on Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula. ...
Totora Meets the Open Sea
WHILE TRADITIONAL totora reed boats are disappearing from the waters of Lake Titicaca, the vessels are discovering a new role--or possibly rediscovering an ancient one--as transoceanic voyagers. In mid-April, one of the reed expeditions, the Mata...
Upfront
Americas' Eclectic Menu I am writing to congratulate you on Americas Magazine. I enjoy reading every article in the magazine. I read it was first published in 1949 and imagined how many magazines I would have if my parents had subscribed for me...
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