Americas (English Edition)

Articles from Vol. 60, No. 5, September-October

A Helping Hand
IN THE TEN YEARS it has been in operation, an OAS poverty-reduction fund has helped to create maps for the visually impaired, develop business skills among rural women, strengthen the competitiveness of small hotels, and give citizens tools to access...
An Elusive Passage Emerges
When Alejandro Malaspina and his crew set off from Mexico in search of the Northwest Passage, his expedition was one of many Spanish voyages sent to reconnoiter the northern reaches of the continent (and thus strengthen Spanish claims in the New World)....
A Second Turn at the Helm: Costa Rican President Oscar Arias Leads a Country Long Known for Its Progress on Peace and the Environment, but This Time around He Is Facing a More Polarized Society
[ILLUSTRATIONS OMITTED] Costa Rica is a delight for visitors--a place of tropical forests and volcanoes set between two oceans, with an extraordinarily beautiful and fertile central valley that is home to its largest population centers. It is a...
A Taste of Honey on Hispaniola
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Germinia Mercedes, a smiling matriarch in her sixties, shows visitors her small apiary, surrounded by flowering lipia and cambronal trees. Their sweet scent is heightened in the heat of Hispaniola, the island shared by the...
Aztec Wonders in Chicago
IN OCTOBER of this year, visitors to the Field Museum in Chicago will have the opportunity to view a never-before-seen exhibit about Mexico's ancient Aztec civilization. The new temporary exhibit, The Aztec World, includes priceless artifacts on loan...
Chronicle of a Rebirth
ONE OF THE MOST difficult challenges for a media outlet is to preserve its identity based on journalistic principles, independence, and style. The Colombian daily El Espectador--which has published in three different centuries, since it was founded...
Dancing to Almendra
On the same day Umberto Anastasia was killed in New York, a hippopotamus escaped from the zoo in Havana. I can explain the connection. No one else, only me, and the individual who looked after the lions. His name was Juan Bulgado, but he preferred...
Forgotten Voyage: You May Not Find His Name on the Map, but Alejandro Malaspina Is Finally Being Recognized for His Rigorously Scientific Exploration of the Americas in the 1700s
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Alejandro Malaspina has the dubious distinction of being the world's greatest explorer no one has ever heard of. An unfamiliar name except to aficionados of eighteenth-century naval, adventure, Malaspina led a five-year Spanish...
From the Editor
In the late eighteenth century, Italian-born explorer Alejandro Malaspina spent five years exploring the Americas for the Spanish Crown, sailing around Cape Horn and making his way up to Alaska. Writer Louis Werner guides us through this fascinating...
Ignacio Iturria: Painting from Memory
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Uruguay, that beautiful country in South America's Southern Cone, has a rich aesthetic tradition. A national iconography began to take shape with the works of the nineteenth-century painter Juan Manuel Blanes and the folkloric...
Making New Connections
ON A SATURDAY morning in El Alto, Bolivia, a group of men and women at the Interact cafe Scorpio stare intently at computer screens. Some of these users have never had Internet access before, but now they are learning about blogging, digital photography,...
Passion on the Page: Whether Set in Cuba or Haiti or Puerto Rico, Mayra Montero's Novels Depict Characters Consumed by Anxiety, Loss, and Desire
[ILLUSTRATIONS OMITTED] MAYRA MONTERO entered the hotel lobby with exuberance, her bright, youthful appearance giving no hint that she had barely gotten off a plane (squeezed into a middle seat, she sighed). Sporting slacks and a casual shirt, with...
Quinoa Comeback: A Staple in Inca Times, This Nutritious, Versatile "Super Food" Is Undergoing a Resurgence in the Andes and Beyond
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Five thousand years ago, the ancestors of the Inca people grew and ate a nutritious seed crop called quinoa. Although today it makes up only a tiny fraction of the worldwide whole-grain market, quinoa is experiencing tremendous...
Reinventing Guayaquil: Once Just a Seedy Seaport on the Way to the Galapagos, Ecuador's Largest City Has Come into Its Own with a Complete Makeover
"Guayaquil is not for the meek," declares a 1990s travel guide. Other guidebooks from that era warn visitors, "Go with friends" and "Be alert for pickpockets." One book, published in 1991, blithely assures readers that there are neither tourist attractions...
Scaling Poetic Heights
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] When it comes to Chile, it's not a bad idea to compare poets to mountains, especially when it comes to two giants of poetry such as Nicanor Parra and Gonzalo Rojas. The former is 94 years old and the latter 92, and both have...
Taking a Bite out of Malaria: Efforts in Mexico and Central America Are Demonstrating How to Fight This Debilitating Tropical Disease without Using Toxic Insecticides
[ILLUSTRATIONS OMITTED] Malaria is one of the world's most serious diseases in terms of its impact on human health. Although it claims more than a million lives a year--most victims are children--vaccines developed thus far have proven to be ineffective....
Threads of Time
TUCKED AWAY ON a quiet street in the upscale Miraflores neighborhood of Lima. Peru. the Museo Amano houses an extensive collection of pre-Inca textiles, amassed by a Japanese entrepreneur and amateur archaeologist who immigrated to Peru in the 1950s....
Trans-Atlantic Concern
NEW RULES to standardize procedures on the detention and repatriation of illegal immigrants in the European Union (EU) have raised concerns on the part of the GAS member states and the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (IACHR). In response...
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