Evelyn Waugh Newsletter and Studies

Articles

Vol. 41, No. 3, Winter

Evelyn Waugh's Central London: A Gazetteer
"I believe the parallelogram between Oxford Street, Piccadilly, Regent Street, and Hyde Park encloses more intelligence and human ability, to say nothing of wealth and beauty, than the world has ever collected in such a space before." So said Sydney...
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Was Evelyn Waugh in Danger of Being Shot by His Men?
I am very conscious that many Waughians, perhaps the majority, believe that Colonel Robert (Bob) Laycock had to place a guard over Evelyn Waugh's sleeping quarters to prevent his men shooting him; and that, if he went into action, he was liable to...
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Evelyn Waugh: A Supplementary Checklist of Criticism
This is a continuation of the earlier lists, published in Evelyn Waugh Newsletter and Studies. It contains books and articles published in 2009 as well as items omitted from previous lists. Begam, Richard, and Michael Valdez Moses, eds. Modernism...
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Vol. 42, No. 1, Spring

1066 and All That? History in Evelyn Waugh's Edmund Campion
Reviewing the American Edition of Edmund Campion for the New Yorker in 1946, Edmund Wilson, the eminent novelist and critic, wrote: "Waugh's version of history is in its main lines more or less in the vein of 1066 And All That. Catholicism was a Good...
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Hardcastle's Malleable Morris Cowley
A recent television ad shows a young man looking sadly from his two-door car to his pregnant wife and then resolutely pulling at the back of the car until it turns into a sedan. Something like this seems to have happened to Hardcastle's car in Brideshead...
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Additional Waugh Bibliography: Reviews of Brideshead Revisited
The following items are press cuttings sent to Evelyn Waugh at the time of publication with newspaper title and date. With three exceptions (noted below), they do not appear in A Bibliography of Evelyn Waugh. Barber, Frank D. "Picture of the Nobility."...
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Spanish Translations of Works by Evelyn Waugh: 1943-2011
If no translator appears in a later edition, it is assumed that the translation is the same, even though the publisher may have changed. As a rule, a different translator implies a different version, but one version may have different subsequent titles,...
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Abstracts of Japanese Essays on Evelyn Waugh, 1998-2010
Usui, Yoshiharu. "Chichi eno nagai michinori--Eyurin Wo Meiyonoken sanbusaku kenkyu [A Long Way to Fatherhood--A Study of Evelyn Waugh's Sword of Honour trilogy]." Seikei Jinbun Kenkyu [Seikei Journal of the Graduate School of Humanities] 7 (1998):...
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Decline and Fall
Decline and Fall, by Evelyn Waugh. The Old Red Lion Theatre, Islington. Reviewed by Mick Dempsey. With great anticipation I boarded the train from Metroland to central London on a bitterly cold December evening. I was on my way to see Evelyn Waugh's...
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Return of the Bright Young People
Glamour's Golden Years: Episode 2, "Beautiful and Damned." Dir. Colin Lennox. BBC4 TV. October 2009; repeated December 2010. Reviewed by Jeffrey Manley. This episode appeared as part of a series of three devoted to the cultural revolution that occurred...
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Vol. 41, No. 2, Autumn

'I Am Trimmer, You Know ...' Lord Lovat in Evelyn Waugh's Sword of Honour
Call me foolhardy, but I am resolved to boldly go where Paul Johnson has already been threatened with violence. Some years ago Mr Johnson recounted a conversation he had with Simon Fraser, 15th Lord Lovat in which Lord Lovat said that he had 'kicked...
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A Neglected Address: 25 Adam Street
In his Diaries for 6 July 1928, Evelyn Waugh writes that "Our honeymoon came to an end" and specifies that he (and presumably his wife, Evelyn Gardner) "Spent the following week at Hampstead," undoubtedly his parents' house. That would have occupied...
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The Ghastly Light of Television
In Their Own Words: British Novelists. Episode 1, "Among the Ruins: 1919-1939," 16 August 2010. Episode 2, "The Age of Anxiety: 1945-1969," 23 August 2010. Episode 3, "Nothing Sacred: 1970-1990," 30 August 2010. BBC4 TV. Reviewed by Jeffrey A. Manley....
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Vol. 41, No. 1, Spring

A Note on British Titles of Rank with Special Reference to the Works of Evelyn Waugh
Most Americans and nowadays some Britons are vague about the use of British titles. Since an untitled man may be referred to as either "Mr. Smith" or "Mr. John Smith," and his wife as "Mrs. Smith," "Mrs. John Smith," or "Mrs. Mary Smith," it is assumed...
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Lad Zap: Charles Ryder and a Holy Plot of Love
by A8041AA Less is Waugh and the slightest details of Evelyn Waugh's Brideshead Revisited (1945) may possess transcendent importance. Take the "meagre" possessions Charles Ryder sets out proudly in his chambers in his first term at Oxford. Inter...
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A Conversation at Anchorage House
Evelyn Waugh's satirical novel Vile Bodies is filled with numerous passages that have captured the attention of readers since the story was published in 1930. Critics have debated the importance of Adam's "vile bodies" reflection in chapter VIII, the...
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Abstracts of Japanese Essays on Evelyn Waugh, 1970-1977
Evelyn Waugh's first two novels do not suggest any moral decision in a world without order and value. He does not protect anyone or anything with faith, creed, or dogma. His attitude is also ambivalent. In this sense, the novels are not legitimate...
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Vol. 40, No. 3, Winter

Paul A. Doyle
Paul A. Doyle, founder and editor emeritus of Evelyn Waugh Newsletter and Studies, passed away on 22 July 2009. He was 83 years old. Paul Doyle earned a bachelor's degree from the University of Scranton and master's and doctor's degrees from Fordham...
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Evelyn Waugh: A Supplementary Checklist of Criticism
This is a continuation of the earlier lists, published in Evelyn Waugh Newsletter and Studies. It includes books and articles published in 2008, as well as some items omitted from previous lists. Arai, Toshiko. "An Observation of the Religious Structure...
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Vol. 40, No. 2, Autumn

Court of Inquiry: Additional Waugh Bibliography
Bibliographers have overlooked a review-with-reminiscences that contains intriguing information about Waugh's being the subject of a military Court of Inquiry: viz. Bernard Fergusson's "Gentlemen at Arms," a review of To the War with Waugh, by John...
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Ambrose Silk, the Yellow Book, and the Ivory Tower: Influence and Jamesian Aesthetics in Put out More Flags
Contemporary reviews of Waugh's Put Out More Flags were hesitant to attribute to Ambrose Silk any role greater than that of buffoon. Kate O'Brien's review in the Spectator, 3 April 1942, writes Ambrose off with one sentence: 'And there is a new character,...
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Sword of Honour: Identity and Possession
Evelyn Waugh's Sword of Honour details Guy Crouchback's journey of self-discovery. Throughout the trilogy, the reader witnesses Guy's growing understanding of identity, complemented by a developing sense of the use of possessions. By witnessing Guy's...
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Charles Edward Linck, Jr., 1924-2009
Charles Linck, who died on 21 August 2009, was a member of the pioneering generation in American Waugh studies. He was one of the first people chosen by Paul A. Doyle, the founder of Evelyn Waugh Newsletter, to serve on the editorial board. He and...
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Abstracts of Japanese Essays on Evelyn Waugh, 1955-1961
Uramatsu, Samitaro. "Shinku, Keiren, Gyouketsu: Evelyn Waugh, 'Officers and Gentlemen,' 1955 [Vacuum, convulsion, and coagulation: Evelyn Waugh, Officers and Gentlemen (1955)]." Gakuto [Learning stirrups] (Tokyo) 52.12 (1955): 22-24. Abstract: Evelyn...
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Vol. 40, No. 1, Spring

The "Red-Knee'd" Officer: Evelyn Waugh's Cameo Appearance in Ferdinand Mount's Novel, the Man Who Rode Ampersand (1975)
Ferdinand Mount has worked as a journalist, a non-career civil servant, a political consultant to the Conservative Party, and editor of the Times Literary Supplement. He has also written seventeen books, including eleven novels. The second novel is...
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Latin America: Ignorance and Irony in the Loved One
Aimee Thanatogenos "spoke the tongue of Los Angeles" (134), but not the tongue of the angels. That is the crux of The Loved One (1948), Evelyn Waugh's satiric novella of American funerary customs. "With a name like that" (148), she is doomed from the...
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Telling It like It Wasn't
Brideshead Revisited, dir. Julian Jarrold. Writ. Andrew Davies and Jeremy Brock. Ecosse Films, 2008. Reviewed by Donat Gallagher, James Cook University. In 1963 a kindly Professor of English ignored prevailing opinion that Waugh was "too lightweight...
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Just about Right
Scoop. BBC Radio 4, 15 & 22 February 2009. Reviewed by Jeffrey A. Manley. Radio 4 broadcast a two-part, two-hour production of Scoop. The script was written by Jeremy Front, who has also written for TV serials such as Monarch of the Glen and...
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Abstracts of Japanese Essays on Evelyn Waugh, 1948-1959
S. Y. "Evelyn Waugh no Ninki―Sekaibungakutsushin (Igirisu)" ["Popularity of Evelyn Waugh--World Literary Correspondence (Britain)"]. Sekaibungaku [World Literature] 25 (1948): 24-25. Abstract: To say nothing of venerable authors such as...
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Evelyn Waugh: A Supplementary Checklist of Criticism
John Howard Wilson Lock Haven University of Pennsylvania This is a continuation of the earlier checklists published in Evelyn Waugh Newsletter and Studies. It includes books and articles published prior to 2005 and omitted from earlier lists. ...
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