The Conradian : the Journal of the Joseph Conrad Society (U.K.)

Articles

Vol. 41, No. 1, Spring

"Dirty Weather": Typhoon's Meteorology and MacWhirr's Point of View
"OBSERVING THE STEADY fall of the barometer, Captain 1 MacWhirr thought, "'There's some dirty weather knocking about'" (Typhoon, 20). For Captain MacWhirr of Conrad's Typhoon (1902), the typhoon - as "dirty weather" or "that dirt" (32) - is without pattern...
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Conrad's One Day More and the Speaker: A Suppressed Review
CONTEMPORARY REVIEWS of Conrad's writings, such as are collected in the four-volume Cambridge Edition (2012), help us to follow in strikingly close detail the first critical reception of the writer's work. However, this close-woven history of early reception...
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Three New Conrad Letters, 1899, 1910 and 1913
The three previously unpublished letters printed below, all to known Conrad correspondents, have featured in recent auctions. They appear here by kind permission of the Estate of Joseph Conrad as represented by Cambridge University Press, and follow...
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Conrad's "An Anarchist": Footnotes to Norman Sherry
A PIONEER of the sophisticated academic study of Conrad's œuvre, Norman Sherry in his two investigative monographs Conrad's Eastern World (1963) and Conrad's Western World (1971) offered resources that remain valuable to the historically inclined critic,...
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Conrad Writing Photography: Authenticity and Identity in the Inheritors and "The Black Mate"
A PHOTOGRAPH OF the future Joseph Conrad was taken in 1863, when he was six years old.1 On the back he wrote, in Polish, a note to his grandmother. The translation reads: "To my dear [Grandmama], who helped me send pastries to my poor Daddy in prison...
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Conrad's Mastery of Language in Early Marlow Narratives: The Functions and Effects of Comparisons
CONRAD'S STYLE has been subject to various analyses and generated a wealth of contradictory opinions. Early critics and readers focused on its subjectively felt uniqueness. The reviewer of "Youth" observed: "In more ways than one Mr. Conrad is something...
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Conrad's Visit to Captain Blake: Narrating Memory in the Mirror of the Sea
ON A SUMMER'S DAY in 1886, Józef Korzeniowski, not yet Joseph Conrad, made his way from his lodgings in Stoke Newington to 88 Cleveland Road, Wanstead.1 The purpose of his journey to this solidly middle-class district, then in the county of Essex but...
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Conrad Studies in Mainland China, 1924-2014
(ProQuest: ... denotes non-USASCII text omitted.)THIS ESSAY REPORTS on the state of Conrad studies and translations in mainland China since 1924, dividing the ninety-year period since Conrad's death into three stages. Stage 1, from 1924 to 1949, saw...
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Semeiotic Density in Almayer's Folly
IF THE PLEASURE of the text is to be found in sound, it can be equated neither with the relief provided by plots, suspense, or characters, nor with the pleasure of bombast and other so-called literary flourishes. 'Sound pleasure' is not autoerotism.1...
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Why Jessie Conrad Was Not a Professional Typist
J H. STAPH WAS the first biographer to challenge the long-held as sumption that Joseph Conrad's wife (née Jessie Emmeline George, 1873-1936) was a professionally trained typist, on the grounds that her typescripts contain too many errors and that she...
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Conrad, E. L. Sanderson, and the Wooing of Helen Watson
CONRAD ALWAYS LOOKED back on his time (1891-93) as first mate in the Torrens, a magnificent passenger-clipper on the London-Capetown-Adelaide run, with great affection and as "marking the end of my sea-life with ... pleasant memories and precious friendships"...
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Vol. 40, No. 2, Autumn

Mystery
("Joseph Conrad")I HADN'T SEEN Burleigh for some five years or more when I found him waiting for me that fine light evening in the long low-roofed room with the red curtains - all sailormen know it - at the back of "The Ebb Tide." The front rooms of...
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Conrad Remembered: Richard Curle Meets S. N. Behrman and Crosby Gaige
THE PLAYWRIGHT, screenwriter, and essayist S(amuel) N(athaniel) Behrman wrote towards the end of his life that "An odd quirk of my destiny has put a great many people in my way" (1972: 5).1 Destiny in this instance served Behrman's acquaintances as handsomely...
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Notes on J. M. K. Blunt of the Mirror of the Sea and the Arrow of Gold
In memoria del mio amico italiano, Mario Curreli, studioso e gentiluomoDespite Jerry Allen's extensive discussion of J. M. K. Blunt, as he is generally known to Conrad scholars (he styled himself J. Y. Mason Blunt), the man who appears briefly in The...
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An Unpublished Conrad Letter to F. N. Doubleday of 1914
WHEN CONRAD says in the letter below to his American publisher, Frank N. Doubleday, that "all my literary life has passed now into your hands," he meant it quite literally. In 1914, Doubleday, Page & Company not only brought out Chance, but was also...
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The New Cambridge Text of Victory
For Owen Knowles and Allan H. Simmons, with gratitudeA Scholarly Generation Ago, one could talk with some confidence, and even rather blithely, of "the text" of a novel or a poem or any other work of literature or piece of writing. We now know that these...
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"All Those Figures": Conrad's Board of Trade Examinations Re-Examined
"You have fourteen minutes yet." I looked at the face of the clock; it was round like the moon; white as a ghost, unfeeling, idiotic. I sat down under it with the conviction of the crushing materiality of Time ... For no man could have gone over all...
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The Revolutionary Pole in Late Victorian/Early Edwardian Dynamite Fiction
AT THE END of the nineteenth and beginning of the twentieth centuries, the figure of the revolutionary Eastern European is ubiquitous in a certain kind of popular literature. Those commonplace figures are often Nihilists, enthusiasts, or something along...
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The Case of Mrs Schomberg in Victory
"One was inclined to think of her as an It - an automaton, a very plain dummy, with an arrangement for bowing the head at times and smiling stupidly now and then."Victory (1915)CONRAD'S LATE FICTION repeatedly returns to versions of the female dummy,...
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Conrad and the Great War at Sea
CONRAD'S IMAGINATIVE relation to the nautical dimension of the First World War remains one of the less thoroughly explored areas of criticism. After all, only one of his fictional works, "The Tale" (1917), explicitly addresses the Great War at sea, and...
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Victory in a Zone of Indistinction: Animals, Alfuros, and Agamben
I.Creaturely LifeAXEL HeysT has RETREATED to the round island of Samburan, two or three days by sail from Sourabaya, in eastern Java. The island's topography rather resembles a simple four-point compass rose: a circle bisected by a central ridge running...
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Volcanoes, Disaster, and Evil in Victory
IN Evil in Modern Thought (2002), Susan Neiman treats the Lisbon earthquake of 1755 as an important moment in the evolution of reflection on the subject of evil, noting that the event instigated a divergent "shift in consciousness" in which "natural...
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Vol. 40, No. 1, Spring

"Arrows by Jove!": Delayed Miscoding in "Heart of Darkness"
WHILE NAVIGATING the snake-shaped river in the primeval and foggy landscape of "Heart of Darkness," Marlow observes objects whizzing and swarming around his sluggish, beetle-like steamer. He struggles to name these puzzling objects. At subsequent points,...
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Ciceronian Oratory and the Idea of Civilization in "Heart of Darkness"
THE STATUS OF LANGUAGE and, specifically, of the "savage discords" of the Congolese tribesmen is a recurrent topos in "Heart of Darkness" (83), as it has been in the existing criticism. The way in which Conrad describes the native language - "A violent...
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Two Unpublished Conrad Letters and Two Unpublished Notes: 1898–1923
THE MISCELLANEOUS COLLECTION of Conrad correspondence printed here for the first time comprises two letters and two notes. Addressed to four correspondents on matters professional and personal, the missives offer a snapshot of Conrad's life at moments...
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"The Wisdom of the Race": An Uncollected Conrad Text of 1921
A GENERATION HAS PASSED since the last uncollected Conrad text was brought to light in Zdzislaw Najder's anthology The Congo Diary and Other Uncollected Pieces by Joseph Conrad (1978). In the interim, scholars have identified numerous new letters but...
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"Cher Monsieur": ÉMilie Briquel's Letters to Joseph Conrad
FLIRTATION seems an apt word for Conrad's relationship with Émilie Briquel, the twenty-year-old French woman whom he met at the Hôtel-Pension La Roseraie on the outskirts of Geneva in May 1895 whilst he was undergoing hydropathic treatment. The relationship...
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Reminiscence and Retrospection: Three Meetings with Conrad
LIKE HIS OWN Lord Jim, Conrad has been vividly remembered "many times, in distant parts of the world ... at length, in detail" (30.38-40) as Martin Ray's (2007) bibliography of reminiscences testifies. Three items missing from this and any other reference...
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Conrad's Wamibo: Crime, Punishment, and the Loch Etive
THE SUBJECT OF THEFT aboard ship is vividly broached in The Nigger of the ""Narcissus," with the sentimental Belfast "boning" the officers' Sunday night fruit pie to give to James Wait. Underlying this semi-comic act of moral and political rebellion...
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Civic Virtue in under Western Eyes
IN PART IV of Under Western Eyes, the narrative circles back to Councillor Mikulin's interview with Razumov where the latter tries to defend his political neutrality and detachment from the conflicting claims of autocracy and revolution: "But Councillor...
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Five New Conrad Letters, A Misdating Corrected, and an Epistolary Spoof
SINCE THE PUBLICATION of the final volume of The Collected Letters of Joseph Conrad in 2007, some fifty unpublished letters have come to light, all of them appearing, as by arrangement with The Conrad Estate and Cambridge University Press, in The Conradian1...
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"A Variable and Yet Perfectly Precise Mechanism": Temporal Prosthesis in the Secret Agent
THE CONCLUSION of Christopher Hampton's 1996 film adaption of The Secret Agent deviates from the original in a way that might surprise the novel's readers. The film, like the novel, ends with the bomb-making anarchist, the Professor, walking anonymously...
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S. S. McClure, the Conrad Circle, and the Messy London Season of 1909
IF WE ARE to believe Violet Hunt, Conrad never "cared very much for the idea of America" (1926: 36). Such a political view, if held by Conrad, may have influenced his personal relations with certain Americans, not fellow writers so much as those in the...
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Additional Supplementary Notes and Corrigenda to the Collected Letters of Joseph Conrad
THE LATE Martin Ray's supplementary notes to The Collected Letters of Joseph Conrad (Cambridge University Press, 1983-2007), published in the Autumn 2008 issue of The Conradian (33.2) provided the model for the further information supplied in a first...
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A Glimpse of Conrad in 1912
VOLUME SEVEN of Norman Douglas: Selected Correspondence (Allan, ed., 2014) - an on-going series published under the auspices of the Norman Douglas Research Centre at the Vorarlberger Landesbibliothek in Bregenz - is devoted to the correspondence of the...
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Vol. 39, No. 2, Autumn

Conrad to the New York Times: An Unpublished Letter of August 1901
THIS PREVIOUSLY UNPUBLISHED letter to the New York Times accompanied Conrad's contribution to the New York Times Saturday Review of Books and Art also dated 2 August 1901. The latter was his response to a review of The Inheritors that had appeared in...
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Art out of Bread-Winning: Conrad and the Question of the Plimsoll Man
THIS ESSAY'S STARTING POINT is the question of whether Conrad's portrayal of the Plimsoll man in The Nigger of the ""Narcissus" may be dismissed as irredeemably reactionary and conservative and what this might mean, more generally, for a reading of this...
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Conrad and Captain Marris: A Biographical Note
Dedicating A VOLUME to someone is usually an act of gratitude and a testimony to close friendship or is an act of homage that partakes of both of these. Conrad's dedications prove no exception to this rule with both his personal friends - Adolph Krieger,...
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Four New Conrad Items in the Late Stanley J. Seeger Sale of Conradiana
BILLED AS "the greatest single author collection pertaining to a modern writer to come to auction within living memory" by Sotheby's Books and Manuscripts Senior Specialist Peter Selley (Brown 2013), the sale of the late Stanley J. Seeger's Joseph Conrad...
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The Readable across "Heart of Darkness"
"HEART OF DARKNESS" is almost neurotic in its attention to the limits of the narratable, the difficulty of articulation, and obstacles to comprehension. As a result, that which is narrated and understood without marked effort acquires an exceptional...
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The Cambridge Edition of the Works of Joseph Conrad
The Cambridge Edition of the Works of Joseph Conrad The Shadow-Tine: A Confession Edited by J. H. Stape and Allan H. Simmons, with an Introduction by Owen Knowles Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2013 lvii + 287 pp. ?70/$120FIRST PUBLISHED IN book...
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Conrad and "Europe's Greatest Feminist"
CONRADIANS have long speculated about a "source" for Peter Ivanovitch in Under Western Eyes. They have suggested Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, Kropotkin, Bakunin, Gubaryov in Turgenev's Smoke, Felix Volkhovsky - even Ford Madox Hueffer,1 but none quite lives...
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The Secret Secret Sharer
The subject of this essay is a secret.Conrad wrote "The Secret Sharer" in late 1909, after a visit from Captain Carl M. Marris of Penang revived memories of his own adventures in the East as a young man. It was also as a distraction or relief from his...
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"Joseph Conrad's" Typewriter at the Canterbury Heritage Museum
IN HIS BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH of Conrad's secretary, Lilian Mary Hallowes, David Miller claims that the "Corona typewriter" that she "used for Mr Conrad's work" and that she requested back a month after the author's death "is currently on exhibit" in the...
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"It Was Very Quiet There": The Contaminating Soundscapes of "Heart of Darkness"
TO A significant extent, "Heart of Darkness" is a story about resistance to sensory input. Far from being a narrative communicated through sense impressions, the story is related mainly through a consciousness that is trying to avoid engaging with the...
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Figure and Ground in "Heart of Darkness"
THE SUPPOSED SINKING of the Patna in Lord Jim illustrates the power of belief. Fearing that the ship is sinking, Jim and other crew members jump overboard. Then, shivering in a lifeboat, and thinking they have narrowly escaped drowning, the shaken men...
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