The Conradian : the Journal of the Joseph Conrad Society (U.K.)

Articles from Vol. 33, No. 1, Spring

Alice Kinkead and the Conrads
AMONG THE NEW FRIENDS of Conrad's last years was Alice Sarah Kinkead, a little known Irish artist who painted the writer's last portrait. She was born in 1871 in Tuam, County Galway, the daughter of Dr Richard John Kinkead, a general practitioner, by...
Conrad and "Civilized Women": Miss Madden, Passenger on the Torrens
"MISS MADDEN" was one of the half-dozen passengers on the Torrens with whom Joseph Conrad maintained some contact after leaving the ship in 1893. The purpose of this note is to provide biographical information about her and to advance understanding of...
Conrad and Exploratory Science
IN HIS PREFACE to The Nigger of the 'Nardssus" (1897), Conrad described something that for the moment will remain unnamed asa single-minded attempt to render the highest kind of justice to the visible universe, by bringing to light the truth, manifold...
Conrad and the Minesweeper's Gazette : A Note
IN TWO PREVIOUS ISSUES of The Conradian, Donald W. Rude has pursued an enquiry into what he initially assumed to be an unlocated Conrad "essay" of July 1918 tided "Hyde Park Mansions" (1984, 1991). He was first alerted to the item by an entry in a Sotheby's...
Conrad's Arrow of Gold
TWO OF CONRAD'S late works began life in the 1890s, being abandoned for two decades before their resuscitation. The Rxscue famously caused its author much heartache, painfully reported in missives to Garnett and Cunninghame Graham, and was finally completed...
Conrad, Schopenhauer, and le Mot Juste
THE FORMATIVE INFLUENCE of Arthur Schopenhauer on the writings of Joseph Conrad, especially in the 1890s, has been the subject of extensive debate for forty years, and it is quite clear that Conrad was highly familiar with the ideas and works of the...
Conrad's Early Reception in America: The Case of W. L. Alden
As a vigorous and positive force in American and English journalism of the last quarter of the nineteenth century, Mr. Alden will be remembered.The National Cyclopedia of American BiographyCONRAD'S REPUTATION in America began to flower with the popular...
Joseph Conrad and Germ Theory: Further Thoughts
PERHAPS TWO HOURS after my copy of the Autumn 2006 issue of The Conradian arrived in the mail, I received an e-mail message from Cedric Watts, complimenting me on my essay on The Nigger of the "Narcissus", "Joseph Conrad and Germ Theory: Why Captain...
Joseph Conrad at the London Sailors' Home
I am not likely to forget my early days in Well Street and the good will shown to a stranger by all there - and especially by your late Father, who so kindly assisted me in becoming (I hope not an altogether unworthy) British subject; and your own uniform...
Marguerite Poradowska as a Translator of Conrad
THE FIRST REFERENCE to a possible "translation" of Conrad's work by Marguerite Poradowska occurs in a letter of [30 July 1894] (CLl 164) related to Almayer's Folly, which Conrad was then desperate to see published. In the throes of doubt at this critical...
"The Fitness of Things": Conrad's English Irony in "Typhoon" and the Secret Agent
"I was not fully aware how thoroughly English the Typhoon is. I am immensely proud of this, of course. There are passages that simply cannot be rendered into French - they depend so much for their meaning upon the very genius of the language in which...
"Who's That Fellow Lynn?": Conrad and Robert Lynd
ROBERT LYND'S REVIEW of A Set of Six in the Daily News on 10 August 1908 holds a special place in critical writing about Conrad. Zdzislaw Najder claims that "there is a link between Lynd's painful attack and the genesis of A Personal Record' (1983; rev....
Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.