Stanford Law Review

Stanford Law Review is a journal on law published bi-monthly by Stanford Law School, in Stanford, Calif., for lawyers, law teachers and law students.

Articles from Vol. 52, No. 6, July

Conceptualizing Corporations and Kinship: Comparative Law and Development Theory in a Chinese Perspective
There is only a perspective seeing, only a perspective knowing.(1) --Friedrich Nietzsche Ideas and ideologies shape the subjective mental constructs that individuals use to interpret the world around them and make choices.(2) --Douglass...
Let Them Eat Cake: Diabetes and the Americans with Disabilities Act after Sutton
INTRODUCTION The [Equal Employment Opportunity Commission] guidelines' directive that persons be judged in their uncorrected or unmitigated state runs directly counter to the individualized inquiry mandated by the ADA.... For instance, ...
Punitive Damages and Deterrence of Efficiency-Promoting Analysis: A Problem without a Solution?
I. INTRODUCTION Professor Viscusi addresses an important concern, namely, that economic efficiency can be undermined by the threat of punitive damages because of a well-executed, socially oriented risk or benefit-cost analysis.(1) While Viscusi...
Russian Privatization and Corporate Governance: What Went Wrong?
I. INTRODUCTION Rapid mass privatization of state-owned enterprises in formerly centrally planned economies hasn't turned out the way its creators hoped, in Russia or elsewhere. When Russian mass privatization began in the early 1990s, its proponents...
The Costs and Benefits of Letting Juries Punish Corporations: Comment on Viscusi
On the basis of a new survey-administered mock juror experiment, Kip Viscusi suggests that a corporate defendant "[u]ndertaking even a sound risk analysis in line with that used by government regulators" actually increases the magnitude of punitive...