Stanford Law Review

Stanford Law Review is a journal on law published bi-monthly by Stanford Law School, in Stanford, Calif., for lawyers, law teachers and law students.

Articles from Vol. 53, No. 2, November

A Buy-Side Model of M & A Lockups: Theory and Evidence
INTRODUCTION Lockups(2) are an increasingly important element of M&A deals in the United States. In friendly U.S. mergers greater than $50 million in value, lockups appeared in 80% of deals in 1998, compared to 40% of deals a decade ago.(3)...
Accommodation Mandates
INTRODUCTION Legal requirements that employers provide specified benefits to their workers, such as workers' compensation and family leave, are virtually omnipresent in modern employment law. Some mandates are directed to workers as a whole, and...
Democracy and Distrust after Twenty Years: Ely's Process Theory and Constitutional Law from 1990 to 2000
INTRODUCTION The Constitution speaks in terse, general language. Yet it is this language that the nine unelected, life-tenured Justices of the Supreme Court must interpret when they strike down democratically produced laws. Judicial review is necessary...
Ferguson V. City of Charleston, South Carolina: "Fetal Abuse," Drug Testing, and the Fourth Amendment
INTRODUCTION In June 1991, Crystal Ferguson was tested for drag use during a routine prenatal checkup at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) in Charleston, South Carolina. She never consented to be tested. Confronted by hospital staff...
Takings, Trade Secrets, and Tobacco: Mountain or Molehill?
INTRODUCTION Passed in 1996, chapter ninety-four, section 307B of the Massachusetts General Laws (hereinafter "the Disclosure Act" or "the Act") imposes two substantive requirements on manufacturers of cigarettes and other tobacco products selling...