Applied Health Economics and Health Policy

Articles from Vol. 7, No. 4, December

A Comparison of Costs among Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Who Initiated Therapy with Exenatide or Insulin Glargine
BackgroundType 2 diabetes mellitus is a prevalent and costly disease in the US.[1] In 2007, 17.5 million people in this country had a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes, and acute care costs of the disease totalled $US174 billion, including $US116 billion...
Assessing Comparative Effectiveness Research in the US
In 2000, the US Institute of Medicine (IOM) convened a meeting of healthcare stakeholders to discuss challenges facing clinical research. At the meeting, stakeholders criticized the inadequacy of public and private investment in clinical research to...
Cost Effectiveness of Antiretrovirals - Long Term or Short Term?
HIV/AIDS is one of the greatest tragedies of the new millennium. No other disease has caused so much human suffering and has thrown back so many development efforts in such a short period. In particular, in sub-Saharan Africa, all attempts to roll back...
Cost Savings Associated with Filling a 3-Month Supply of Prescription Medicines
BackgroundPatients, providers and policy makers all face challenges posed by escalating healthcare costs in the US. Although prescription drug costs only represent approximately 10% of the nation's overall healthcare costs,[1,2] they are one of the fastest...
Demand for Outpatient Healthcare: Empirical Findings from Rural India
BackgroundUnderstanding the underlying process of the demand for healthcare is quintessential for a better assessment of the role of public intervention in the health sector. This issue has gained momentum recently, especially in developing countries....
The Cost Effectiveness of Home-Based Provision of Antiretroviral Therapy in Rural Uganda
BackgroundHighly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) offers benefits for HIV-infected patients in resource-poor countries that are similar to those reported for industrialized countries. These include reductions in viral load, increases in CD4 cells,...
Which Barriers Prevent the Efficient Use of Resources in Medical Device Sectors?
A medical device can be defined as any appliance to be used for human beings that does not achieve its principal intended action by pharmacological, immunological or metabolic means.[1] The range of medical devices is extensive, covering some 8000 types...
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