The Journal of Chickasaw History and Culture

Articles

Vol. 18, No. 1, 2016

A New Clue to the Age of Tisho Minko (and a Journalistic Howler)
Arecent communication from colleague Mitchell Caver, Tupelo branch director of the Mississippi Department of Transportation, has provided a link to a brief item titled "Interesting Operation." It was published in New York's National Advocate newspaper...
Read preview Overview
A Personal Reflection on the Development of A CONCISE CHICKASAW DICTIONARY
AN OLD, MUCH-LOVED DICTIONARYI write this from my home just outside of Ada, Oklahoma, in the heart of the Chickasaw Nation. It is well into early spring, with the grass turning a vibrant green and the oak leaves, the size of squirrel's ears, signaling...
Read preview Overview
A TALE of TWO CITIES: CHICKASAW INKANA FOUNDATION/HOMECOMING SERIES
Modern cities are defined by neighborhoods - sections of the overall community representing groupings of people in structures. These structures are sometimes a mix of residential, commercial, and even recreational, and they often reflect a certain period...
Read preview Overview
FLOYD SHIPMAN: An Oral History
On April 9, 2009, Janet Reubin conducted an interview with Floyd Shipman at his residence in Sulphur, Oklahoma. This is a portion of that interview. The full transcript and recordings are preserved in the Holisso: The Center for the Study of Chickasaw...
Read preview Overview
HUMES Memorial Fund
Vinnie May Seely James Humes* Inducted into the Chickasaw Hall of Fame in 1991* An original enrollee of the Chickasaw Nation* Knew only the Chickasaw language until age 8* Received her GED at age 70* Served as a special case worker for Chickasaw people...
Read preview Overview
Ittafama Ithana
The Chickasaw Historical Society hosted its first conference, Ittafama Ithana (learning meeting), January 13-14, 2016, at the Chickasaw Cultural Center in Sulphur, Oklahoma. The theme of the conference was "Building on the Foundation of our Tradition."The...
Read preview Overview
The Very, Very Beginning of the Journey: Part 1
(An Embellished Riff on the Chickasaw Migration Story as Told by the Clouds and the Sun)CASTHASHI, the Sun (A very happy sort who is terribly eager and relishes story telling. Think circus ringmaster!)RAIN Cloud/Wise Person/Tribe Member (Can be sassy)THUNDER...
Read preview Overview

Vol. 17, No. 2, 2015

Chickasaw War Names and Four Homeland Colberts
Thomas Nairne and James Adair, eighteenth-century chroniclers of Chickasaw society, and Malcolm McGee, the tribe's principal interpreter later in the same period, all spoke of personal naming customs used by the early Chickasaw Nation. In 1708, Nairne...
Read preview Overview
HUMES Memorial Fund
Vinnie May Seely James Humes* Inducted into the Chickasaw Hall of Fame in 1991* An original enrollee of the Chickasaw Nation* Knew only the Chickasaw language until age 8* Received her GED at age 70* Served as a special case worker for Chickasaw people...
Read preview Overview
The Chickasaw Battalion
Few records remain of the First Chickasaw Cavalry Battalion, which was in Confederate service throughout the American Civil War. Commonly referred to as the Chickasaw Battalion, the unit was organized early in the war, ultimately expanded to a regiment...
Read preview Overview
Two Tibbees
After two years of helping lead multi-day tours of important Chickasaw sites in the historical homeland where we are based, Tibbee Lake and Tibbee Creek in Clay County, Mississippi, have emerged as favorite spots. Sharing a name and close proximity,...
Read preview Overview
CHICKASAW in the Civil War and the BATTLE OF MIDDLE BOGGY
This year marks the 150th anniversary of the Civil War in Indian Territory. The Civil War was a long and bloody conflict that changed the course of our shared history; a war that divided states, tribes, men, and families. When many people think or talk...
Read preview Overview
JERRY IMOTICHEY: An Oral History: Part One
Jerry L. Imotichey, born May 24, 1938, in Fillmore, Oklahoma, is the third of seven children of Jonas and Josie Imotichey, husband to Janis, and father of four children. He has lived most of his life in the Fillmore area, where he served eight years...
Read preview Overview
Before Us, the Chickasaw: Their History Is Often Overlooked in the Homeland
This article and its contents were originally published by Daily Journal (a division of the Northeast Mississippi Daily Journal) in News at djournal.com on June 20, 2015 and is reprinted here by permission.Mark Twain said history doesn't repeat itself,...
Read preview Overview
IS THAT YOU, Momma?
Emma was eight when they took her mother to prison. She had heard the grown-ups say that before statehood it would have never happened. All she knew was that Momma was gone. Emma and her fourteen-year-old brother, Willie, were left alone, and they were...
Read preview Overview

Vol. 17, No. 1, 2015

Chikashahi' Chickasaw Horses, Plums, Roses, Lima Beans, And.Potatoes?
Over the years the label "Chickasaw" was used to distinguish various specimens of the natural world in the American Southeast. One of those was the renowned Chickasaw horse, a breed developed from repeated crosses of early Spanish mounts with saddle-...
Read preview Overview
HUMES Memorial Fund
Vinnie May Seely James Humes* Inducted into the Chickasaw Hall of Fame in 1991* An original enrollee of the Chickasaw Nation* Knew only the Chickasaw language until age 8* Received her GED at age 70* Served as a special case worker for Chickasaw people...
Read preview Overview
The Education of a DUGOUT MAKER
If a Chickasaw of our past in the homelands did not own a dugout canoe, he or she probably knew someone who did, or where to find one. So did most other people of their time. The slender, hefty watercraft, called "dugouts" because of the way they are...
Read preview Overview
Chisha' Tálla'a' and the Chickasaw Preserve
The Chickasaw Chisha' Tálla'a' Preserve is a place near Tupelo, Mississippi, where parts of our ancient ancestors' lives can be explored, interpreted, commemorated, and felt.In recent years Governor Anoatubby has led our tribal nation into a renaissance...
Read preview Overview
The Packhorseman
Reviewed by Brad R. LiebThe Packhorseman. Charles Hudson. The University of Alabama Press, Tuscaloosa, 2009. xiii + 266 pp., map, notes, selected references. $24.95 (paper), ISBN 978-0-8173-5540-1The Packhorseman is a historical novel portraying a year...
Read preview Overview
Editor's Letter
ChokmaIt has been one year since we introduced the Ofi' Tohbi' Literary Revieiv and two years since White Dog Press was launched. The time has gone by in a hurry and the progress has been great. The response and need for creative works of fiction that...
Read preview Overview
Why June Bug Flies So Badly
y^haloklowa ' Imissap (June Bug) has always been a pest.He would start thinking about someone and his mind would fill up with questions he wanted to ask them. So, that's what he would do.One morning he woke up thinking about Yanash (Buffalo), so off...
Read preview Overview
How Shokkaawi' Got His Fire
One day the Sun didn't rise.All of the animals, birds, and insects waited, but he never started his usual trip across the sky.So they held a council.Nita' (Bear) spoke first, and said, "We need to find out why the Sun hasn't risen. Who will go to him...
Read preview Overview
The TRIUMPH and TRAGEDY of a REMARKABLE LIFE
Nelson Chigley was a unique and outstanding individual, given the time period in which he lived and his humble beginnings. He was a full-blood Chickasaw born to Chigley (or Chigler in some sources) and Eu-pulkee in our homelands around Memphis, Tennessee,...
Read preview Overview
Nanushichi the Evil-Doer
The orange sky made a haze out to the west over the Arbuckles. It was no ordinary day over the canyon. Dave Wallace had taken his horse, Skippin, into the valley just below Turner Falls. He was a quarter mile west of his ranch house when he started looking...
Read preview Overview

October 2014

Chokma!
For centuries the Chickasaws have participated in what we now call the oral tradition. We have passed down our history and our stories verbally, not in writing. It has only been within the last few decades that we have begun to record our past in print,...
Read preview Overview
Why the Dances Stopped
Recently, while reading an old issue of The Journal of Chickasaw History and Culture, I came across the oral history of Pauline Carpenter Brown. In the article, she talks about her mother and aunts going to stomp dances. She also states, "Sometime in...
Read preview Overview
THE LIVES OF CHILDREN DURING THE American Revolution THROUGH THE EYES OF A CHICKASAW GIRL
Chokma! Saholhchifoat Hilhla'.Hello! My name is Dancer.I am eleven years old. I am named Hilhla' because I love to dance at the stomp dance in my village. My village is a Chickasaw village. We live near water in the southeast. The water is very important...
Read preview Overview
Chickasaw Inkana Foundation
Earlier this year, a group of Mississippi residents, in cooperation with the Chickasaw Nation, established a non-profit foundation, the Chickasaw Inkana Foundation, to assist with educational and preservation efforts in the Chickasaw homeland.Fleadquartered...
Read preview Overview
HUMES Memorial Fund
Vinnie May "Sadie" Humes was born in Coatsworth, Indian Territory in 1903, and was an original enrolled member of the Chickasaw tribe.Although Mrs. Humes was 70 years old before receiving her high school equivalent degree (GED) through courses offered...
Read preview Overview
Chokma
Fall is a busy time for all, with school starting, weather changing, holidays approaching, and pressing deadlines. The constant, blinding pace can begin to wear one down and dampen spirits. Life gets in the way in a hurry if you are not careful, and...
Read preview Overview
Chikashshanompa' Ilanompola'chi
December 30, 2013, marked a monumental loss for the Chickasaw Nation as it mourned the passing of its last monolingual speaker. Born in the 1920s, this valued elder surely witnessed unprecedented and relentless change within her community as mainstream...
Read preview Overview
ANCIENT Owl Beliefs
Owls are generally viewed among most American Indian tribes as mystical spirits of wisdom and protectors of the underworld. They also have a reputation as animals to be feared, either because they are thought of as messengers of death or as the presences...
Read preview Overview
The THOMAS FAMILY
Many of our Chickasaw ancestors told their children stories about their families, where they came from, what they did, and the importance of passing the stories along. One family was determined to tell their children their history, and here is how their...
Read preview Overview
Hog and Buzzard
In his book History of the Choctaw, Chickasaw and Natchez Indians, Horatio B. Cushman sometimes seems to imply that Choctaws and Chickasaws and other Southeastern Native Americans were perfect.1 You have to admire a European-American with good sense...
Read preview Overview
Story of Wild Cat Clan
John Swanton, an American anthropologist and linguist who worked with Native Americans in the United States, collaborated with Amos Hayes, George Wilson, and Zeno McCurtain to collect, record, and transcribe fourteen stories about Chickasaw clans from...
Read preview Overview
SERENA'S Story
It is a fairly warm day for May, and I do declare it is going to be a long, hot summer.I sit in my rocking chair with my window open, so I can feel that good south breeze.I turned ninety-three in February. I'm a full-blood Chickasaw woman, and I've seen...
Read preview Overview
Tyra Shackleford
hile twelve years old, Tyra Shackleford created her first fingerwoven belt and entered the world of textile art."My dad (Randy Shackleford) was taking us to stomp dances, and we were with the dance troupe," she explains. "I wanted to make a belt to match...
Read preview Overview

Vol. 15, No. 4, Fall

MURDERS at OAKMAN
Recently, while driving down the road heading north of Homer, Oklahoma, just before I reached the intersecting roads where the Oakman sign reads: "Population 28," I couldn't help but think about the murderous events that happened there so long ago. Who...
Read preview Overview
Little People & Leprechauns: Creatures of Cultural Folklore
Little people have been a part of the folklore of many cultures in human history, including the Irish, the German, the Scottish, and Native Americans. While these cultures reside on different continents, a common thread they possess is that of dwarf-like...
Read preview Overview

Vol. 14, No. 3, Spring

The Green Corn Ceremony of the Southeastern Indians
Corn was the single most important food for the In- dian nations of the Southeastern United States includ- ing but not limited to the Cherokee, Creek, Choctaw, Chickasaw, and Seminole. Since corn was such a vi- tal part of their food chain, it also played...
Read preview Overview
Ancient Chickasaws Wore Cloth
We have all seen the Hollywood movies of Native Americans wearing the same style of native clothing. The women wearing a dress made of deer skin with long fringe swaying with the movement of the wearer, and the men wearing leather leggings and a shirt...
Read preview Overview

Vol. 13, No. 2, Fall

Research like a Detective
Everyone has heard family stories at one time or another. Some stories may be about family struggles, marriages, or births. Though documents may be hard to find at times because they were lost or destroyed, most family stories can be easily traced and...
Read preview Overview
Government Schooling and Its Effects on Indigenous Cultures: Gender and Environment
Indigenous communities have always had some form of education that helped perpetuate their culture. For the indigenous people living in Sudan, Canada, and the United States, their education was encompassed in their traditions and values, which in turn,...
Read preview Overview

Vol. 12, No. 4, Fall

The Chickasaw People and Ways They Used Their Land
Editor's note: The following article was honored in 2010 by the Chickasaw Nation Division of History and Culture as best unpublished article dealing with Chickasaw history or culture.Before the time of removal, Native Americans thrived in every region...
Read preview Overview
The Outlaw Statesman: The Life and Times of Fred Tecumseh Waite
The Outlaw Statesman: The Life and Times of Fred Tecumseh Waite. By Mike Tower. (Bloomington, Indiana: Authorhouse, 2007. 237 pp. map, notes, bibliography, index. Paperback $14.49.)When researching about various Chickasaw statesmen, I kept encountering...
Read preview Overview
Remaining Chickasaw in Indian Territory, 1830s-1907
Remaining Chickasaw in Indian Territory, 1830s-1907. (Tuscaloosa: The University of Alabama Press, 2011. ix+156 pp. notes, bibliography, index. $15.00. pbk.) by Wendy St. Jean.Sustaining tribal sovereignty and cultural identity were among the greatest...
Read preview Overview

Vol. 12, No. 2, Spring

A Note from Bill Anoatubby
It might be hard to believe, but when the Chickasaw Cultural Center (CCQ opens this summer, it will be the culmination of a 20-year vision. From the very first whispers of a cultural center decades ago, this vision has grown through Chickasaw communities...
Read preview Overview
Nannamat Lihochifochitok: CHICKASAW PLACE NAMES AT THE CHICKASAW CULTURAL CENTER
The Chickasaw Cultural Center (CCC), located in Sulphur, Oklahoma, was designed from the outset to reflect the heart and soul of hattak alhihd Chikasha, the Chickasaw people. The CCC is a place for all Chickasaw people to return home to, and to see something...
Read preview Overview
Remembering Our Past, Building Our Future: The Chickasaw Cultural Center Time Capsule
Fifty years from now, items donated to a time capsule commemorating the opening of the Chickasaw Culture Center will be opened and its contents revealed to Chickasaws of the future. The event will initiate at the Chikasha Poya Exhibit Center, which will...
Read preview Overview
Come to the Museum, Go to the Movies: The Anoli' Theater
Along with the traditional village, spirit forest, and other interactive celebrations of Chickasaw culture and experience, the Cultural Center is home to the Anoli' Theater, designed specifically to showcase Chickasaw movies and movies about subjects...
Read preview Overview
Aaimpa' Café
The Chickasaw Aaimpa' Café, Aaimpa meaning "place to eat" will be located in the Anoli' Theater building on the Chickasaw Cultural Center campus in Sulphur, Oklahoma. Like all other buildings on campus, the café features a strong influence of southeastern...
Read preview Overview
The Use of Iconography at the Chickasaw Cultural Center
The Mississippian culture dominated the southeastern United States from 800 AD-1 500 AD, and its significance is still revered today at the locations of Cahokia, Moundville, Spiro, and other ancient mound building sites located in Mississippi. The designs,...
Read preview Overview
Chikasha Rising: The Chickasaw Cultural Center's Chikasha Inchokka' ("Chickasaw House") Traditional Village and the Renaissance of a People
A clear autumn sky enveloped the village below. Amid the bustling of people enjoying the day's activities, a reverent peacefulness surrounded the village. As the fall breeze gently stirred the air, a group of men sat around a fire cooking pishofa (a...
Read preview Overview
The Chickasaw Leaning Pole: Finding Our Home
An Interview with Chickasaw Artisans Wayne Walker and Wayne ScribnerWhen speaking of homes, Chickasaws often talk about many different kinds of homes. They speak about their ancestral family allotments in Oklahoma where grandparents might live, about...
Read preview Overview
Hapoyimmi-We All Believe
The opening of the Chickasaw Cultural Center has been a much anticipated event, guaranteed to evoke a number of emotions in each and every one of us. Over the past few months, citizens, employees, and members of the community were asked, "What does the...
Read preview Overview
Preservation through Education
The rock building on Broadway Ave. in Ada, Oklahoma, stands serene with only a slight swoosh of passing vehicles carrying their occupants to some destination. The sun is radiant. It's the sort of sunshine that forces a person to squint as they exit their...
Read preview Overview

Vol. 12, No. 1, Fall

Editor's Introduction
In this issue of The Journal of Chickasaw History and Culture, readers will discover two articles of different historical perspectives, and from different times and places. Both articles, however, speak to the breadth and distance in time of Chickasaw...
Read preview Overview
A Chickasaw Shipmate: The Bill Kennedy Story, or Life aboard the USS Wedderburn (DD-684)
William "Billy Dan" Kennedy, was the first son born to William Douglas Kennedy, an original Chickasaw enrollee, and EuIa (Morrison) Kennedy, a non-enrolled Choctaw. Bill was born on July 17, 1925, near Ada, Oklahoma, on his mother and father's allotment...
Read preview Overview
Chickasaw/Wichita Interactions during the Early Historic Period
Few scholars, lay historians, or Chickasaw tribal members today for that matter, know that the Chickasaw and Wichita Nations possess a long history of friendship and peaceful interaction. The focus of this article is to explore the connections fostered...
Read preview Overview
Winnie McNeely Oral History
This is Janet Reubin and I am doing an oral history on Winnie McNeely. It is April the 14th of 2009 and we're in the Community Center in Ardmore, Oklahoma. Let's begin."Okay, my name is Winnie McNeely. I was born on April 9th, 1933. Fm full-blood Chickasaw....
Read preview Overview
The Wild Onion Day
The sun was shining bright into Lindsey's room.It reminded her that today was a special day.Today was Wild Onion Day.Lindsey knew she would be sharing the day with one of her favorite people.Grandma Dorothy.Grandma Dorothy was an elder with the Chickasaw...
Read preview Overview

Vol. 11, No. 4, Spring

Editor's Note
In this issue of The Journal of Chickasaw History and Culture, readers will discover the strength and importance of memory Each article and poem that follows are celebrations as well as discoveries, for individuals and collectively as Chickasaws, that...
Read preview Overview
Chickasaw Veterans of World War II
The American experience in World War II draws the interest of many, likely because great nostalgia and national identity is attached to the war. Often labeled "The Good War," World War II was, most Americans believed, a necessary fight. The war certainly...
Read preview Overview
The Alfred Victor Story: A Choctaw-Chickasaw Family History
Near the end of the French Revolution, as social turmoil in the nation deepened and threats upon the lives of those in certain quarters of French society loomed, one family with the surname of Victor decided to send three young brothers to a safer haven...
Read preview Overview
Uncle Allen's Journey
IWilliam Allen Morgan was born in 1901in the Chickasaw Nation, Indian TerritoryHis brother Raymond, my dad, was born in 1903.Dad joined the army and Uncle Allen the navyin 1942, not long after Pearl Harbor,at 39 and 41 years of age.Uncle Allen had never...
Read preview Overview
Looting Spiro Mounds: An American King Tuts Tomb
Looting Spiro Mounds: An American King Tuts TombBy David L. Vere Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 2007. 255 pp. $24.95, paper.Scholars of pre-European contact Native American societies very oftenacknowledge those of the Mississippian period (ca....
Read preview Overview

Vol. 11, No. 3, Fall

Editor's Note
Following the Civil War and the era of Reconstruction, tribes in Indian Territory faced another round of invasion and colonization. Reconstruction treaties forced the door open to allow a technological foray that would bring corporate invasions, economic...
Read preview Overview
The Chickasaw View of the Railroad: Accommodation, Resistance, and the Demise of Sovereignty
The introduction of the railroad in Indian Territory brought enormous changes for the Chickasaw Nation. As individuals, and as a nation collectively, Chickasaws responded to the changes wrought by railway incursion both through processes of accommodation...
Read preview Overview
Benjamin H. Colbert: Legacy of a Chickasaw Rough Rider
Native Americans have often been identified as fierce warriors by numerous observers from both within and outside of tribal societies. Many reasons have been given to explain this characteristic, especially when focusing on modern times. Some fight for...
Read preview Overview
Piomingo Day
In 1492"In fourteen hundred ninety-two, Columbus sailed the ocean blue. He had three ships and left from Spain; He sailed through sunshine, wind, and rain."In 1492, an Italian sailor named Christopher Columbus, funded by Queen Isabella of Spain, sailed...
Read preview Overview
Chikashsha Imithaná (Chickasaw Knowledge)
Spotlight on Chickasaw Language, History, and Culture from the department of Chickasaw StudiesNaní kalló hilhá: The Chickasaw Hard Fish DanceChickasaw people have been singing and dancing from a time beyond memory From our ancient Mississippian forbears,...
Read preview Overview
Making Indian Law: The Hualapai Land Case and the Birth of Ethnohistory
Making Indian Law: The Hualapai Land Case and the Birth of Ethnohistory by Christian W McMillen New Haven: Yale University Press, 2007. 284 pages. ISBN 978-0-300-11460-7.In Making Indian Law, Christian W McMillen analyzes one of the most important cases...
Read preview Overview
Violence over the Land: Indians and Empires in the Early American West
Violence over the Land: Indians and Empires in the Early American West by Ned Blackhawk Cambridge, MA: Harvard Univ. Press, 2006. 384 pages. ISBN 978-0-674-02290-4.In Violence over the Land: Indians and Empires in the Early American West, Ned Blackhawk...
Read preview Overview

Vol. 11, No. 2, Spring

Editor's Note
National treasures are hard to come by. For a society or nation like the Chickasaw to have not just one, but two, is remarkable indeed. The sixty-year career of Te Ata, the American Indian folklorist, is well known due in part to Richard Green's biography...
Read preview Overview
From His Personal Journal during the Spanish American War
IntroductionIn 1898, Colonel Theodore Roosevelt as Assistant Secretary of the Navy visited Indian Territory to recruit troops for the First Territorial Volunteer Cavalry. A Chickasaw Indian by the name of Benjamin H. Colbert eagerly answered the call...
Read preview Overview
"As Tall in Her Moccasins as These Sequoias Will Grow on Mother Earth:" the Life of Ataloa
IntroductionOn March 27, 1896 in Indian Territory, near where today the town of Duncan, Oklahoma, is located, Mary Stone was born. Mary Stone became more famously known as Ataloa.1 According to church records from the early-twentieth century, Ataloa...
Read preview Overview
Clayburn Straughn-Master Artist
Clayburn Straughn was born in 1923 and grew up during the Great Depression of the 1930s. Clayburn's mother, Frances Carlton Straughn, was an original Chickasaw enrollee and his great-grandfather came from the Old Chickasaw Nation during the Great Removal...
Read preview Overview
Chi Ka Sha Althliha Ha Pomi Ittafaamitok: "Our Chickasaw People Have Always Gathered Together:" Robert Kingsbery's Annual Meeting Photographs 1964-1966
Chickasaw Robert Kingsbery, Jr. was an active participant in the political life of the Chickasaw Nation during the crucial years from the late 1950s into the late 1960s. As an active supporter of Overton James and a member of James' advisory council,...
Read preview Overview
"Journey of the Dart Point"
Approximately 7,000 years ago, in an area of North America bordering what is now known as the Llano Estacado, an ancient Paleo-Indian was intensely at work, putting the finishing touches on another hunting dart point. In his short lifetime, he had shaped...
Read preview Overview
Boarding School Blues: Revisiting American Indian Educational Experiences
Boarding School Blues: Revisiting American Indian Educational Experiences by Clifford E. Trafzer, Jean A. Keller, and Lorene Sisquoc Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2006. 256 pages. $45.00 cloth; $20.00 paperReview ByS. Matthew DeSpain, University...
Read preview Overview
Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.