Monthly Review

Monthly Review is a magazine specializing in Educational topics.

Articles from Vol. 67, No. 10, March

Beyond Pedagogies of Repression
IntroductionAt a time when the public good is under attack and there seems to be a growing apathy toward the social contract or any other civic-minded investment in public values and the larger common good, education has to be seen as more than a credential...
Notes from the Editors
Ellen Meiksins Wood, who died on January 14, was coeditor of Monthly Review with Harry Magdoff and Paul M. Sweezy from 1997 to 2000, and a major contributor to historical materialist thought in the late twentieth and early twenty-first century. Her parents...
Opting out of the Education Reform Industry
We believe the opportunity to build numerous multi-billion dollar education enterprises is finally real. The biggest investment opportunity is where there is a problem-the bigger the problem, the bigger the opportunity. There is no bigger problem in...
Should New York City Teachers Support Opt Out?: Two Views in the UFT
New York State's Opt Out movement was described by the New York Times as "the vanguard of an antitesting fervor that has spread across the country."1 The movement consists primarily of parents and students who fought against high-stakes Common Core State...
Testing and Social Studies in Capitalist Schooling
In a New York Times editorial on August 15, 2015, the editors, following the NAACP, cautioned that the movement for students to opt out of highstakes standardized exams was detrimental to minority students and their communities.1 The rigorous accountability...
The Opt out Revolt: Democracy and Education
In the United States today, the age of monopoly-finance capital and neoliberal politics, all aspects of social life are being financialized at breakneck speed, while the economy as a whole and employment remain lackluster. Financial flows of whatever...
The Testing Resistance and Reform Movement
In the spring of 2015, more than 620,000 students refused to take state standardized exams. The numbers were stunning in some places: 240,000 in New York; 110,000 in New Jersey; 100,000 in Colorado; 50,000 in Washington; 44,000 in Illinois; 20,000 in...
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