Monthly Review

Monthly Review is a magazine specializing in Educational topics.

Articles from Vol. 66, No. 9, February

Cooperatives on the Path to Socialism?
Clarifying what Karl Marx thought of the role of cooperatives is useful, not to receive the "correct" answer to what that role will be, but to help think through what alternatives answers might be and how they might color today's expectations of the...
Crossing the River of Fire: The Liberal Attack on Naomi Klein and This Changes Everything
The front cover of Naomi Klein's new book, This Changes Everything, is designed to look like a protest sign. It consists of the title alone in big block letters, with the emphasis on Changes. Both the author's name and the subtitle are absent. It is...
Native Land and African Bodies, the Source of U.S. Capitalism
Walter Johnson, River of Dark Dreams: Slavery and Empire in the Cotton Kingdom (Cambridge, MA: Belknap Press, 2013), 560 pages, $35.00, hardback.Had Marx written Capital in the early twenty-first century, knowing what he could not discern in 1867-that...
Neoliberal Co-Optation of Leading Co-Op Organizations, and a Socialist Counter-Politics of Cooperation
Many people think of cooperatives as small, locally owned businesses, such as groceries, cafes, or bicycle shops, where people can work in an equal and participatory non-capitalist organization. In reality, the U.S. co-op movement is tied to U.S. federal...
Notes from the Editors
John Cassidy, who writes on economics for the New Yorker, is in our view one of the most interesting and creative commentators on economic analysis and trends writing in the mainstream today. His perspective might be best characterized as institutionalist-realist,...
The Struggle for Scotland's Future
Chris Bambery, A People's History of Scotland (New York: Verso, 2013), 328 pages, $24.95, paperback.By pure chance, this reviewer was nearby and briefly across the Scottish border only days before the September 2014 vote on independence. MR readers will...
What Was Occupy?
Three years after the fact, the event called Occupy retains its strange strategic inconsistency. It is something we still do not know how to think about. Its faithful, although in no other way silent, have shown little desire to specify the truth of...
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