American Heritage

Articles from Vol. 51, No. 7, November

Boomtown
A sleepy Southwestern city that has exploded into a metropolis, Austin fights to retain the best of its past A FRIEND OF MINE WHO SETTLED IN AUSTIN ABOUT 30 YEARS ago tells me it was really a small town then. "I knew the whole place. Geographically...
Cat and Mouse
In October 1962 I was a sonarman on board the destroyer USS Waller, home-ported in Norfolk, Virginia. Our duty was antisubmarine warfare training in the Cape Hatteras area, which meant we were out two weeks and in two weeks. Suddenly all leaves and...
Chosin
Fifty years ago in the frozen mountains of Korea, The Marines endured a campaign as grueling And heroic as any in history THE DEEDS OF OUR HEROES ARE BASED, ALL TOO OFTEN, ON THE ARROGANCE OF HIGHER authority. The list is long: Xenophon's Ten Thousand,...
Correspondence
Before Slavery In the May/June issue, "The Most Underrated National Turning Point" is listed as 1619, "when some twenty Africans were brought to Jamestown by a Dutch trading vessel. What if the tobacco growers of Virginia had simply turned them...
Forgotten War
EVERY EDITOR I KNOW HAS BRISKLY ASTRINGENT advice on how to handle any article: "Cut it in half, and it'll be fine." But this advice is just that--advice, which of course means that it is only given to somebody else. It's always harder to jettison...
Holding the Baby
Calling it simply Physics spoke volumes. As a freshman on the campus of Iowa State University in 1983, I always enjoyed that squat brick building. The wooden floors in the foyer creaked as you entered, waking the sullen graduate students slumped over...
My Grandfather's War
How the discovery of a long-forgotten trunk inspired an artist to spend years recording the quiet remnants of a wrenching military career. MY GRANDFATHER SPOKE TO ME ABOUT HIS EXPERIENCES IN THE FIRST World War only once, and that was abruptly and...
Nevermore
Old-style politics and the death of Edgar Allan Poe THE WHOLE CAMPAIGN WAS A SHAM. IT PITTED A WELL-KNOWN WASHINGTON insider, an incumbent too smart for his own good, against a candidate from the Western boondocks who many thought was simply not...
Panama's Canal
The high-tech wonder of 1914--now out of American Hands--helps keep the high-tech world of 2000 moving AS LAST YEAR ENDED, THREE MILLENNIAL CONCERNS OBSESSED THE public--or at least the press. The first was the utterly anticlimactic concern over...
Presenting the Presidents
An Interview With Spencer Crew A major new installation at he Smithsonian Institution explores the nation's biggest and most important job ON NOVEMBER 15, JUST A WEEK after the first presidential election of the new millennium, the Smithsonian...
Redefining Renewal
A Massachusetts town found a way to turn urban destruction around NEWBURYPORT, MASSACHUSETTS, WHICH LIES AT THE MOUTH OF THE MERRIMACK RIVER 40 miles north of Boston, was the third-richest city in the state after the Revolution and today claims...
Taking America's Temperature
OVER THE PAST HALF-CENTURY, POLLING HAS REMADE THE ELECTORAL PROCESS. IS IT HELPING DO THE WORK OF DEMOCRACY MORE EFFECTIVELY--OR ERODING IT? A POLLTAKER'S LOT IS perhaps least enviable when his profession is dealt with by historians of presidential...
The Little Refugees
THESE CHEERFUL YOUNG LADIES POSING ON the lawn of an English manor house give no sign of the harrowing journey they have made. At right is Sylva Avramovici, whose daughter Deborah Oppenheimer writes, "For nine months before the outbreak of World War...
The Stars When They Shone
IN 1946 THE NEW YORK PHOTOGRAPHER MURRAY GARRETT WENT TO HOLLYWOOD to open up the West Coast office of a photographic agency, and a few years later he struck off on his own. For more than a quarter-century, he recorded the doings of the movie world...
The Time Machine
November 1950 Fifty Years Ago Sweet Are the Uses of Adversity In a November 11 news item title SUGAR HANDY AID FOR A-BOMB VICTIMS, Science News Letter reported that America's resourceful sugar industry had found a promising new atomic age...
Till Divorce Do Us Part
It has been with us since Plymouth Colony. But that's not why it's an American institution. ON A SEPTEMBER EVENING IN 1918, WHILE UNPACKING AN overseas bag for her husband, who had returned from a fact-finding tour of war-torn Europe with double...
Why America Has No Concorde
A couple of big mistakes in developing our own SST turned out to save us from commercial disaster THANKS TO THE INEXORABLE WORKINGS OF PLATE TECTONICS, THE Atlantic Ocean is about 100 feet wider today than it was when Columbus first made landfall...
With the President's Body
ON FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 1963, I WAS IN THE FIFTH MONTH of my cardiology fellowship at Bethesda Naval Hospital on the northern edge of the District of Columbia. As I stepped into the hallway at 1:45 P.M., I noticed a small group by the mailroom window...
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