American Heritage

Articles from Vol. 51, No. 3, May

All the World's a Stage in New York State
RECENTLY, THE RESTORATION OF SEVERAL OLD BROADWAY THEATERS in New York City's Times Square garnered considerable media attention. While the renewal of these noble institutions has definitely been a worthwhile venture, there are many theaters in New...
Back to the Future
Beyond the myth of ever-faster high-tech change and radical new breaks from the past "WE HAVE REACHED THE EPOCH OF THE NANOSECOND. THIS is the heyday of speed ... a culmination of millennia of evolution in human societies, technologies, and habits...
Charleston, South Carolina A Multidimensional Destination
With a grace that has weathered three centuries, Charleston, South Carolina, is a place of welcome to 3 million visitors every year. The city continues to top of favorite travel destinations for its hospitality, variety and value. This year, there...
Correspondence
Freedom Fighter or Murderer? I find your cover story in the February/March 2000 issue offensive in both title and content. Calling John Brown the Father of American Terrorism not only is untrue but masks the real fathers of terrorism in the United...
D-Day
What began as a simple World War II code name more than 50 years ago has become known the world over as the consummate symbol for victory over tyranny. Except for its name, little else about D-Day is simple. For those crafting the plot to liberate...
How to Remember the Forgotten War
The Korean conflict erupted fifty years ago this June. Many Americans still believe that it began in debacle (which is true) and ended in a humiliating compromise that changed nothing (which is not). ONLY BY COINCIDENCE does the fragment of a map...
Overrated & Underrated
Are Moby-Dick, The Godfather, and Gen. Omar Bradley overpraised? Do Canada and Chicago and Ronald Reagan deserve more respect? Our third annual survey of the experts gives the answers. Aviatrix BY RICHARD REINHARDT Most Overrated Aviatrix:...
Prizing History
How TWO BUSINESSMEN have invested in the past by building the nation's most ambitious collection of historical documents and endowing the biggest award for historical writing' AN INTERVIEW WITH RICHARD GILDER AND LEWIS LEHRMAN RICHARD GILDER,...
The D-Day Museum
What do you need to build the only national museum dedicated to World War II? The same things we needed to fight the war it commemorates: faith, passion, perseverance--and a huge amount of money. IN 1964, AT FORMER PRESIDENT DWIGHT D. EISENHOWER'S...
The Man Who Won the War for Us
THE NEGLECTED EPIC OF ANDREW JACKSON HIGGINS UNTIL THE NATIONAL D-DAY MUSEUM GOT under way in New Orleans, the name of Andrew Jackson Higgins had largely faded in American memory. Long ago this master boatbuilder and industrialist had been dismissed...
The Night I Met the President
I REMEMBER THE DARKNESS THAT EVENING AT THE TRAIN STATION. THE CROWD, which I could see because of a few dim streetlights, was very large. I heard my grandfather use the word thousands. People in the crowd were talking quietly among themselves. The...
The Southeast a Place of Beauty and History
It is an interesting paradox that we Americans, citizens of such a comparatively young country and products of a culture preoccupied with progress, are so fascinated with our history. In the past year, 65.9 million American adults took a trip that...
The Spirit of Independence
It was a town where the trails started and the buck stopped. Home to a President and an outlaw, it made room for both. AS YOU DRIVE IN FROM KANSAS CITY, INDEPENDENCE doesn't look as if it has much to offer. The two-lane highway rolls away from the...
The TEMPER Thing
How bad is it when Presidents get really sore? THE RUMOR FIRST BEGAN TO SPREAD AROUND Washington last year: Sen. John McCain had a skeleton in his closet. Was it something to do with his past as a war hero in Vietnam? His voting record in the Senate?...
The Time Machine
May/June 1900 One Hundred Years Ago Carry Nation Took an Ax On May 31 the customers at Jasper Dobson's speakeasy in Kiowa, Kansas, were startled to see a determined, grim-faced middle-aged woman stride through the doors. She wore the sedate...
The Towering Boodoggle
When politicians make business decisions on a heroic scale, heroically scaled calamities often result BUSINESSPEOPLE, EVEN VERY SAVVY ONES, MAKE ECONOMIC MISTAKES. In 1899, Asa Candler, the owner of Coca-Cola, thought the soft drink's future lay...
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