American Heritage

Articles from Vol. 59, No. 2, Summer

Discovering Colorado's Louis L'Amour Country
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] WITH ALL 107 OF HIS BOOKS still in print. Louis L'Amour remains one of America's most popular writers. American Heritage is pleased to partner with L'Amour's publisher. Bantam Books. to offer readers a chance to win a trip...
Drawn to the Past
ANIMATION HAS COME tO historical documentaries. Perhaps inspired by the success of animated fictional films such as Waking Life (2001), nonfiction filmmakers are choosing to illustrate the past rather than rely on archival images or reenacted scenes....
Editor's Letter
WHEN ECONOMIC TIMES GET DIFFICULT, we feel the call to look back at our history more urgently than ever for context and inspiration. Several of the stories we bring you this issue address how Americans over the centuries have dealt with adversity...
Flashback to Woodstock
FORTY YEARS AGO A FEW rich kids hatched a nutty idea that became an event that rocked the nation, then morphed into a movement whose legacy lives on. This summer the young Museum at Bethel Woods in rural New York commemorates the anniversary of that...
Play Ball! in Baseball's Earliest Years, Players Beaned Baserunners and Often Had to Flout Town Laws Prohibiting the Game
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] THE GAME OF BASEBALL was not always the well-ordered sport we know today, played on elegantly manicured fields bordered by crisp white lines. As historians have debunked the widely held myth that Abner Doubleday of Cooperstown,...
Raising the Dead
THERE'S A NEW TWIST on the old party game of asking what questions a person might ask should they have the opportunity to dine with Abraham Lincoln or other historical figures. The "synthetic interview," a technology that comes from the computer labs...
Shipwrecked History: A Hurricane Sank a Fleet in Pensacola Bay 450 Years Ago, Dooming the First Major European Attempt to Colonize North America, a Story That Archaeologists Are Just Now Fleshing Out
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] ON AUGUST 15, 1559, the bay now known as Pensacola slowly filled with a curious fleet of 11 Spanish vessels, their decks crammed with an odd mix of colonists and holds filled to bursting with supplies and ceramic jars of olive...
Surprise Inscription Found on Lincoln Watch
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] ON SATURDAY, April 13, 1861, the day after Confederate artillery had fired upon the Federal garrison at Fort Sumter in South Carolina, President Abraham Lincoln sprang into action, calling up volunteer state armies and strategizing...
Surviving Bataan: After Living through America's Worst Defeat in World War II and the Infamous Death March, Army Priave Ben Steele Started Drawing Pictures of the Images That Haunted Him
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] HE IS 91 YEARS OLD NOW, among the handful of last men surviving from America's worst military defeat, the fall of the Bataan Peninsula in the Philippines during that desperate winter and early spring of 1942. Ben Steele,...
The Emancipation Question: A Lively Dialogue over the Economics of Slavery Played out in Newspapers and Magazines on the Eve of the Civil War
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] One hundred fifty years ago on a frigid and repulsive January day in New York, 30-year-old William G. Sewell departed on a steamer for Barbados, the first stop on a tour of the Caribbean island colonies of the British West...
The Wrong Man at the Wrong Time: For All His Previous Successes, President Herbert Hoover Proved Incapable of Arresting the Economic Free Fall of the Depression-Or Soothing the Fears of a Distressed Nation
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] ON MARCH 4, 1929, Herbert Hoover took the oath of office as the thirty-first president of the United States. America, its new leader told the rain-soaked crowd of 50,0000 around the Capitol and countless more listening to...
Wilderness Ordeal: Two Hundred and Fifty Years Ago, Major Robert Rogers and His Rangers Launched a Daring Wilderness Raid against an Enemy Village, but Paid a Steep Price
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] A DOZEN MILES NORTH of the British fort of Crown Point on the eastern shore of Lake Champlain, amid the buttonbush, bulrush, and cattail wetlands that crowded Otter Creek's delta, Maj. Robert Rogers glassed down the lake for...

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