American Heritage

Articles from Vol. 58, No. 4, Spring-Summer

America's Frontier Forever Changed: The West the Railroads Made
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] HALF A CENTURY AFTER ENGINES touched pilot to pilot at Promontory, Utah, to complete the first transcontinental railroad, the imprint of the Iron Road was nearly everywhere in the American West. Some enthusiastic real estate...
America's Top 25 Heritage Sites: Our Readers Vote for Their Favorite Historic Places
America is blessed with a richness of historical sites: From Franklin Roosevelt's Campobello home on the Canadian border and the Hemingway House in Key West to the little known WWII battlefield of Attu in Alaska's remote Aleutian islands and our country...
Battle for Ticonderoga: The Largest Army Ever Assembled in North America Attacked the French at New York's Fort Carillon ... with Disastrous Results
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] BY EARLY MORNING OF July 5, 1758, more than a thousand Albany-built bateaux, whaleboats, and three radeaux--cumbersome barges known as "floating castles"--crowded the calm waters of New York's Lake George in orderly columns....
Churchill Offers Toil and Tears to FDR: The World-Shaping Relationship between These Two Giants Got off to a Rocky Start
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] OFTEN IT IS SAID THAT VAST long-range economic and social forces, not the efforts of leading individuals alone, make history. The course of World War II denies this seemingly rational thesis. Hitler began World War II; he...
Did Alexander Graham Bell Steal the Telephone Patent?
IN HIS NEW BOOK, The Telephone Gambit: Chasing Alexander Graham Bell's Secret (Norton, 256 pages, $24.95), Seth Shulman states that the famous inventor "was plagued by a secret: he stole the key idea behind the invention of the telephone." In this...
Editor's Letter
On my desk sits a two-inch stack of letters and emails from hundreds of subscribers who wrote us with words of encouragement after we agreed to rescue American Heritage. On behalf of my staff, thank you all very much for your support, which is critical...
George Washington, Founding CEO: Sharp Business Skills Ensured the First President's Phenomenal Success
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] AMERICA'S GREATEST LEADER was its first--George Washington. He ran two start-ups, the army and the presidency, and chaired the most important committee meeting in U.S. history, the Constitutional Convention. His agribusiness...
Gettysburg Redux: A Brand New Visitors Center at Gettysburg Is Open for Business
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] VISITORS DON'T GET A GOOD LOOK at the new facility at Pennsylvania's Gettysburg National Military Park until they get close and even then they could mistake it for an exceptionally large farm complex. That's no accident. The...
Lincoln's Home Away from Home Reopens; the Washington, DC, Cottage Where the 16th President Escaped to Weigh Such Matters as the Emancipation Proclamation Has Been Faithfully Restored
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] ONLY THREE MILES FROM the White House, the house in northwest Washington, D.C., offered Abraham Lincoln a refuge from the capital's summertime heat and political pressures. The 16th president spent an estimated one-quarter...
Magna Carta Comes to America: The Founding Fathers' Belief in the "Law of the Land" Derived from a 13th-Century Document Recently Donated to the National Archives
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] "KING JOHN WAS NOT A GOOD man," wrote A. A. Milne in his children's classic, Now We Are Six. This feckless 13th-century king so badly mismanaged his kingdom that powerful English barons confronted him in June 1215 at Runnymede,...
The Evil Empire: On the 25th Anniversary of Two Famous Reagan Speeches, the Former Speaker of the House Asks Why We Haven't Learned More from the 40th President
A QUARTER CENTURY AGO, President Ronald Reagan delivered two masterful addresses within two weeks of one another: the so-called "Evil Empire" and "Star Wars" speeches. In them, Reagan laid out two great strategies for dismantling the Soviet Empire....
When Donkey and Elephant First Clashed
ONE HUNDRED FORTY YEARS ago, Harper's Weekly's cartoonist of genius, Thomas Nast, sired the Democratic donkey and Republican elephant into ridicule. In an environment of flourishing editorial cartoons, Nast's ready vocabulary of political symbols caught...
When the Reaper Came Calling
TO WRITE A GREAT BOOK choose a great theme, said Herman Melville, one of the sages, fools, and common folk who appear in this vivid panorama of tragic history. So let us now praise Drew Gilpin Faust for tackling such a theme in This Republic of Suffering:...
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