American Heritage

Articles from Vol. 48, No. 3, May-June

Cabot Drops By
* On June 24 John Cabot, a Genoaborn English mariner, became the first European since Viking days to set foot in North America, when he landed on what is now called Newfoundland. Or something like that. An event resembling the one in the preceding...
Deathless Words
* On June 2 Mark Twain, perhaps America's most original writer ever, gave American journalism one of its sturdiest cliches. Twain and his wife were in London, where they had quietly taken up residence following the death of their daughter Susy the...
Exploring the Great Smoky Mountains
Sweeping waves of craggy mountain crests bathed in magical mist. Slants of light in a deep forest clearing as pine needles snap underfoot. Streams that burble and beckon. A glorious burst of rhododendrons, accented by the untamed beauty of wildflowers....
Faces of Hospitality: The Florida Keys
In the Florida Keys nature seem more welcoming than elsewhere. The skies are bluer, the seas are calmer, the beaches are whiter, and the flowers are more fragrant. Perhaps that's why one finds so many friendly faces, so many people for whom the nicest...
Fields of Gold: More Than One Kind of Treasure Awaits Discovery in the Wilderness of the Yukon Territory
Last summer I flew from Whitehorse, in Canada's Yukon Territory, to Dawson City, center of the gold-rush Klondike. The plane was a bright yellow DC-3, the Lucky Lou, presumably named for a character in Robert W. Service's ballad "The Shooting of Dan...
GI Joe's Sex Life
* In the aftermath of World War II, Americans in many fields struggled to absorb the conflict's lessons. Tacticians analyzed its military successes and failures; scientists worked to apply technical advances; diplomats groped toward an understanding...
Inventing the Commercial: The Imperium of Modern Television Advertising Was Born in Desperate Improvisation
It was 1945, and everybody needed everything. If you knew how to build a car, a house, or a washing machine, you could sell it faster than you could make it. Car dealers, including fine old names that soon would be history--Hudson, Nash, Packard,...
My Life with the Lone Eagle: The Trouble with Having (and Being) a Hero
Charles A. Lindbergh, who vaulted to international fame seventy years ago this May by taking off alone one night and flying from New York to Paris in his single-engine monoplane, is buried in a small churchyard on the eastern end of the island of...
No Smoking or Jesuits
* In late May, New England's colonial legislatures passed laws to guard against a variety of menaces within and without. On May 25 the legislature of Connecticut addressed a pair of vices that had recently been causing much trouble: tobacco and alcohol....
On TV
I tend to resists television, history, especially when it's on television. The narrator always says, "The Golden Age of ...," and there's some grainy footage of a man dressed in women's clothes tripping over a coffee table amid gusts of scratchy hilarity....
Righteous Fists: The Boxer Rebellion Casts a Harsh and Vivid Light on America's Long, Complex Relationship with China
Let us look across the Pacific, where much of America's future lies, entangled as usual with its past. One of President Clinton's first post-re-election acts was a trip to Manila for an economic summit with Asian nations. There he trod another measure...
Sneaking Behind the Information Wall
The fog had finally cleared, and our departure from Russia had been set for July 8, 1974, our son's third birthday. We had three weeks to gather our meager possessions, exchange our rubles for dollars (maximum of $90.00 per person, which came to $360.00...
The First Season: 50 Years Ago Serious Pro Basketball Was Born. or at Least They Tried to Be Serious
To Horace Albert ("Bones") McKinny, listening over the phone in his parlor on Fourth Street in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, the words of Arthur Morse sounded just fine. Morse, who was part owner of the Chicago Stags franchise in the brand-new Basketball...
The 'Gaspee' Incident
* On June 9 the British revenue schooner Gaspee ran aground in Rhode Island's Narragansett Bay while chasing a suspected smuggler. Word quickly spread among the merchants, sailors, and smugglers of nearby Providence, who, like all Rhode Islanders,...
The Other John Gordon: The Author's Desk Connects Him with a Businessman Forebear, the Indian Wars, and Old Hickory
Among the infinitude of unintended consequences produced by the personal computer has been the explosion of interest in genealogy in the last fifteen years. The reason is simple enough. The personal computer is to genealogy what the microwave oven...

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