Mosaic (Winnipeg)

Mosaic, subtitled A Journal for the Interdisciplinary Study of Literature, is a scholarly journal that covers interdisciplinary studies and literary criticism. Founded in October of 1967, Mosaic prints this journal quarterly. Mosaic covers the topic of literature. The Editor is Dr. Dawne McCance.

Articles from Vol. 36, No. 2, June

Both Sides of the Massacre: Collective Memory and Narrative on Hispaniola
Julia Alvarez and Edwidge Danticat reveal how Dominicans and Haitians remember and commemorate the atrocities of Rafael Leonidas Trujillo's regime. While historical discourse is often inaccessible to marginalized communities, Alvarez and Danticat create...
Durrell's the Revolt of Aphrodite: Nietzschean Influences
Although The Revolt of Aphrodite is often considered an aberration in Lawrence Durrell's career, its scholarship insufficient compared to that of The Alexandria Quartet and The Avignon Quintet, the author argues that The Revolt makes significant contributions...
George Oppen's Silence and the Role of Uncertainty in Post-War American Avant-Garde Poetry
George Oppen's embrace of silence in his work, both in the way he writes and in his philosophy, shows the influence of post-classical science and mathematics, an influence that extends to avant-garde poets writing after World War II and that situates...
Introduction
This is how one pictures the angel of history. His face is turned toward the past. Where we perceive a chain of events, he sees one single catastrophe which keeps piling wreckage upon wreckage and hurls it in front of his feet. The angel would like...
Life Plus Ninety-Nine Years: W.S. Gilbert and the Fantasy of Justice
Gilbert and Sullivan's operas are satires about the law illustrating how judicial reasoning stretches into fantasy to fulfill a logical demand for a symbolic, redemptive accord between crime and punishment. The disjunction between justice and law provokes...
Niugini I Bekim Tok: Creolizing Global English in Papua New Guinean Literature
Papua New Guinean languages and literatures unsettle the English dominance that both proponents and opponents of global English claim. That world language takes new shapes in Oceania, as seen when John Kasaipwalova structures his fiction so that colloquial...
Patchwork, or the "Pile-Up of Possibles," in How to Make an American Quilt
Multiple, polymorphous, variegated, the paradigmatic motif of patchwork generates the weft and the weave of the meaning of Whitney Otto's kaleidoscopic text and sets it squarely in the quintessentially American domain of the 'pile-up of possibles"...
Spilling the Names of God: Robin Blaser's the Last Supper
The Last Supper, an opera with a libretto by Robin Blaser and score by Sir Harrison Birtwistle, offers a millennial review of Christian history and practice. This essay focusses on Blaser's libretto to explore the significance of his poetics of the...
The Artist in Word and Image in Gertrude Stein's Dix Portraits
The illustrated Dix portraits brings literary portraits by Gertrude Stein together with drawings of her subjects. Stein uses her portraits of artists to depict her own literary genius and acknowledges only Picasso as an artistic genius equal to herself;...
Under the Ribs of Death: Immigrant Narratives of Masculinity and Nationality
Given John Marlyn's emphasis an Canadian social history, it is important to consider his protagonist's relationships with all the male characters in Under the Ribs of Death; Marlyn's depiction of the male immigrant's masculinity and maturation is heavily...
Walking the Web in the Lost London of Mrs. Dalloway
In Mrs. Dalloway, landmarks of 1920s London offer readers a web of spatial and temporal relationships: the novel's walks are located specifically but also problematically. Attention to Woolf's careful interweaving of time and place leads to fuller...

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.