Mosaic (Winnipeg)

Mosaic, subtitled A Journal for the Interdisciplinary Study of Literature, is a scholarly journal that covers interdisciplinary studies and literary criticism. Founded in October of 1967, Mosaic prints this journal quarterly. Mosaic covers the topic of literature. The Editor is Dr. Dawne McCance.

Articles from Vol. 36, No. 4, December

Allegory, Maps, and Modernity: Cognitive Change from Bunyan to Forster
One of the most famous examples of a conceptual metaphor of the kind first analyzed in George Lakoff and Mark Johnson's Metaphors We Live By is Life Is a Journey. One of the most famous expressions of this conceptual metaphor is, in turn, John Bunyan's...
Crossings: An Interview with Erin Moure
DM I like the word pilgriming, wandering. In Peregrinations, Jean-Francois Lyotard says that writing (painting, thinking) is a kind of wandering between clouds. Does wandering or "pilgriming" relate to (your) poetics? EM Wandering I like. Pilgrimming,...
Cyberpunk Pilgrimages: Kathy Acker Inside/outside of the Sublime
There are numerous similarities in the testimonials of pilgrimage in both contemporary and traditional literature. The imperatives of travel and adventure characterize the spirit of pre-Christian pilgrimage, and in the Norse, pagan tradition these...
Ethnographic Pilgrimages in Depression-Era America
Many writers in the United States during the 1930s, feeling that fiction no longer adequately conveyed the devastating impact of the Depression, turned to what Edmund Wilson termed "straight reporting" (n.pag.); with great earnestness they aspired...
From Maps to Monuments: Elizabeth Bishop's Shoreline Poems
An emphasis on spatiality rather than temporality has been one of the main criteria used to differentiate the postmodern from the modern, both in architecture and literature. As Tim Woods states, "discussions of postmodernist architecture inevitably...
In the Eye of the Storm
TRANSLATED BY ANN KELLAND The origin of existence is movement. Immobility can have no part in it, for if existence were immobile, it would return to its source, which is the Void. That is why the voyaging never stops, in this world or the hereafter."...
Introduction
This is the modern-day pilgrim's deepest melancholy, Cees Nooteboom remarks in Roads to Santiago, that "the joy of return," in this case to Santiago de Compostela, is mixed with "the feeling that the places you have ached for since you first saw them...
Liminal Space of the Aboiteaux: Pilgrimage in Maillet's Pelagie
Antonine Maillet's novel, Pelagiela-Charette, which won the Prix Goncourt in 1979, is rife with tall tales, fantastic fables, and lessons of "History," all of which have come through an opening as small as a clapper in the aboiteaux: the mouth of a...
Modern Pilgrimage and the Authority of Space in Forster's A Room with a View and Woolf's the Voyage Out
In her essay "The arrow Bridge of Art," Virginia Woolf outlines a new theory of literature; she explicitly compares writing to a journey and defines it specifically as a kind of secular pilgrimage. She asks, "Could [the writer] not sometimes turn round,...
Pilgrimage as Opposition in Latin American Women's Literature
In the last decade, one of the most interesting and under-examined characteristics of Latin American novels authored by women is the recourse to representations of secular spiritual practices as a form of resistance to patriarchal authority. Authors...
Postcolonial Pilgrimage: Toward an Afro-Cuban Identity in the Poetry of Nancy Morejon
Arguably one of the most celebrated voices in post-revolutionary Cuban poetry is that of the 2002 recipient of the Cuban National Prize for Literature, Nancy Morejon. This internationally acclaimed poet and scholar is most noted for the richness of...
Salvation, Storytelling, and Pilgrimage in Tim O'Brien's the Things They Carried
Tim O'Brien's The Things They Carried participates in a tradition of literary revision unique to twentieth-century American war literature, joining e.e. cummings's World War I novel The Enormous Room and Kurt Vonnegut Jr.'s World War II novel Slaughterhouse-Five...
The Nostalgia of Nowhere: Pierre Loti's Utopian Spaces
For many contemporary readers, the name Pierre Loti is synonymous with stories of travel and pilgrimage, recounted in fin-de-siecle prose, in which the author describes with a sense of melancholy the adventures he has known, the lands and the loves...
Whose Turn Is It to Cook? Communitas and Pilgrimage Questioned
Margery Kempe, a fifteenth-century apprentice mystic and religious zealot, went on pilgrimage to Jerusalem about 1413. Along the way, she endured a difficult and dangerous journey and the extreme animosity of the pilgrimage group with whom she shared...
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