D.H. Lawrence Review

Articles from No. 34-35, January

D. H. Lawrence's Sons and Lovers and the Culture of Sacrifice
The "culture of sacrifice" of the title of this essay spans a wide range of literal and symbolic meanings, at least two of which have profound resonances for a reading of Sons and Lovers. While the practice of individual self-sacrifice is pervasive...
Hester and the Homo-Social Order: An Uncanny Search for Subjectivity in D. H. Lawrence's "The Rocking-Horse Winner"
On one level, "The Rocking-Horse Winner" focuses on the way a young boy becomes obsessed with gambling. On another level, however, Lawrence also centers on the way the young boy's neurosis directly results from his relationship with his mother. Indeed,...
The Philosophy of Life-Worship: D.H. Lawrence and Aldous Huxley
At the end of Those Barren Leaves (1925), Huxley's would-be mystic Calamy retires to a cottage in the Apuan Alps in order to investigate ultimate reality by dint of meditation, introspection, and celibacy. In Huxley's next novel, Point Counter Point...
Transcendental Climbing: Lawrence, Wordsworth, and Romantic Uplift
Because of its melding of natural piety with sexual energy, the oeuvre of D.H. Lawrence might be summed up as Wordsworth Eroticized. Admittedly, such a handily compact label would amount to a drastic oversimplification. To begin with, it elides the...
Using the Lens of Keirsian Temperament Theory to Explain Character and Conflict in D. H. Lawrence's "The Horse Dealer's Daughter"
Keirsian temperament theory is an elucidating critical lens through which to analyze character and explain the underlying motivations for a character's words and actions. The opening scene of "The Horse Dealer's Daughter," which depicts the Pervin...
Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.