Nexus: The International Henry Miller Journal

Articles

Vol. 11, Annual

Editors' Note
Henry Miller, waxing philosophical in "The Enormous Womb," writes, "Life, as it is called, is for most of us one long postponement." Three years after casting volume ten of Nexus into the world, one can readily understand the truth of those words,...
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Letters from June Corbett to Henry Miller 1965-1972, Part 1
The Beinecke Library at Yale University has acquired a number of letters to Henry Miller from June Corbett, his renowned second wife and subject of many of his books. (1) Though the first dated letter is 1965, they stretch beyond the 1972 date listed...
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What Are You Going to Do about Max?: Understanding Anti-Semitism in "Max"
The question of anti-Semitism in the novels of Henry Miller has long been a source of consternation to those who would champion his cause. The contradictory nature of the representation of Jews in his work has made it difficult to form a coherent defense,...
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"Holy the Lone Juggernaut!": Miller, Ginsberg, and the Autobiography of the Individual
These novels will give way, by and by, to diaries or autobiographies--captivating books, if only a man knew how to choose among what he calls his experiences that which is really his experience, and how to record truth truly. --Ralph Waldo Emerson...
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Humanism after Humanism: Henry Miller: Colossus upon Colossus
Then Gaudier rose. It was suddenly like a silence intervened during a distressing and ceaseless noise ... there, he seemed as if he stood amidst sunlight; as if indeed he floated in a ray of sunlight, like the dove in early Italian pictures. In a life...
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Big Sur and a Memorable Cup of Tea
"Paint as you like and die happy."--Henry Miller Living in the little town of Carmel-by-the-Sea during the 1980s, I frequently made the drive down the California coast through the legendary region called Big Sur. Most of the times that incomparable...
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Movement, Sensation, and Perception: The Wanderings of the Artist and the Emergence of Modern Urbanity
To the ordinary man. To a common hero, a ubiquitous character, walking in countless thousands on the streets. --Michel De Certeau Introduction The Modern City and the Modern Man. These two entities have drawn the intellectual efforts of...
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Meeting Miller ... First Encounters & Initial Impressions
Samuel Putnam, editor and translator He did, and it was Henry was more or less an unknown quantity for us when he arrived in Montparnasse. We knew he was a proofreader on the Paris edition of the Chicago Tribune, and that was about all. By reason...
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Daphne Moschos Gilliam Fraenkel and Michael Fraenkel
Soon after my marriage in the fall of 1947, my parents moved back to Indiana from Los Angeles; that is when they met Onya LaTour, a patroness/collector of the arts and an avenger of the modern movement throughout ultra-conservative Indiana. Onya...
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The Reverse of Don Quixote
Ontogeny : The history of the individual development of an organized being. As distinguished from Phylogenesis. Phylogenesis : Evolutionary pedigree or genealogical history. --Chambers Dictionary, 13th ed. Here's a Sunday newspaper from America....
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"One Measures a Circle, Beginning Anywhere": Henry Miller and the Fortean Fantasy
Toward the middle of Big Sur and the Oranges of Hieronymous Bosch, while complaining about all the mail he receives, Henry Miller says, "Perhaps I attract people who are given to experimentation. Perhaps I attract individuals who are struggling manfully...
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Henry Miller and Sacred World
The recent film, Henry and June, (November 1990) has attracted the attention of journalists because it introduced a new rating category, NC 17, a substitute for the older rating of "X." For me the film was important for other reasons; it re-introduced...
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A Hungry Eye: Henry Miller's Tropic of Cancer, Text, and Context
Hunger on all fronts In "Uterine Hunger," one of Miller's surrealist inspired essays from the 1930s, collected in The Wisdom of the Heart, he proclaims: "And always I am hungry, voraciously hungry. I am insatiable. It is a hunger on all fronts:...
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Miller Notes
Editors' note: This feature seeks to alert readers to current scholar-ship on Miller, as well as to significant popular references to Miller or his work. Reviews have not been included. If you would like us to acknowledge a new item (or an omitted...
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Vol. 10, Annual

Editor's Note
Ten years! When, in Ottawa in 2002, Roger Jackson and I first discussed the possibility of a journal dedicated to Henry Miller, neither of us expected the enterprise to continue through ten issues and dozens of articles. Looking back at the various...
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Wild Rabbit: The Reader, the Writer, & Ekphrastic Anxiety in Henry Miller's "Reflections on Writing"
"By daring one arrives at this mysterious X position of the artist, and it is this anchorage which no one can describe in words but yet subsists and exudes from every line that is written.'" Henry Miller, "Reflections on Writing" (3) "What should...
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Examining the Dump Heap: Prejudice in Henry Miller's Moloch
When Henry Miller's early works, Moloch and Crazy Cock, were posthumously published in the 1990s, the collective impression was less than enthusiastic. In the introduction to Moloch, biographer Mary Dearborn states outright: "its prose is spotty and...
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Open Letters from the Hotel Central: My Reply to Emil Schnellock and Henry Miller
When visitors come to my art studio, they gravitate to the back wall where a pair of wool trousers are suspended from a steel belt. Who is this man, cut in half, with Feragamo shoes? They peer into the pants, which are lined with Henry Miller's...
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Henry Miller: Creating the 'New Man' out of 'Chaos' Getting a Handle on Henry Miller
The narrator is finally over the misunderstanding that there's a savior who's going to miraculously change things to suit his needs. It's up to himself to adjust to the reality that life is not planned by God. He concludes one must do whatever they...
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Nostalgia without Chaos: Henry Miller and the Book of Friends
In her path-breaking book The Future of Nostalgia (2001), Svetlana Boym argues that "Nostalgia is not merely an expression of local longing, but a result of a new understanding of time and space that made the division into 'local' and 'universal' possible"...
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A Confession by the Ping-Pong Table
Saturday, October 4, 1969 There is a certain routine to our Saturday visits: talk, ping-pong, talk, drink, Henry excusing himself to take a nap before going out to dinner/party with Joe Gray. From now on, I will try to write down only what is...
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Anais Nin's Buried Child Translator's Afterword to the Japanese Version of the Winter of Artifice (the Paris Edition, 1939)
Anais Nin was born in France on February 21, 1903. Her father was a Spanish-Cuban pianist and composer; her mother--of French and Danish descent, and daughter of the consul of Denmark to Cuba (1)-grew up to be a classical singer. Anais Nin was born...
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The Five Henry Millers a Personal Essay on Approaching the Story of Henry Miller
Henry Miller was born on December 26, 1891, and he died on June 7, 1980. It has been over thirty years since his death and it seems that it's been even longer since the man's most major moments mattered. When I think about it, the odds are good that...
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Henry Miller: A Study
Of all the writers in the Western modernist canon, Henry Miller (1891-1980) will turn out to be one of singular importance and unusual power. Although his popularity is owed as much to the scourge of censorship as to his own talents, in his books he...
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Deleuze and Miller's Machines-A Reading of Desire in Tropic of Cancer
Desire makes its entry with the general collapse of the question "What does it mean?" --Deleuze and Guattari, Anti-Oedipus Much has been written about Henry Miller's use of the sexual and the obscene in Tropic of Cancer. As Phillip Mahoney writes,...
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French, Swedish, Japanese and Chinese Publications: A Photographic Listing
The publisher of this comic get well card with the Henry Miller theme was not determined nor the date it was released; however, the latter is believe to be the late 1960's or early 1970s. Opening the card the reader sees a two-word question: "Feeling...
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Articles Book Chapters
Blinder, Caroline. "Images of Paris in the Work of Brassai and Miller." Text and Image in Modern European Culture. Ed. Natasha Grigorian, Thomas Baldwin, and Margaret Rigaud-Drayton. West LaFayette: Purdue Up, 2012. 48-59. Blinder explores the relationship...
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Online Presence
Bluefarb, Sam. "Henry Miller and the Pull of Gravity." New English Review. Nov. 2010. <http://www.Newenglishreview.org]/Sam_Bluefarb/Henry_Millerand_The_Pull_of_Gravity/>. Bluefarb examines Miller's connections to the radical left and finds...
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Vol. 9, Annual

Editor's Note
Jeanette Winterson's review of Frederick Turner's recent book on Tropic of Cancer reignited discussion over Henry Miller s representation of women. Like Kate Millett, Sandra Gilbert, and Susan Gubar before her, Winterson reduces Miller's narrative...
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Tropic of Cancer: The Happy Nihilist
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] I remember very clearly how I read Tropic of Cancer for the first time, thirty years ago" very quickly, overexcited, in the course of just one night. A Spanish friend had got hold of a French version of this maudit book about...
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Henry Miller's Inhuman Philosophy
The question of Henry Miller's relation to philosophy does seem positively vexing. While he considered professional philosophy to be 'an activity removed from life," he still thought that "philosophy itself" was exciting, "not only as a legitimate...
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Henry Miller's Tropic of Cancer in the College Curriculum of One Happy Teacher
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] While reading Douglas Matus's "Teach as You Like and Die Happy: Henry Miller as High School Curriculum," in Nexus, Volume 7 (2010), I was struck by how closely his experience mirrored my own in over a decade's teaching at...
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Henry Miller and the Possibility of Wisdom Unfulfilled
(For Carol Ann) Henry Miller, "the king of smut," was afraid of a man he encountered only a few times--Aleister Crowley. The powerful, self-proclaimed Magus seemed to have a singular ascendancy over him. The Egyptian god of destruction, Seth comes...
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The Embodied American: The Cosomological Eye and the River Through
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] "Mallarme sounds like a sirloin steak, Victor Hugo like foie de veau" --Henry Miller, from Tropic of Cancer (1) "It is not possible [...] to extricate yourself from the questions in which your age is involved"--Ralph Waldo...
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Quiet Days in Clichy: Henry Miller's Urban Idyll
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Quiet Days in Clichy has remained one of the least examined of Henry Miller's works, with barely a mention in the Critical Essays or Nexus: The International Henry Miller Journal. This is no mystery; it is a difficult book...
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Time Tasted Nancy & Lawrence Durrell in Corfu
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] In early April 1938, Nancy and Larry boarded the train in Paris and headed south once more. Nancy was excited at the prospect of returning to Corfu and seeing the family again. The beginning of the year had been hard for both...
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Henry Miller's Black Spring through the Looking Glass of Jacques Lacan
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] The dreamers dream from the neck up, their bodies securely strapped to the electric chair. (Black Spring, 26) This is a self-portrait which yields only the missing parts. (Black Spring, 29) In Asleep and Awake, a 35-minute...
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"How Long Do You Intend to Stay?" Desire Meets Proscription in the Subject in Henry Miller's "Via Dieppe-Newhaven"
Those with only a passing appreciation of Henry Miller should still be able to recognize more than mere traces of desire that drip from the unfurling sentences and paragraphs of his work. For some, what I call desire may be interpreted as lust: no...
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To Paris, Via Montreal June 22-23, 1969
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Connie and I arrive Sunday afternoon at Henry's house, this time with suitcases. We have agreed to live in his house while he is in France for the summer. We will drive Henry to the airport tomorrow morning. He has accepted...
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Miller Notes
Editors' note: This feature seeks to alert readers to current scholarship on Miller, as well as to significant popular references to Miller or his work. Reviews have not been included. If you would like us to acknowledge a new item (or an omitted item...
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Vol. 8, Annual

Editors' Note
One of the pleasures of editing Nexus: The International Henry Miller Journal involves listening to new voices and learning what they have to say about Henry Miller. It's fascinating to recognize how much of an impact Miller, more than thirty years...
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Letter from Henry Miller to Alfred Perles
April 5, 193[6] Fred, In the last ten days or so I finished three solid sections of my book--Tailor Shop, Third or Fourth day of Spring, and City and City Man, (1) all of which I like tremendously and believe in utterly, through it moves me further...
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The Face of Richard Osborn
Among Henry Miller's friends, one of the least known is Richard Galen Osborn, a native of Bridgeport, Connecticut, where I teach English and creative writing. Though I had read Karl Orend's essay on the subject, "His Eyes Were the Color of the Sea"...
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Nothing but Light-Notes on Henry Miller's Birthday Gift for Anais Nin & the Tranquility of Struggle
Pour mes amis, Remy Deshayes, Susan Davey, Pierre Marsault & Doris Dietrich, et en souvenir de Dan Bloxam & Deucey Jones. "The great writer is the very symbol of life, the non-perfect." --Henry Miller On Tuesday February 21st 1939,...
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Miller and Seferis: A Mutual Portrait from One Mythologist to the Other
For Henry Miller, the journey to Greece in 1939, when he looked back on it, became the perfect conclusion to his Parisian adventure that started in 1930. What could seem a mere coincidence but later would appear to be of the greatest importance was...
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Love, Pain, Big Sur, and Life as a Bedbug
Saturday, May 30, 1970 When Connie and I arrive, we see there are many visitors: Joe Gray, Bob Snyder, Jacob Gimpel and his wife, Irene Sue and friend, and a beautiful young woman, Monica Peterson. She is an actress doing a short film on Henry for...
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Kilometre Zero: Paris Revisited, through the Palimpsest of George Whitman's Shakespeare & Company
(For Sylvia Whitman & Christopher Sawyer-Laucanno) Noel Young's Capra Press first issued Anais Nin's chapbook Paris Revisited in 1972, in both hardcover and paperback editions. Young had befriended Henry Miller when he was working in Big Sur,...
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"One Sits in the Middle of a River Called Nostalgia': The Henry Miller Research Collections at Southern Illinois University Carbondale
The Special Collections Research Center (SCRC) in Morris Library at Southern Illinois University Carbondale is home to a renowned collection of research resources related to 20th century American and British literature. With a strong focus on writers...
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Close Your Beautiful Eyes: The Denigration of Louis-Ferdinand Celine-A Prelude to His Evisceration & Inquiry into the Fate of His "Unfortunate Plagiarist," Henry Miller, "The American Celine."
(Part I) Karl Orend For Michael Neal (1) "It is always extremely easy to cover a man in shit when he is in no position to defend himself. In my day one was repulsed by this kind of behavior ... these days it can make one's name and reputation."...
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On an Old Book about Henry Miller
I have noticed recently, when I am in bookstores, that writers who are important to me are often only represented on the shelves by their "cote titles." For example, D.H. Lawrence's Sons and Lovers is often the only one of his books in stock when I...
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Miller Notes
Editors' note: This feature seeks to alert readers to current scholarship or Miller, as well as to significant popular references to Miller or his work Reviews have not been included. If you would like us to acknowledge a new item (or an omitted item...
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Vol. 7, Annual

Editors' Note
What a difference a year makes in terms of sales! After record sales for the 5th anniversary issue, we experienced huge drop in subscriptions for the 6th volume--despite positive reviews--no doubt because of the recession. Having lived through the...
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Four Letters from Henry Miller to George Orwell
[Summer 1936?] 18 Villa Seurat Paris (xiv) Dear Eric Blair: Have just waded through your book which was loaned to me by Bob Bjerre whom you probably know. I'm on the last few pages but write you at once to let you know that it was a great...
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Reveries of a Solitary Old Man and His Angels-Henry Miller's Unknown Book and His Encounter with the Magician, Joseph Delteil
For Jane Claire Henry Miller's engagement with the French language began early in his life. He first heard French spoken as a boy. Among his friends and acquaintances, there were those who knew the language well. He wrote of the refinement of his...
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Henry Miller and the Celebration of Loss
I moved along under the Equator, heard the hideous laughter of the green-jawed hyena, saw the jackal with silken tail and the dik-dik and the spotted leopard, all left behind in the Garden of Eden. And then her sorrow widened [...]. --Henry Miller,...
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Acceptance and Compassion in Henry Miller's Book of Friends
For critics and fans alike, the lure of Henry Miller's writing is often his challenge of accepted societal values, leading many to claim that Miller's program is the destruction of all values. Recent critical work has shown those assumptions to be...
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Henry Miller's Paris Guidebooks
The landmarks that populated Henry Miller's mental map o Paris following his first visit to the city could be summed up in one exuberant sentence: "Paris! Meaning the Cafe Select, the Dome, the Flea Market, the American Express. Paris!" (Tropic of...
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Teach as You like and Die Happy: Henry Miller as High School Curriculum
Henry Miller was a lifelong autodidact who loathed the American education system. As a high school student, he received A grades with almost no effort and harbored a thinly-veiled contempt for his teachers. His true education took place outside the...
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A Birthday Party for Henry
December 26, 1968 Connie and I are standing in Henry's home, in the ping-pong room, with Gerald and Diane Robitaille, and the other guests, awaiting the arrival of Henry and Hoki, for a surprise birthday party. Gerald, Henry's secretary, has invited...
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Crossing Brooklyn Bridge: An Ekphrastic Correspondence between Walt Whitman, Hart Crane and Henry Miller
The life of the highly influential, yet often poorly understood, American poet Hart Crane (1899-1933), who was a contemporary of Henry Miller's, was sadly cut short by suicide. Nevertheless, Miller revered Crane, which can be seen in the handful of...
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June's Arizona Grave
Originally Posted on Cosmodemonic Telegraph Company: A Henry Miller Blog, October 13, 2008. [ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] June Mansfield died on February 1, 1979. Or so it seems. Thanks to an anonymous tipster on my blog post about June, I was directed...
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Henry Miller: The Author as Artist
During the summer of 2005, art dealers Johan Helmersson and Peter Noren curated an exhibition of Miller's watercolors at their gallery Grodinge Antik och Design, located near Stockholm (1) The 21 watercolors they put on display were from those originally...
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June/Nadja: Symbolic Sisters in Arms?
If there is one work which stands out in the list of books which Henry Miller was familiar with, and which we also know made a vast impression on him during his lifetime, it must be Andre Breton's novel Nadja. With the subject matter herself at the...
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Finding the Feminine: Rethinking Henry Miller's Tropics Trilogy
"I have always loved the writers whom I call writers of extremity, those who take themselves to the extremes of experience, thought, life." --Helene Cixous Three Steps on the Ladder of Writing 34 In 2007, the Modern Library chose one of his books...
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Miller Notes
2008-2009 Newly Discovered Miller Texts (not in Jackson bibliography vol. I or Miller, Henry. "In an Alien Land." Harpers Aug. 1973: 10. Brief quotation from The Colossus of Maroussi that begins: "Away from home, especially in an utterly strange...
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