Mennonite Quarterly Review

The Mennonite Quarterly Review is a journal devoted to Anabaptist-Mennonite history, thought, life and affairs.

Articles from Vol. 73, No. 2, April

Anabaptist-Mennonite Spaces and Places of Worship
This special issue of The Mennonite Quarterly Review explores the Anabaptist perspective on the relationship of worship, broadly defined, to the physical place in which it occurs. Worship here includes gathering as a body of believers or as a well-organized...
Building the House of the Lord: Hutterian Architecture as an Expression of the Christian Faith
Abstract: Throughout their history the Hutterites have understood their Haushaben, or colonies, to be living temples of God. The whole of each community, as the body of Christ, thus manifested itself as the place where God dwells. As the "last" church,...
Door to the Spiritual: The Visual Arts in Anabaptist-Mennonite Worship
Abstract: The Anabaptist-Mennonite attitude toward the visual arts in worship settings has historically been iconoclastic. But since the middle of the twentieth century Mennonite artists have sensitized congregations toward an increasing embrace of...
Early Christian Meeting Places, Constantinian Basilicas and Anabaptist Restorationism
Abstract: The origin of Christian architecture has been much debated by early church historians. Many suppose the early Christian basilica follows the pattern of the suburban villa, while others believe it follows the pattern of the judicial basilica....
Form and Meaning in Central Kansas Mennonite Buildings for Worship
Abstract: A review of three "generations" of buildings for worship among Central Kansas Mennonites reveals variation, experimentation and borrowing of current American styles and motifs, despite a "classic" form built by immigrants. "Rituals of congregational...
Heinrich Johann Freyse's Renovation of the Krefeld Mennonite Church
Abstract: The renovation history of the Mennonite church building in Krefeld, originally constructed in 1693, provides a useful glimpse into the changing circumstances of the congregation that worshiped there. Local restrictions on Mennonites required...
Mennonite Debates about Church Architecture in Europe and America: Questions of History and Theology
Abstract: Mennonite church buildings (or meetinghouses) are traditionally simple and plain. One can find numerous examples of the Mennonite plain architectural style in many countries. Finding the explicit, written rationale for Mennonite architecture,...
"Only a House ... Yet It Becomes": Some Mennonite Traditions of Worship Space
Abstract: Two hymns widely sung among today's Mennonites succinctly evoke early Anabaptists' dual ideals of worship: the centrality and glory of being taught by the Word without traditional sacerdotal ambience. Two centuries after their withdrawal...
Places of Worship in the Russian Mennonite Commonwealth: Expressions of Conformity, Contradiction and Change
Abstract: Places of worship in the Russian Mennonite Commonwealth (1789-1914) reflected currents of conformity, contradiction and change. This article analyzes three overlapping periods of development. During the earliest phase (1790-1840), meetinghouses...
Restoring the Germantown Mennonite Meetinghouse: A Process
Abstract: The Germantown Mennonite Meetinghouse, built in 1770 in Philadelphia on the site of the first Mennonite church building in North America, represents a memorial to early Mennonite history and a potential source of education about this faith...
Today's Church Buildings in the Anabaptist-Mennonite Tradition
Abstract: In the beginning of the Anabaptist movement there was no church building because it was unlawful to practice the new faith in public spaces. Gradually one form of building--the meetinghouse--began to be associated with church life. Taking...
What Then Is the Anabaptist-Mennonite Architecture of Worship and Meeting? Concluding Reflections
Abstract: The concluding reflections review the wide-ranging presentations included in the conference on Anabaptist-Mennonite architecture of worship and meeting. Congregations in the Anabaptist tradition are reminded that they need not be entrapped...
"Wherever Christ Is among Us We Will Gather": Mennonite Worship Places in the Netherlands
Abstract: The history of Dutch Mennonite church architecture shows an almost total lack of formal consistency, and it reflects the development of the political and social acceptance of the Mennonites. When persecution ceased late in the sixteenth century,...
Worship and Churches in the Development of Mennonite Settlements in Paraguay and Brazil
Abstract: Most of the Mennonite communities currently in Paraguay and Brazil were settled by groups from the Russian Mennonite tradition. The first groups met for worship in the open air, then in make-shift shelters and then in schools. Only after...
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