Journal of Literary and Cultural Disability Studies

The journal focuses on cultural and especially literary representations of disability.

Articles from Vol. 3, No. 2, July

"A River That No One Can See": Body, Text, and Environment in the Poetry of Stephen Kuusisto
Drawing from extant critical analyses of the sites of language production and reception, and the relationship of body to language and metaphor, this essay examines the way in which Stephen Kuusisto's poetry questions held notions of language and embodiment....
Frances Browne, the "Blind Poetess": Toward a Poetics of Blind Writing
This essay analyses the nineteenth-century reception of Frances Browne's writing by both sighted and blind and visually impaired readers, exploring the competing ways in which the work was read bio-critically by the two groups. Sighted readers were concerned...
God, Money and Politics: English Attitudes to Blindness and Touch from the Enlightenment to Integration
Simon Hayhoe. God, Money and Politics: English Attitudes to Blindness and Touch from the Enlightenment to Integration. Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing, 2008. isbn 978-1-59311-913-3 pbk; 978-1-59311-914-0 hardcover 123pp + xi $39.99God, Money...
Introduction: Blindness and Literature
I have often contemplated teaching a Disability Studies class on literary depictions of blindness. It is safe to say that blindness has held a particular fascination in every culture since the beginning of time. Since sight is understood to be the predominant...
Lyric Anger and the Victrola in the Attic: An Interview with Stephen Kuusisto
I sat down with celebrated author Stephen Kuusisto in the fall of 2008 in Iowa City, Iowa where he lives. I had read his first book of poems, Only Bread, Only Light, and his two memoirs, the hugely popular Planet of the Blind and the recently released...
"No Place to Go, See": Blindness and World War II Demobilization Narratives1
This article examines the social, medical, and military contexts that shaped the cycle of World War II demobilization films released in the United States between 1946 and 1951. The focus is primarily on the ways in which loss of sight, experienced through...
On Blindness
Inept, inspired, pathetic, entombed, insatiable, or monstrous: the conventions that are ordinarily used to represent blind people reveal far more about our culture than they do about the experience of blindness. This speculative essay examines the place...
Refiguring Disability: Deviance, Blinding, and the Supernatural in Thomas Chestre's Sir Launfal
This essay examines Thomas Chestre's fourteenth-century Middle English Sir Launfal, which features the blinding of the adulterous Queen Gwenore by the fairy Tryamour, in view of the complex legal and social valences of blinding and blindness in the Middle...
Towards an Aesthetics of Blindness: An Interdisciplinary Response to Synge, Yeats, and Friel
David Feeney. Towards an Aesthetics of Blindness: An Interdisciplinary Response to Synge, Yeats, and Friel. New York: Peter Lang, 2007. isbn 978-0-8204- 8662-8 hbk 331pp £40.00In his essay on multiculturalism, "The Politics of Recognition," Charles Taylor...

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