Journal of Literary and Cultural Disability Studies

The journal focuses on cultural and especially literary representations of disability.

Articles from Vol. 2, No. 1, May

"A Big Deaf-Mute Moron": Eugenic Traces in Carson McCullers's the Heart Is a Lonely Hunter
The essay uses a historical approach to reassess previous literary criticism of Spiros Antonapoulos, the cognitively impaired character in Carson McCullers's novel The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter, in which a staged drama of loneliness unfolds against the...
Autistic Autobiography or Autistic Life Narrative?
The article offers an overview of autistic autobiography and suggests that, when studying disability life narratives, attention to the relations of production will help to assess the importance of traditional autobiographical texts in facilitating attitudinal...
Introduction: Thinking about Cognitive Impairment
The call for papers for this special issue was circulated under the title The Representation of Cognitive Impairment. Having come up with this fairly awkward combination of words, I was immediately struck-and continue to be struck-by the title's inadequacy....
On Autistic Presence
The article seeks to assert the centrality of an idea of autistic presence when considering the representations of the condition in the contemporary period. Focusing on the autistic rights advocate Amanda Baggs and the writer Donna Williams, it begins...
Sympathy as Cognitive Impairment in Robin Jenkins's the Cone-Gatherers: The Limits of Homo Sacer
The Scottish author Robin Jenkins's 1955 novel, The Cone Gatherers, is an allegory of the Nazis' persecution of the disabled that lends itself well to reading in terms of Giorgi Agamben's account of homo sacer. The gamekeeper, Duror, who persecutes the...
'The Country of My Disease': Genes and Genealogy in Alzheimer's Life-Writing
The essay explores the ways in which Alzheimer's life-writing negotiates contemporary biomedical discourses on the brain, brain disease, and selfhood, tracing the ways in which emergent genetic and neuro-scientific knowledge is organized and related...
The Unexceptional Schizophrenic: A Post-Postmodern Introduction
Postmodern theory has been indispensable to disability studies because it has challenged normativity and destabilized narratives of national progress, social order, and identity. The essay nevertheless contends that crucial texts of postmodern theory...
"What He Found Not Monsters, He Made So": The I-Word and the Bathos of Exclusion
Using the concept of bathos, the essay interrogates a late 2004 installment of Rall, a left-leaning cartoon strip that for political reasons reinscribes the alterity of people with learning disabilities. The trope Rall uses of ascribing mental defect...
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