Diálogos Latinoamericanos

The journal publishes work on Latin American cultural studies from historical or critical perspectives. It especially welcomes papers that offer comparative studies of nations, social classes, culture, race, gender, sexuality and identity in Latin America, and aims to bring together scholars working within the fields of History, Sociology, Anthropology and Literature.

Articles from No. 16, 2009

Chicano Identity and Discourses of Supplementarity on Mexican Cinema: From 'The Man without a Fatherland' (Contreras Torres, 1922) to 'Under the Same Moon' (Riggen, 2008)
A radical change took place in Mexican narratives of belonging during the 1990s, when NAFTA was first negotiated. Narratives of migration drastically changed the status of Mexican migrants to the US, formerly derided as 'pochos', presenting them as model...
Church, State, and Society during the Nicaraguan Revolution
The course of the Church's history in Nicaragua had changed from an institution led by a martyred Bishop protecting Indian rights before Rome and the Spanish King to one largely concerned with protecting its own interests following Nicaragua's independence...
Mexican Hometown Associations in the U.S.: Motives for Transnational Engagement
Most of the literature on Mexican hometown associations (HTAs) has focused on their role as development agents and often emphasized the rapprochement carried out by the Mexican state in order to attract remittances. Although the Mexican state plays an...
Negotiating Latina/o Ethnicity in NYC: Social Interactions and Ethnic Self-Presentation
Today, an increasing number of people regularly switch from ethnicity to ethnicity in normal discourse, in an attempt to maximize their economic and political interests. This paper focuses specifically on ethnic flexibility among Latina/os in New York...
New People, New Historical Narratives When the Mexican-Americans Came to Gonzales, Texas at the Turn of the 20th Century1
At the turn of the 20th century, the small central Texas town of Gonzales saw an impressive population increase consisting primarily of Anglo Americans from other parts of the United States and of Mexican Americans. The latter constituted a new ethnic...
Where Are 'We' in Transnational US Latino/a Studies?
The article considers various disciplinary, methodological, theoretical and ethical questions resulting from conducting transnational US Latino/a studies in practice. Drawing from research with a community of Latino prizefighters in Austin, Texas, it...
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