Base Ball

Articles from Vol. 6, No. 1, 2012

1919 Baseball Salaries and the Mythically Underpaid Chicago White Sox
For more than ninety years, it has been widely believed that the perfidy of the Black Sox was prompted by low player salaries paid by Chicago team owner Charles Comiskey. This article examines the soundness of that premise, popularized by Eliot Asinof,...
"Call the Game!": The 1917 Fenway Park Gamblers Riot
As long as there has been baseball, there has been gambling on baseball. In the middle of the nineteenth century, as the game began to spread in popularity among socalled "gentlemen"-members of the upper class playing for leisure-wagers were made for...
Editor's Note
In this special, single-topic issue, Base Ball explores the signal affair at the end point of its jurisdiction: the Black Sox scandal. Given treatments available elsewhere, our contributors do not revisit such familiar controversies as whether or not...
For the Record: The Movies, Eight Men out and Historical Accuracy
Narrative films are not factual films-even when they purport to divulge the true-life stories of real people. Whether their subjects are sports figures, show business personalities, or world leaders, such movies are often rife with misinformation. But...
The Bad News Bees: Salt Lake City and the 1919 Pacific Coast League Scandal
It was the best and the worst of seasons, 1920. On the upside, the Negro National League founded in February provide top-flight professional competition for those prevented by race from white Organized Baseball and Babe Ruth, in his first season as a...
The People of Illinois V. Edward V. Cicotte, et Al.: The Initial Grand Jury Proceedings in the Black Sox Case
Generally speaking, the judicial proceedings spawned by the corruption of the 1919 World Series are not accurately related or well understood in the Black Sox canon. In a forthcoming book to be published by McFarland, the writer will attempt to remedy...
They Were Black Sox Long before the 1919 World Series
(ProQuest: ... denotes formulae omitted.)Eight players on the 1919 Chicago White Sox have gone down in history for agreeing to lose the World Series to the Cincinnati Reds. The statistical and circumstantial evidence suggests that St. Louis gamblers...
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