Cross / Cultures

Articles from Vol. 187, 2016

1 Genre Memory: Australian Historical Novels in Context
In the Australian setting, tropes of romantic landscape in colonial art and colonial fiction have commonly offered identical significations. Colonial art has often provided writers with rich resources in relation to their imaginative critical reflections...
2 Intertextuality and the Postcolonial Novel of History
Recent Explorations of Intertextuality and Heteroglossia: The Influence of Benang and That Deadman DancePostcolonial novels of history rethink populist tropes of frontier adventure novels and their requisite genre conventions. Novels such as Oscar and...
3 Elision and Engagement: Writing Indigeneity in Post-Bicentennial Historical Novels
IN THE 1980S, NEW POLITICAL AND CULTURAL IDEAS of perceptions of Aboriginality and the postmodern novel start to ferment. These ideas would affect the ongoing development of historical novels in particular ways. Stephen Muecke critically identified shifts...
4 Postmodern Rats in the Ranks: The Novelist and the Historian as Raiders of the Colonial Archive
Some of us have lived through it, are living through it. It is not an exercise in historiography alone, and therefore presents problems beyond that of traditional historiography.1IN recent years, creating postcolonial literary fiction has become fraught...
5 Speaking in Tongues: The Novelist as Historiographic Fool
Historiographic Metafiction as Postmodern, Postcolonial InterventionMost historical novelists accept as a starting point a broadbrush pattern of general events that proceed teleologically as the passage of a protagonist hero/heroine is charted across...
6 Writing South of South: Extinction Discourse in Novelizations of Tasmanian Colonial Pasts
As though history and the written word were friends, rather than adversaries!-Richard Flanagan1Tasmania has recently produced and/or inspired a stockpile of white literary postcolonial novels, including realist, Gothic and mythopoetic treatments of cannibalism,...
Acknowledgements
Sections of some chapters appeared as earlier versions in the following journals and/or as part of conference proceedings. "Empathic Deterritorialisation: Re-Mapping Emotion in Writing and Researching Colonial Pasts" was presented at 'ASAL 2011 Field/Curriculum/Emotion,'...
Appendix 1: Postcolonial/Post-Colonial Debates in Context
IN THIS STUDY, I have used the unhyphenated term 'postcolonial' cautiously and with a sense of continually opening it out for critique. In this caution the novel's project aligns itself with Ella Shohats concern that the hyphenated term 'post-colonial'...
Appendix 2: Lessons in 'The Lost Garden': A First-Contact Tasmanian Historical Novel in Progress
HAVING WRITTEN ONE HISTORICAL NOVEL and learnt much from the trials and tribulations of that creative process, and having gained much inspiration and advice from novels of first contact such as Scott's That Deadman Dance, Grenville's The Lieutenant,...
Conclusion: Beyond the Dry Dock
The history and culture wars are symptoms of a particular Australian Zeitgeist. The playing-out of these debates around the historical novel has been particularly revealing. At the very least, the debates exposed how definitions of literature, history,...
Introduction: Making and Unmaking the Postcolonial Historical Novel
The great poet Novalis once said, "novels arise to draw attention to the shortcomings of history."1 Such a remark would likely be met with testiness in post-millennial Australia, where the telling and retelling of colonial pasts by novelists and historians...
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