International Ford Madox Ford Studies

Articles

Vol. 13, 2014

General Editor's Preface
Ford Madox Ford was a major presence in early twentieth-century literature, and he has remained a significant - if sometimes controversial - figure in the history of modem English and American literature for over a century. Throughout that time he has...
Read preview Overview
Introduction
Some Do Not . . . (1924), No More Parades (1925), A Man Could Stand Up - (1926), and Last Post (1928), known collectively as Parade's End, have long been recognised - alongside The Good Soldier (1915) - as Ford Madox Ford's finest achievements as a novelist....
Read preview Overview
'A Taboo on the Mention of Taboo': Taciturnity and Englishness in Parade's End and André Maurois' Les Silences Du Colonel Bramble
This chapter seeks to refine and extend our understanding of Ford's depiction of Englishness in Parade's End (1924-28) by juxtaposing that depiction with a roughly contemporary war novel by André Maurois. This procedure might seem to court bathos: by...
Read preview Overview
From Conversation to Humiliation: Parade's End and the Eighteenth Century
History and Parade's EndFrom the perspective of any close and interested reader of Ford's great tetralogy, one serious casualty of the 2012 BBC/HBO adaptation of Parade 's End - highly successful though it was - was its sense of history.1 History was...
Read preview Overview
'Are You Going to Mind the Noise?': Mapping the Soundscape of Parade's End
The first half of the twentieth century was known to its contemporaries as the 'Age of Noise'.1 Hardly surprising, considering the number of important developments in the history of modem aurality that originate in the period. It was during this time...
Read preview Overview
Wagner's Ring Cycle and Parade's End
It might seem at first glance fanciful to suggest that a work of music can constitute a major influence upon a purely literary work, such as Ford's Parade's End. Victor Hugo said 'Music expresses that which cannot be put into words and cannot remain...
Read preview Overview
'The 'Ind Legs of the Elephink': Pantomime, Prophecy, and Tosh in Parade's End
With the end of A Man Could Stand Up -, Ford gives us the climax but not the conclusion of Parade's End, his sequence of novels on England, the English, and the First World War. On the night of the Armistice ending the war, Ford's hero, Christopher Tietjens,...
Read preview Overview
Panorama, the Map, and the Divided Self: No Enemy, No More Parades, and Tolkien's the Lord of the Rings
One aspect of the experience of the First World War for junior officers that is often rather overlooked was their exposure to, even tactical reliance on, views from high places. This experience was most directly registered by looking at terrain from...
Read preview Overview
Sight and Scale in Parade's End
Ford and visual scaleThis chapter explores how Ford Madox Ford's on-going literary fascination with sight, scale, and reality was fundamentally altered by a war that dissolved perceived boundaries of space and time. Ford's work consistently explored...
Read preview Overview
How Much Mud Does a Man Need? Land and Liquidity in Parade's End
Mud and the First World War are inextricably linked. Almost any account of the Western Front features complaints about the wet terrain of France and Flanders: its numbing physicality, its cheerless visual homogeneity, its often deadly power. John Ellis,...
Read preview Overview
Tietjens Walking, Ford Talking
In Some Do Not . . ., travelling from the farcical and hilarious Duchemin breakfast to the Wannop cottage, Christopher Tietjens and Valentine walk across a field, in single file along a path which admits of nothing else. It is a scene that deals, among...
Read preview Overview
War and Division in Parade's End
The Vorticist-inflected opening to No More Parades gives us war as a drama of endurance, closing the reader into the tight spaces under assault by enemy technology and bringing us close to the mental breakdown of minds under such conditions. Its stylizations...
Read preview Overview
Ford and Lewis: The Attraction of Opposites
Modernists, in general, did not go to war. That the cataclysmic events of the First World War were reflected in the work of Eliot, Pound, Woolf and other key modernists is no surprise - but Pound's lament for a lost generation in Hugh Selwyn Mauberley...
Read preview Overview
'Cleaned, Sand-Dried Bones': Christopher Tietjens and the Labour of War
Ford Madox Ford's Parade's End tetralogy, particularly the second novel, No More Parades, explores the relations between mental stress and physical labour in the First World War. In doing so, the text inverts F. T. Marinetti's and Rupert Brooke's enthusiasm...
Read preview Overview
Articulations of Femininity in Parade's End
One of the dimensions inherent in Parade 's End is that of a case study of a particular class at a particular time in the history of England. This sociological aspect perhaps still remains underrated today. John Attridge has foregrounded Ford's sociologist...
Read preview Overview
'Better Far': Ford and Rossettian Attitudes
Little could be more salient than Ford Madox Ford's life-long interest in the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood, with particular reference (besides his estimable grandfather Ford Madox Brown, with whom he was very close) to Dante Gabriel Rossetti. In Some Do...
Read preview Overview
Death in the Wasteland: Ford, Wells, and Waugh
I vividly remember listening some years ago to a programme on National Public Radio about death - perhaps, one might say, about the pleasures of death. It was meant to show death as part of a natural process. If you are privileged to live, you are also...
Read preview Overview

Vol. 12, 2013

General Editor's Preface
Ford Madox Ford was a major presence in early twentieth-century literature, and he has remained a significant - if sometimes controversial - figure in the history of modem English and American literature for over a century. Throughout that time he has...
Read preview Overview
Introduction: Edwardian Ford?
Ford Madox Ford's literary career began a decade before Edward VII acceded to the throne in 1901. The eight books he had published by then - three fairy stories; his first novel; a biography of his grandfather, the painter Ford Madox Brown; two volumes...
Read preview Overview
Ford as Edwardian Author: Publishers, Trends, Markets
For some time now I have been looking for the opportunity to think in detail about what a book history approach to Ford might look like. A volume with the title The Edwardian Ford Madox Ford seemed the obvious prompt - given the changes in the publishing...
Read preview Overview
Ford Madox Ford: The Good Collaborator
I set out, as a writer-editor myself, to consider Ford as the writereditor who, with the Mexican poet and essayist Octavio Paz, has meant most to me. Both managed, I thought, the almost impossible balancing act that makes their editorial, creative and...
Read preview Overview
Ford's Henry James as a Double Impression
Written to mark the seventieth birthday of Henry James, whom Ford had first met in 1896 and read regularly since, Ford's Henry James (1913) serves a number of purposes: it allows Ford to pay homage where it is due, and to pre-empt the official academic...
Read preview Overview
Ford / Forster: Novel / Nuvvle
Ford Madox Ford published a harsh review of E. M. Forster's Aspects of the Novel1 in December 1927.2 This book was drawn from Forster's Clark Lectures at Trinity College, Cambridge. Ford had lectured in the States that very year on the English novel....
Read preview Overview
'In This Dead-Dawning Century': Ford Madox Ford's Edwardian Poetry
?The night's somewhat grimmer and something is goneOut of the comforting quiet of things as they are.'Ford, ?Sidera Cadentia (On the Death of Queen Victoria)' (1904)1?Rivets. To get on with the work - to stop the hole.'Joseph Conrad, Heart of Darkness...
Read preview Overview
Edwardian Idyll, Edwardian Mapping: The Heart of the Country
The idyllic is one of the canonical modes of the human imagination, alongside the heroic, the tragic, the satirical, the comic, the elegiac, and that turbid latecomer, the apocalyptic. Like all modes it configures and refigures the world in the light...
Read preview Overview
Empire of the Future: The Inheritors, Ford, Liberalism and Imperialism
The Inheritors, published in June 1901, was Ford's first book of the Edwardian age. At least, though it was produced in collaboration with Joseph Conrad, most of the writing was by Ford, who thought fewer than two thousand of the book's seventy-five...
Read preview Overview
'That Neurasthenia Joke': Degeneration and Eugenics in the Work of Ford Madox Ford and Violet Hunt
The most contradictory of writers, and a neurasthenic, Ford was wellqualified to comment on that panic-driven late Victorian and Edwardian obsession, degeneration. If Max Nordau, self-appointed prophet of apocalypse, was to be believed, there were ?two...
Read preview Overview
Modernity and the Technology of Communication in Ford Madox Ford's a Call and Henry James's in the Cage
Henry James's In the Cage (1898) and Ford Madox Ford's A Call (1910) explore the novelty of telegraphy and telephony and the modernity of the relationships which are mediated by these new technologies.1 The novels have much in common: both reference...
Read preview Overview
From the Priest to the Therapist: Secrecy, Technology and Language in Ford Madox Ford's a Call and May Sinclair's Anne Severn and the Fieldings
Ford Madox Ford and May Sinclair were good friends throughout the Edwardian period. Referring to Ford's Return to Yesterday, T. M. Boll, one of Sinclair's biographers, relates an interesting anecdote about their lasting relationship. In 1904, when Sinclair...
Read preview Overview
Ford's Early Fiction and ?Those Queer Effects of Real Life'
The Inheritors, Mr. Apollo, and Ladies Whose Bright Eyes might be called sports - playful, wilfully charming, and, in the evolutionary sense, odd.1 Although they are infused with ?Modemist openendedness',2 their author's resort to the modes of fantasy...
Read preview Overview
Ford Madox Ford on Hans Holbein, the Younger: Writing on Portraits and Portraits in Writing
Portraits in words and portraits in paint are opposites, rather than metaphors for each other. A painted portrait is an artist's record, construction, of a physical presence, with a skin of colour, a layer of strokes of the brush, or the point, or the...
Read preview Overview
The Fifth Queen, Revisionary History and the Staging of Nostalgia
Around the turn of the last century Ford Madox Ford had planned to write a work of history on Henry VIII after a governmental release of many documents related to his reign.1 But A. F. Pollard got to it first with his Henry VIII (1902) and as Ford did...
Read preview Overview
'Pretty Big and Serious': Ford Madox Ford and the Young Lovell
IntroductionThere is a peculiar fascination about the work that borders - chronologically and sometimes thematically - on an acknowledged masterpiece. The Marsden Case, Ford's 1923 novel, touches on many of the themes of Some Do Not. . . and preceded...
Read preview Overview

Vol. 11, 2012

General Editor's Preface
Ford Madox Ford has as often been a subject of controversy as a candidate for literary canonization. He was, nonetheless, a major presence in early twentieth-century literature, and he has remained a significant figure in the history of modern English...
Read preview Overview
Introduction: 'Dreaming Territory'
The twentieth century has often been called 'The American Century' - the age of its rise and triumph.1 America's early industrial prowess was reinforced, as the century progressed, by its creditor status in 1918, and the increasing potency of its model...
Read preview Overview
War and the Arts: James, Wells and Ford1
All life . . . comes back to the question of our speech, the medium through which we communicate with each other; for all life comes back to the question of our relations with each other.- Henry James, The Question of Our Speech (1905)Feel, feel, I say...
Read preview Overview
English Review, American Specter: The Critical Attitude Crosses the Atlantic
In December of 1908, Ford Madox Ford's monthly journal the English Review made its debut in the already crowded milieu of British periodicals. Ford's ambitious project to promote literature that aided what he called 'the comprehension of one kind of...
Read preview Overview
'Scattered but All Active': Ford Madox Ford and Transatlantic Modernism
How viable is 'the transatlantic' as a category for understanding modern literature and culture? Transatlantic crossings of various kinds have emerged in recent modernist studies as a compelling trope for understanding the period.1 The idea offers a...
Read preview Overview
Ford Madox Ford as Queen Victoria: The English Sovereignty of Impressionist Memory in Ford's Transatlantic Modernism
About two-thirds of the way through Jean Rhys' s first published novel, Quartet, it occurs to the heroine, Marya Zelli, that H. J. Heidler 'looks exactly like a picture of Queen Victoria'.1 The image offers a concise example of the techniques of impressionism...
Read preview Overview
America's Ford: Glenway Wescott, Katherine Anne Porter and Knopf's Parade's End
Glenway Wescott and the Young AmericansIn 1921 the young American expatriate writer Glenway Wescott was dining with Edith and Osbert Sitwell and their coterie of literary friends in London. Wescott mentioned that he was en route to visit Ford Madox Ford...
Read preview Overview
Does the Wicked Man?
Ford, F. M.A vivid study of a New York Publisher and successful businessman. 'The tragic, fascinating figure of Notterdam is modern man in his pilgrimage.' Mr. Ford's style, annoying to some readers, is soon forgotten in the interest the characters arouse.I...
Read preview Overview
Beyond Vengeance: Ford's When the Wicked Man as a Writerly Response to Jean Rhys
In Ford Madox Ford's 1932 prefatory note to the English edition of When the Wicked Man, he dismisses his new work as a 'silly novel5 and states that it is Only with reluctance and under the action of a force majeure as to whose incidence I cannot here...
Read preview Overview
'More Undraped Females and Champagne Glasses': Ford Madox Ford's Ambivalent Affair with Mass Culture
If Ford Madox Ford's 1931 novel When the Wicked Man is read at all today, it is read as a roman-à-clef about Ford's affair with his onetime protégé, Jean Rhys, whom he brutally satirizes in the novel as Lola Porter, a 'fiery Creole' and 'vampire Carmen'.1...
Read preview Overview
Great Trade Route and the Legacy of Slavery
With Last Post newly completed, Ford Madox Ford spent the autumn of 1927 in New York City at various addresses, including the National Arts Club on Gramercy Park and an apartment at 51 West 16th Street. From late November he rented an upstairs room from...
Read preview Overview
TECHNOCRACY AND THE FORDIAN ARTS: AMERICA, THE AMERICAN MERCURY AND MUSIC IN THE 1930s
I haven't, by the bye, had those copies of the mercury with my articles in them - nor indeed any of the others. Do shake your people up, will you? I want the small-holding article - and indeed the anti-propaganda one - for the book I am writing for the...
Read preview Overview
North and South: Ford Madox Ford's American Journalism during the Great Depression
Journalism is the triumph of criticism. That ephemeral sheet of paper, the newspaper, is the natural enemy of the book.Edmond and Jules de Goncourt, July 18581IntroductionThe Goncourt brothers believed that journalism was inevitably the enemy of the...
Read preview Overview
'This Extraordinary Riot of Obscenities': An Essay on Prudishness and Indecency
Edited by Max SaundersEditorial NoteThe following piece was possibly written as a lecture to an audience in New York. The opening appears to play on the disparity between the remembered 'little, little boy' and the rather larger figure cut by the grown-up...
Read preview Overview
Robert Lowell on Ford Madox Ford
No one admired more of his elders, or discovered more of his juniors, and so went on admiring and discovering till the end.Robert Lowell, On Two Poets'Near the end of his life, Ford met Robert Lowell, a twenty-year-old aspiring poet who would become...
Read preview Overview
From Boston to Denver
An Essay from the Unfinished Work 'Portraits of Cities': Edited by Max SaundersEditor's IntroductionIn 1936 Ford began work on a book he thought of as the third volume of a trilogy, joining Provence (1935) and Great Trade Route (1937). Like them, it...
Read preview Overview
Ford, Biala and New York: A Novelist's View
The subject of this volume is 'Ford and America', but as he lets us know in the title of his delightful essay: 'New York is not America'. And yet I feel free to concentrate on Ford's relationship to New York. In honoring Ford Madox Ford, it is perhaps...
Read preview Overview
Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.