Ludus

Articles

No. 13, 2014

Chapter II: Functions
Although the negative characters in medieval and sixteenthcentury Dutch and English drama rarely control their victim through his or her sense of guilt and shame, this quotation, asserting how easily a man can be manipulated by some evil influence, has...
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Chapter III: Theatricality
That Virgin Monarch, Queene Elizabeth ... having heard, or rather having seen a Sermon that was preached before Her with the advantage of pronunciation, was much affected and taken therewith, and having the same Sermon afterwards presented unto Her,...
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Chapter IV: Meta-Theatricality
Sie zu fassenverstäne ich schon -mich einzunisten -ihnen Streiche zu spielenim eigenen Haus -ist mein Element!1Meta-theatricality can have a fundamental impact on the experience of the spectators as it draws attention to the performance aspect. As such,...
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Chapter V: Historicising Vice
'So,' continued Bond, warming to his argument, 'Le Chiffre was serving a wonderful purpose, a really vital purpose, perhaps the best and highest purpose of all. By his evil existence, which foolishly I have helped to destroy, he was creating a norm of...
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Epilogue: Negative Characters as Gauges of Dramatic Traditions
By far the majority of the English and Dutch medieval and sixteenth-century plays catered for a desire to develop a better understanding of Man. In order to do so the playwrights normally presented the ideals Man ought to strive for, but they, realistically,...
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Introduction
Evil characters and behaviour have always exerted a fascination on both authors and scholars, as this quotation from Nabokov, an author and scholar, indicates. It is therefore not surprising that there are many negative characters in medieval and sixteenth-century...
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Chapter I: A Plethora of Evils: Introducing the Negative Characters
In reality, however, every ego, so far from being a unity is in the highest degree a manifold world, a constellated heaven, a chaos of forms, of states and stages, of inheritances and potentialities.1The names of the characters in English and Dutch drama...
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No. 11, 2012

Acknowledgments
We have passed through many counties in Europe, we have seen in Rome, in Italy and in various other countries and cities very large similar triumphs, we know some old respectable and reliable men who claim to have seen with amazement such things in various...
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Introduction
In his Fabula de hominc (1518), the Spanish humanist Juan Luis Vives tells a young nobleman from the Low Countries, Antoine de Berges, how Juno planned to give a birthday party.' She went to Jupiter and asked him to surprise her guests with a dramatic...
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Chapter I: Sources of the Entry into Antwerp of 1549
In his introduction to the official report of the entry into Antwerp, Grapheus emphasises that all people were extremely happy with the visit of the Emperor and his son. They had made every effort to accord them a warm welcome. According to the reporter,...
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Chapter II: A Forum for the Confirmation of Power Relations
The occasion for the entry into Antwerp was the public swearing of mutual oaths of allegiance by Philip and by representatives of the Antwerp city authorities. These oaths went back to the Blijde Inkomst (Joyous Entry) or Inauguration Charter, a territorial...
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Chapter III: The Entry into Antwerp Mirrored in Time and Space
In the previous chapter we saw how carefully along the road of the entry into Antwerp a picture was construed of a monarch and a city. Two types of characters were positioned side by side to construct the discourse on the monarch. In the program presented...
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Coda
WE can end this book as we started it - with a Story of Creation. For this, we will not consult Vives' s Fabula de homine but, rather, the impressive display of fireworks that marked the end of the Antwerp festivities. Those fireworks were inspired by...
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Chapter IV: The Antwerp Entry and Studia Humanitatis
In this final chapter, we will put the Antwerp entry into yet another context. While in the last chapter we studied its meaning in time and space, here we want to concentrate on the influence of humanism, widely spread among Latin (and to a limited extent...
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No. 12, 2012

Chantilly, Musée Condé, Ms. 617: Mystères as Convent Drama
In this article, I will be concentrating on two particular mystères preserved in one manuscript, Chantilly, Ms. 617. Unlike many of the plays discussed in this collection, the audience (and probable actors) of the Chantilly manuscript's two mystery plays...
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'Haro! Haro! Sus, Dyablerie': The Theatricality of Devils in Temptation Sequences
It is generally agreed that devils were popular and conventional characters in medieval French drama. One of the most recurrent additions to the biblical and apocryphal story of the mystères are the so-called diableries. The popularity of devil characters...
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Le Mystère De Saint Sébastien's Villain: "No Cuckoo Is a Sparrowhawk"
Although medieval European theatre is justly celebrated for its cooperative amateur pageantry, with communities coming together to re-enact Christian history, professional entertainers also did their work within these spectacles. In his contribution...
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La Pucelle and the Godons in the Mistère Du Siège d'Orléans: Civic Pageantry and Popular Tradition
Godefroy's Dictionnaire de l'ancienne langue française, the most informative source, gives reason to suppose that there was a special place reserved in the civic imagination of Orléans for the godon. This insulting term for an Englishman is not only...
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"Laisser l'Istoire ... et Moralisier Ung Petit": Aspects of Allegory in the Mystères
When he outlines his intention to suspend the narrative and 'moralize a little', the Prologue to the great Mystère de la Passion of Arnoul Gréban signals that his play will be more than just a dramatized commemoration of Biblical events but also an interpretation...
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Turning a Chanson De Geste into a Mystery, or Non-Religious and Chivalric Mystery Plays
The epic tradition of the French chanson de geste gave way to chivalric romance towards the beginning of the thirteenth century; at the same time, the theatre developed from Church liturgy. The genius of Chrétien the Troyes showed the way to a new narrative...
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Sermons in the Passions of Mercadé, Gréban and Jehan Michel
The links between the activity of preaching and theatrical activity are well established, and in two senses: preachers, who took the opportunity of staging mystères or tableaux vivants to illustrate their sermons,1 were inspired strongly by customs,...
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A Typology of Catalan Play Manuscripts from the Fourteenth to the Sixteenth Century
In the study of textual transmission of medieval drama, an important focus of interest is the conservation of texts or stage books used in or related to performances. In the late 1980s, the different types of play manuscripts were classified by Graham...
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Introduction
Though critics may want to categorize medieval drama, the truth is that many of the terms available to us, and which have historical authenticity, are imprecise: and this is as true for the mystères of this collection's title as for any other, including,...
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Mystère, Farce, Moralité: A Reflection upon the Poetics of Drama in the Middle Ages Based on Ms. BnF Fr. 904, Passion De Semur (Fifteenth Century), and Some Other Burgundian Manuscripts
It is no wonder that the BnF fr. 904 manuscript received little attention from medieval drama studies: who would care about a damaged copy, whose last text was apparently incomplete? Nonetheless, three critics found it worth studying or even publishing:...
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The Theatricality of Pre- and Post-Performance French Mystery Play Texts
Two separate typologies, the first by Graham Runnalls and the second by the team of Elisabeth Lalou and Darwin Smith, have catalogued the various utilizations that French mystery play manuscripts might exemplify. In both typologies distinctions are drawn...
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Michel Adapts Gréban: Some Aspects of the Passion Sequence
Comparison between the Passion of Arnoul Gréban which was written c. 1450 and the revision or "correction" of it by Jean Michel for the performance at Angers in 1486 remains one of the most intriguing aspects of the history of the mystères. The process...
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