Mark Twain Journal

Articles

Vol. 54, No. 2, 2016

Editor's Note
This issue honors Kevin Mac Donnell, a truly extraordinary figure in Mark Twain studies. There has been never been someone like Mac Donnell in our field of scholarship-or, for that matter, probably in any area of American literature. He wears four hats-all...
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Colossal Collection
For many Mark Twain scholars, the answers to research quests might be found at the Mark Twain Papers in Berkeley, or in one of the three major locales with museums devoted to documenting his life: Hannibal, Hartford, and Elmira. For others, some answers...
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"The Prairie Years" of Kevin Mac Donnell
Kevin Mac Donnell-his hand and his pen.He will be good but God knows when.I have been waiting forty-seven years for someone to ask about Kevin Mac Donnell.I have a file.It is not easy to find Mark Twain tropes in the personal life of Kevin Mac Donnell,...
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Scholar Kevin Mac Donnell
Twain scholarship, happily, has never been restricted only to certified academics, but has always been open and welcoming to individuals who, whatever their background and occupation, simply knew something worth knowing about Twain. In this practice...
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Book Dealer Kevin Mac Donnell
I met Kevin in the late 1980s. I'd been in the antiquarian book business for a decade or so, and was just beginning to spread my wings-having realized that if good books weren't coming to my shop, I should go where the good books were. In fact, I was...
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Citizen Kevin Mac Donnell
My friend Kevin MacDonnell, though still relatively young in years, is one of the old-timers of our neighborhood. He and his wife Donna were some of the first pioneers of our area, on the wild and woolly outskirts of Austin, Texas. One quiet fall afternoon...
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Abbreviated List of Publications and Honors
Education:B.A., English, University of Houston, 1976M.A., Library Science, University ofTexas, 1979Books & Monographs:The Texans. New York: Time-Life Books, 1975. Contributor.Longfellow's Earliest Poetry. Houston: Grail Press, 1977.The Jenkins Company....
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A Partial "Reassurance of Fratricide": Redefining National Unity in Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
IntroductionIn his seminal work, Imagined Communities: Reflections on the Origin and Spread of Nationalism, Benedict Anderson writes that Mark Twain provided "the first indelible image of black and white as American 'brothers': Jim and Huck companionably...
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On Teaching Huckleberry Finn
When news broke in 2011 that NewSouth Books was set to publish an edited edition of both The Adventures of Tom Sawyer and Adventures of Huckleberry Finn without the n-word, I, like many others, was skeptical and even critical. My then-students and I...
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Piloting a Steamboat, Riding a Stagecoach, and Following the Equator: A Course in the Writings of Mark Twain
This new course was taught from September 2015 to June 2016 at Seton Hall Preparatory School in New Jersey. It had multiple purposes. Its chief objective was to foster an awareness of and appreciation for the life and works of America's author and storyteller...
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Love and Debt: A True Story of Mary Ann Cord, John T. Lewis, and Mark Twain at Quarry Farm
In his octagonal study at Quarry Farm, reminiscent of a steamboat pilothouse overlooking the Chemung River and the town of Elmira, New York, Mark Twain wrote two of his most powerful works and the gem of a short story, "A True Story, Repeated Word for...
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"Cooling Our Bottom on the Sand Bars": A Chronicle of Low Water Trips on the Mississippi River, 1860
A "glorious time of getting out of the river"In November 1860, Sam Clemens, pilot of the steamer Alonzo Child, was running up river "in the fog," trying to make some time "in order to beat another boat." It was about seventy miles from New Orleans, on...
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Orion Clemens's Presidential Appointment
I have always considered Mark Twain to be, indirectly, President Lincoln's great gift to American literature. After reading the diary of President Lincoln's treasurer, Edward Bates, one must certainly afford him a role in that gift. Remember that Bates,...
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New Staff Members, Center for Mark Twain Studies at Elmira College
A visit was in order for the Mark Twain Journal to meet the new director and staff of the Center for Mark Twain Studies at Elmira College. In 2012 the Journal began an affiliation with the Center and currently lists it as its editorial address. This...
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Memorial Roster of Mark Twain Scholars, 2016 Update
BAKER, LAURA NELSON (January 7, 1911, Humbolt, Iowa-January 10, 2003, Minneapolis, Minnesota). Attended University of Minnesota (1929-31). Author, editor, librarian. Professional career at Richfield {MI) News (1949-53), University of California, Berkeley...
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Farewell: Robert Regan, 1930-2016
Robert Regan, 86, of Philadelphia, a retired University of Pennsylvania English professor whose affinity for literature about the struggles of American life was rooted in his own challenging childhood, died of heart failure Tuesday, July 5, at the Hospital...
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Dancing on the Color Line: African American Tricksters in Nineteenth-Century American Literature
GRETCHEN MARTIN, Dancing on the Color Line: African American Tricksters in Nineteenth-Century American Literature. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 2015. 197 pp. Index. Cloth.Gretchen Martin's first four chapters examine the trickster figures...
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Mark Twain and Youth: Studies in His Life and Writings
KEVIN MAC DONNELL and R. KENT RASMUSSEN, eds. Mark Twain and Youth: Studies in His Life and Writings. Illus. London: Bloomsbury Academic, 2016. 313 pp. Index. Paper.This collection of twenty-six essays addresses the varied uses that Twain made of youth,...
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Chasing the Last Laugh: Mark Twain's Raucous and Redemptive Round-the-World Comedy Tour
RICHARD ZACKS, Chasing the Last Laugh: Mark Twain's Raucous and Redemptive Round-the-World Comedy Tour. New York: Doubleday, 2016. 462 pp. Index. Cloth.Not since Michael Shelden's spellbinding Mark Twain, Man in White: The Grand Adventure of His Final...
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Vol. 54, No. 1, Spring

Editor's Note
The Spring 2016 issue of the Mark Twain Journal recognizes Henry Sweets of Hannibal, Missouri as a "Legacy Director and Curator," fifth in the series of Legacy awards. During thirty-eight years of affiliation with the Mark Twain Boyhood Home and Museum,...
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Legacy Director and Curator: Henry Sweets
Henry Sweets is the Executive Director of the Mark Twain Boyhood Home and Museum in Hannibal, Missouri. With thirty-eight years of full-time employment as director or curator he has overseen the development of the Mark Twain Boyhood Home and its environs...
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Mark Twain Kills A Boy
On the afternoon of Easter Sunday, April 2, 1893, young Willie Stebbins and his friends in Mound City, Missouri attended Sunday-school. Late that night, under a full moon, four masked men crept menacingly through the shadowy aisles of the town's dry...
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"The Nameless Something": Authorial Suicide and the True Body of the Autobiography of Mark Twain
Introduction"I would like the literary world to see (as Howells says)," Samuel Clemens wrote to Henry Rogers in 1906, "that the form of this book [the Autobiography] is one of the most memorable literary inventions of the ages" (Leary 611). These words,...
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"I Promise the Public No Amusement": Governor Mark Twain, Governor James W. Nye, and the Third Annual Message
When Samuel Clemens walked into the district courtroom of the Ormsby County Courthouse in Carson City on January 27, 1864 to deliver his first public address to a paying audience, he likely had no vision of the highly lucrative career as a platform artist...
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Devil-Lore and Avatars: Moncure Conway's Likely Influence on No. 44, the Mysterious Stranger
IntroductionSince the publication of Leah Strongs biography of Joseph Twichell in the mid-1960s, scholars have increasingly explored the influence that Twain's friend and pastor had on the humorist. Most recently, Steve Courtney's work has provided additional...
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Early Predecessors of the King and the Duke in Mark Twain's Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
While many memorable characters from nineteenth-century American literature remain part of the American imagination, few are as humorously rapacious and as brazenly fraudulent as Mark Twains King and Duke, the "rapscallions" who, in the latter half of...
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Huck Finn as the Fictive Son of George W. Harris's Sut Lovingood
I hes jis' this tu say: Ef yu ain't fond ove the smell ove crackling, stay outen the kitchin . . . an' ef the moon hurts yer eyes, don't yu ever look at a Dutch cheese. That's jis' all ove hit.... Then thar's the book-butchers, orful on killing an' cuttin...
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Abraham Lincoln at the Phelps Farm
It has been customary to think of Tom and Huck's freeing of Jim at the Phelps farm in Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1885) as just another of Tom's applications of his readings of European romance. In this instance Alexandre Dumas seems to be the boy's...
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Twain Sleuth at the Library of Congress
The following three notes recount discoveries at the Library of Congress made by John Lockwood, who investigates details Mark Twain used in his writings. The fourth contribution by Lockwood is a transcription of two articles that appeared in the St....
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King Leopold's Soliloquy
Books ReceivedMark Twain, King Leopold's Soliloquy. Intro, by Hunt Hawkins. Illustrated. New Orleans: University of New Orleans Press, 2016. 60 pp. Paper.In 1905 Mark Twain published two dramatic monologues in which powerful rulers _ n if accused of...
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Vol. 53, No. 2, Fall

Editor's Note
As the Mark Twain Journal approaches its eightieth year of publication (it was originally known as the Mark Twain Quarterly at its inception in 1936), one marvels that the current editor is only the third person to hold this post. The founding editor...
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Legacy Scholar: R. Kent Rasmussen
If name recognition alone were the sole criterion for being a Legacy Scholar, Kent Rasmussen would already have owned the title thanks to his magnum opus, Mark Twain A to Z, which has outsold the average book about Mark Twain by a ratio of more than...
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Mark Twain and Joseph Roswell Hawley
This essay traces the relationship between Mark Twain and a Hartford, Connecticut, friend and neighbor, Joseph Roswell Hawley, who was a congressman and senator.1 Twain often aided Hawley's efforts to achieve political office and, conversely, Hawley...
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Guests and Songs in Twain's "Letter from Carson City"
Up on the famed Comstock Lode in Virginia City, Nevada, Sam Clemens lived as a reporter for the Territorial Enterprise newspaper. He remained awake all night Wednesday so he would not miss Thursdays early morning stagecoach for Carson City, the territorial...
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"The Mississippi Was a Virgin Field": Reconstructing the River before Mark Twain, 1865-1875
In the decade after the Civil War, in the years before Mark Twain made the river his own, the Mississippi was a vital site and symbol that gained a renewed place in American literature and culture. At the moment that Americans turned to their landscape...
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"The Hated Blood Was in His Own Veins!": Miscegenation and Rage in Mark Twain's Which Was It?
For nine years Mark Twain worked on a series of dream narratives between 1896 and 1905. "Their principal fable is that of a man who has been long favored by luck while pursuing a dream of success that has seemed about to turn into reality. Sudden reverses...
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The Burglar Alarm in "The McWilliamses and the Burglar Alarm"
Inal 906 Autobiographical Dictation, Clemens recalls the constant aggravation of the electric burglar alarm at their home in Hartford that "led a gay and careless life, and had no principles."1 If nothing else, however, the alarm inspired Twain to write...
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Real Romance before "The Loves of Alonzo Fitz Clarence and Rosannah Ethelton"
In 1878, Mark Twain penned a satire, "The Loves of Alonzo Fitz Clarence and Rosannah Ethelton," about a long-distance romance conducted by telephone. As Twain's story opens, Alonzo is staying indoors from a snowstorm in Eastport, Maine. While on the...
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In Praise of Mark Woodhouse
Mark Twain and Mark Woodhouse are kindred spirits in so many ways. Mark Twain, starting in 1908, raised funds and donated thousands of books to establish a library in Redding, Connecticut. Seventy-nine years later Mark Woodhouse arrived at the Elmira...
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Before the Big Bonanza: Dan De Quille's Early Comstock Accounts
Before the Big Bonanza: Dan De Quilles Early Comstock Accounts, ed. Donnelyn Curtis and Lawrence I. Berkove. Columbia: University of Missouri Press, 2015. 316 pp. Index. Cloth.Donnelyn Curtis, head of Special Collections at the University of Nevada Reno,...
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Twain's Brand: Humor in Contemporary American Culture
JUDITH YAROSS LEE, Twain's Brand: Humor in Contemporary American Culture. Illustrated. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 2012. 226 pp. Index. Cloth.Twain's Brand sets out to prove that "Mark Twain's comic capital remains productive and profitable...
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Mark Twain on Potholes and Politics: Letters to the Editor
Mark Twain on Potholes and Politics: Letters to the Editor, ed. Gary Scharnhorst. Columbia: University of Missouri Press, 2014. 208 pp. Index. Cloth.Gary Scharnhorst has retrieved 101 examples of opinionative letters and columns that Mark Twain either...
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Vol. 53, No. 1, Spring

Editor's Note
Two feature articles in this issue deserve special notice by Mark Twain scholars and readers.Kevin Mac Donnell, who startled the scholarly community and attracted the attention of the larger book world with a convincing theory he proposed in the Mark...
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Legacy Scholar: Tom Quirk
Thomas Vaughan Quirk was born in Houston, Texas, on December 28, 1946. Though a native Texan, he lit out for the former Arizona Territory as a child and was educated in the public schools there, which may begin to explain why there is absolutely no pretense...
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On Samuel Clemens's Lost "Josh" Letters: A Speculation and Three Documents
One of the most glaring lacunae in Mark Twain scholarship is the "Josh" correspondence that Samuel Clemens ostensibly contributed to the Virginia City Territorial Enterprise. In the standard version of events, while mining near Aurora, Nevada, in April...
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Mark Twain's Lost Sweetheart
The first thing one notices about the young woman who fixes us with a steady gaze is her wide face; one could even say it is oblong. She's held that gaze for nearly 160 years from the safe confines of the ambrotype photograph she sat for in Keokuk, Iowa...
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Business Managers in Mark Twains "The £1,000,000 Bank-Note"
The influence of Mark Twain should, by itself, recommend his writings for possible use in developing critical thinking about business managers, their work, and their organizations. His life and work symbolize the essence of American cultural history...
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"An Immense Revelation": The Correct Date and Significance of the Article That Prompted Joseph Twichell's "Rubáiyát Note" to Mark Twain
Twain scholars hoping to glean insights into the spiritual dynamic between the Reverend Joseph H. Twichell and Samuel Clemens frequently cite a brief postcard the devout Congregationalist minister sent to his friend after reading the Hartford Courant...
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Sam Clemens, Steamboat Pilot for the Confederacy
"These Stirring Times of Secession"In 1887, when long on the river, Horace Bixby recalled that his former steersman Samuel L. Clemens, while on the steamer Alonzo Child in 1861 under Capt. DeHaven, had "kept turning the wheel until the war broke out....
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Mark Twain and the Levant Herald
Chapter 34 of Mark Twain's The Innocents Abroad ( 1869) describes his visit to Constantinople, or modern Istanbul. Twain mentions a beleaguered local English-language newspaper, the Levant Herald. It occurred to me, why not go to the U.S. Library of...
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Interview with Bonnyeclaire Smith-Stewart about George Griffin, Hartford Butler of Mark Twain
Bonnyeclaire Smith-Stewart received her B.A. degree from Sarah Lawrence College and is currently a graduate student in history at Clark Atlanta University in Atlanta, Georgia. She is the founder of 4MillionVoices, Inc., a non-profit organization dedicated...
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Mark Twain: The Gift of Humor
Harold H. Kolb Jr., Mark Twain: The Gift of Humor. Lanham, Maryland: University Press of America, 2015. 504 pp. Index. Cloth.Kolb's large book opens with Louis J. Budd's reminder (seconding William Dean Howells's adjuration) that all of Mark Twain's...
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Huck Finn's America: Mark Twain and the Era That Shaped His Masterpiece
ANDREW LEVY, Huck Finns America: Mark Twain and the Era That Shaped His Masterpiece. New York: Simon & Schuster, 2015. 368 pp. Index. Cloth.It might seem somewhat impertinent, given this late date and the mountain of perceptive studies of Mark Twain's...
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Vol. 52, No. 2, Fall

Editor's Note
In this issue the Mark Twain Journal honors Lawrence I. Berkove as a Legacy Scholar. His former student (and now professor of English at Eastern Michigan University) Joseph Csicsila summarizes the importance of Berkove's scholarship to Mark Twain studies.The...
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Legacy Scholar: Lawrence I. Berkove
My earliest memory of Larry Berkove as a student of his in the late 1980s is something he said to me once during a conversation in his office between classes. I had asked him how he selected the writers he had worked on over the course of his career,...
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Nikola Tesla and Samuel Clemens: The Friendship between Two Luminaries of the Gilded Age
IntroductionNikola Tesla (1856-1943) was an American scientist of Serbian origin. His greatest contributions to the science and technological progress of human civilization were the invention of the rotating magnetic field, induction motor, polyphase...
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Sam Clemens's Misunderstood Hoax
By the time nineteen-year-old Sam Clemens reported for work at his brother's printing business in Keokuk, Iowa in the summer of 1855, he was an experienced typesetter who had worked in Hannibal, St. Louis, New York and Philadelphia, an avid reader who'd...
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"I Am an American": The Political Consequences of Hank Morgan's Lack of Identity
Mark Twain is widely held up as the quintessential author of the American experience. His novels and other writings serve to illuminate the unique experiences of the American individual. What must not be forgotten, however, is how fundamentally political...
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Mark Twain vs. God: The Story of a Relationship
In the First Presbyterian Church of Shreveport, Louisiana, where my childhood religious training took place, we did not have anyone like Clemens's beloved pastor the Reverend Joseph H. Twichell. No, we had Dr. B-, who would preach on hell for a solid...
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Tom Sawyer Impersonates "The Original Confidence Man"
All those who have published on the topic of confidence men in American literature have been in agreement on two formative authors: Herman Melville and Mark Twain.1 This consensus is somewhat surprising, considering the term and its derivatives appear...
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Interview with McAvoy Layne: Mark Twain Educator
Various Mark Twain impersonators show up at Twain events, and then there is McAvoy Layne who continually and joyfully promotes Mark Twain and his works through live performances, audio, and Skype.MTJ: How do you fit in the Mark Twain look-alike crowd?McL:...
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Life Imitates Mark Twain
Mark Twain's 1869 short story "The Legend of the Capitoline Venus" imagines a most profitable hoax upon the art world of Italy. A povertystricken artist named George Arnold, working in Rome, has just sculpted a beautiful woman's statue that nobody wants...
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Isaiah Sellers's Journal: A Note
As Mark Twain makes clear in Chapter 50 of Life on the Mississippi, Captain Isaiah Sellers (1803-1864) was one of the earliest steamboat pilots on the Mississippi River. Twain rightfully credits him there with the custom of tapping the bell as a signal...
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Farewell: J. R. LeMaster, 1934-2014
J. R. LeMaster died on June 29, 2014 in Waco, Texas. Born in Pike County, Ohio, he went to schools in Camp Creek, Washington Court House, and New Boston, Ohio. After serving four years in the U.S. Navy he attended Defiance College in Defiance, Ohio....
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Vol. 52, No. 1, Spring

Editor's Note
Having caught up with a publication schedule that had fallen behind owing to the illness and death of the much-missed previous editor, Thomas A. Tenney, the Mark Twain Journal now resumes its twice-yearly appearance. It was necessary to put together...
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Mark Twain's Cheerful Determinist: Good News in What Is Man?
Mark Twain's "gospel," the philosophical dialogue What is Man?, which rejects, with airy joie de vivre, humanity's free will, was first presented as "What is Happiness?" to the Monday Evening Club in Hartford on 19 February 1883 (Baender 4). Though he...
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Legacy Scholar: David E. E. Sloane
Thomas Edison once said, "An American loves his family. If he has any love left over for some other person, he generally selects Mark Twain." Is it any surprise that David E. E. Sloane, a pre-eminent Mark Twain scholar and critic, is a great-grandson...
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Mark Twain's Recovered Comic Voice in "You've Been a Dam Fool/Damfool, Mary"
LifeWe laugh and laugh,Then cry and cry-Then feebler laugh,Then die.- Mark Twain's Notebook (1898)Early in 2001, a donation was made to the Mark Twain Archive at Elmira College in Elmira, New York. The gift contained a letter-from Samuel Clemens's secretary,...
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Mark Twain's Conscience as the "Mysterious Autocrat": Why Moral Philosophers Need Literature
As a teacher of ethics I have long been embarrassed by moral philosophers' fecklessness in providing vivid, forceful and believable illustrations of moral dilemmas. Mark Twain to the rescue! From a philosophical point of view, perhaps his strong suit...
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The Dark Hoaxes of "The Man That Corrupted Hadleyburg"
(Corrected Version of Article in Volume 51 )Twain's characteristic technique of emplacing hoaxes at the thematic cores of his main works is at its peak in "The Man That Corrupted Hadleyburg" (1899). It is one of his best and most popular stories. The...
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Old Man River: The Mississippi River in North American History
PAUL SCHNEIDER, Old Man River: The Mississippi River in North American History. New York: Henry Holt and Co., 2013. 394 pp. Index. Cloth.By a coincidence two of the most absorbing books about the river with which Mark Twain is forever associated have...
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Farewell: Beverly Rose David, 1927-2013
Beverly Rose David, known as "Penny" to her colleagues, died November 19, 2013 in Green Valley, Arizona. With her death, Mark Twain studies lost a trailblazer in the art of reading and interpreting the illustrations that accompanied his first editions.David...
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The Bohemians: Mark Twain and the San Francisco Writers Who Reinvented American Literature
BEN TARNOFF, The Bohemians: Mark Twain and the San Francisco Writers Who Reinvented American Literature. New York: Penguin Press, 2014. 319 pp. Index. Cloth.Students of Mark Twain acknowledge the crucial tutelage that Mark Twain benefited from after...
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Mark Twain's Italian Villas
Professor Ishihara visited Villa Vivani and Villa di Quarto. Here he shares his observations and photographs of the villas and includes Twain's comments about them.Moving to Villa Viviani, 1892In June 1891, facing serious financial difficulty, Samuel...
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Vol. 51, No. 1/2, Spring-Fall

Editor's Note
Kevin Mac Donnell's much-publicized "How Samuel Clemens Found 'Mark Twain'" (Mark Twain Journal, Volume 50) was summarized by Daniel Hernandez in the Los Angeles Review of Books, went viral on Salon, com, and subsequently was referenced by the Chronicle...
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The Dark Hoaxes of "The Man That Corrupted Hadleyburg"
Twain's characteristic technique of emplacing hoaxes at the thematic cores of his main works is at its peak in "The Man That Corrupted Hadleyburg" (1899). It is one of his best and most popular stories. The critical literature on it is unusually extensive;...
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Who Killed Charlie Webster?
A Brief Review of the Twain-Webster RelationshipThe story of the relationship between Mark Twain and his hapless nephew has been told many times, and accounts for at least two books devoted to the subject and entire chapters in several others.1 On September...
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Mark Twain's Dream Life
Toward the end of his life Twain became obsessed with the difference between waking life and dream life; the notion of multiple selves and personalities; solipsism, the view that only he and his ideas exist; and the notion that his dreams were caused...
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Boss Morgan: Mark Twain and American Political Culture
Dr. Darryl Baskin became the second director of the Center for Mark Twain Studies at Elmira College. Shortly before Dr. Baskin died suddenly in 1992 he completed the following article that he never had the opportunity to submit for publication. As a...
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Mark Twain and the American Civil War
In his book For Cause and Comrades James McPherson reviews Civil War soldiers' letters and diaries to determine why men fought in the American Civil War. McPherson uses a sample of 1,076 soldiers (647 Union and 429 Confederate) that is skewed toward...
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Sam Clemens's Friends at Lake Tahoe
Before joining the staff of the Territorial Enterprise, Sam Clemens spent thirteen months in Nevada Territory. This essay looks at the people involved with Clemens's two September 1861 trips to Lake Tahoe, Nevada that filled Chapters 21, 22, and 23 of...
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Addenda to the Memorial Roster of Mark Twain Scholars
The following are additions to the "Memorial Roster" (MTJ, volume 49).Baskin, Darryl Benny (March 2,1937, Alameda, California-December 19,1992, Pine City, New York). University of California at Berkeley doctorate (1966). Professional career at Hayward...
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Vol. 50, No. 1/2, Spring-Fall

Mark Twain Bibliography, Number 6
This supplemental bibliography to Dr. Thomas A. Tenney's Mark Twain: A Reference Guide (G.K Hall, 1977) was in progress when Dr. Tenney, editor of the Mark Twain Journal, passed away in February 2012. Dr. Barbara Snedecor of Elmira College has transcribed...
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How Samuel Clemens Found "Mark Twain" in Carson City
On January 29, 1863 Sam Clemens took the stagecoach to Carson City, Nevada, saw something there, and became "Mark Twain" within days. His first piece of writing using his new persona was a letter written from Carson City which appeared in the Virginia...
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Where Are We with the Controversy over Isabel V. Lyon?
There is much speculation and debate about the last decade of Samuel L. Clemens's life, especially concerning his relationship with his secretary, Miss Isabel Van Kleek Lyon (1863-1958). After the death of his beloved and cherished wife, Olivia, Clemens...
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Vol. 49, No. 1/2, Spring-Fall

The Profane Twain: His Personal and Literary Cursing
AbbreviationsAuto The Autobiography of Mark Twain. Ed. Charles Neider. New York: HarperCollins, 1990.AutoMT 1 Autobiography of Mark Twain Vol. 1. Ed. Harriet Elinor Smith, Berkeley, U of California P, 2010.BE Mark Twain at the Buffalo Express: Articles...
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Memorial Roster of Mark Twain Scholars
On 29 June 2012, I received an e-mail note from Kent Rasmussen who was in the midst of wrapping up his forthcoming book Dear Mark Twain scheduled for release in 2013:As if researching correspondents to secure permissions isn't enough, now I'm finding...
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Mark Twain and May Isabel Fisk: Parallels in Comic Monologues
May Isabel Fisk, born in New York City, was a popular vaudeville performer in New York, Boston, and London, a minor playwright, and the author and performer of comic monologues in the early 1900s, some of them published in Harper's Magazine (Leonard...
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Mark Twain and the Cloak of Culture
The last decade has seen a pronounced interest in Mark Twain s "Chinese" writings, partly attributable to a developing focus on his anti-imperialist writings, spurred by the work of the late Jim Zwick, and the 2010 republication, after 142 years of undeserved...
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